Spring 2022

Students choose to complete either a Learning Community or a First Year Seminar to complete the FYE graduation requirement.

Learning Communities (LC) link two academic courses (6-8 credit hours). Faculty teaching these courses work together to establish joint activities and common curriculum themes designed to explore the ways in which subjects are interrelated. All Learning Communities fulfill the FYE graduation requirement in addition to counting towards other general education requirements (listed with each LC).

A First Year Seminar (FYSE) is an academic course (3 credit hours) that explores special topics taught by outstanding faculty.

All FYE courses have an attached Synthesis Seminar (FYSS). Upperclassmen serve as peer facilitators and lead weekly 50-minute synthesis seminars that introduce students to the College’s academic community. The synthesis seminar component offers the advantage of getting the perspective of and advice from a successful College of Charleston student.

Students must be enrolled in all parts of their Learning Community (including all science labs) or First-Year Seminar to receive credit.

Information about online courses, when applicable: 

Online courses are indicated as such and are listed as either Synchronous (SYNC) or Asynchronous (ASYNC).

  •   Synchronous online course class meetings are facilitated during the times they are listed, and students and faculty may interface in real time via Zoom or other video sharing software methods.
  •   Asynchronous online courses will not meet during a regularly scheduled time for class meetings.

Most courses will be in-person unless labeled as online.

Countries and Cultures, Past and Present
From Gullah to Gujarati to Guaraní: Multilingualism and Multiculturalism Throughout the World
Destinations: The Social, Economic, and Ethical Dimensions of Travel
Exploring Cultural Strengths and Diversity through Storytelling
American Popular Culture

Engaging with Society through Contemporary Issues and Relationships
Re-scripting (Dis)Ability
Children and Families with Diverse Needs: How are they served in your community?
Small for Big: Small Patterns to Solve the Big Problems YOU Care About
Friends and the City
Inclusive Visions of Sustainability for the 21st Century

Exploration of Self, Identity, and Development
Financial Literacy for Generation Z
Queer Questions: LGBTQ+ Historical Identities (Critical Conversations Course)
The Exotic "Other" in American Life and Culture
Bad Hombres/Spicy Vixens: Exploring Latino/a Stereotypes in the United States
Emerging Adulthood: The Age of Possibilities
Live Happy and Healthy

Exploration of Technology, Science, and Nature
In the Mood for Food
Paddling Towards Sustainability
Doom and Glory: How Geology Changed Society
Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics
Connecting with Nature in the Modern World
AR You Experienced: Augmented & Virtual Reality for Travel & Adventure
The Scientist in Society

Engaging Our World through the Arts, Literature, and Religion
New Ways of Seeing: Producing Art in Contemporary Culture
Banned Books
Writers Change the World
Revolutionary Poets Society: Slam Poetry, Spoken Word, and Adolescent Life
Theatre’s Visual Language
Hollywood and History: Costume Design in Film
Schooled: Exploring Anti-Racism, Inclusion, and Equity Through Children's Literature
Female Action Figures on Screen




Learning Communities:

Re-scripting (Dis)Ability (LC1)
ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSE 139: The Human Artist: Beyond Dis-Ability and FYSS 101
Kathy Béres Rogers and Laura Turner
English and Theatre and Dance
4 English Credits and 3 elective Credits
CRNs: TBA and TBA and TBA
Course times: TBA and TBA

What do we mean when we discuss disability- intellectual, mental, or physical? Where do we draw the line between something that should be “cured” and something that can be celebrated? In ENGL 110, students will write about the ways disability has been represented and how it intersects with racial, sexual, gendered, and ethnic identities. Students interview fellow students from the SNAP program who have been labeled as having a “disability.” In the paired theatre course, students will research theatrical techniques used to build community and foster inclusion. Students will design and lead theatrical experiences with their classmates and with HEART, an inclusive artistic community. The course will culminate in a collaborative artistic experience grounded in research from both courses.

 

In the Mood for Food (LC3)
HEAL 257: Principles of Nutrition (ONLINE) and FYSE 135: Food for Thought and FYSS 101
Bea Lavelle and Michelle Futrell
Health and Human Performance
6 elective credits
CRNs: TBA and TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA (ONL ASYNC) and TBA and TBA

This Learning Community will explore the profound effect of food on health. Alongside studying the nuts and bolts of nutrition, students will  learn how our moods are governed by the gut-brain connection. In the Principles of Nutrition course students will apply the national recommendations to personal nutrition habits while investigating the science behind nutrition and the impact of our nutritional choices on risk factors for chronic disease. In Food for Thought students will explore evidence-based science that proves thoughts and nutrition are deeply intertwined and have a direct impact on emotional wellbeing. Through the exploration of the gut-brain axis students will learn how to harness and maximize its power to feel happier.

 

Children and Families with Diverse Needs: How are they served in your community? (LC4)
PSYC 103: Intro to Psychological Science and FYSE 138: Children and Families with Diverse Needs and FYSS 101
Silvia Youssef Hanna and Genevieve Hay
Psychology and Teacher Education
3 social science and 3 elective credits
CRNs: TBA and TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA and TBA

This learning community will merge the fields of Psychology and Education to explore alternative careers in working with children and their families. Students will examine how cultural competence and diversity play a central role in working with children and their families. Psychology 103 will introduce the tools psychologists use to investigate, describe, predict and explain emotions, thoughts and behaviors, emphasizing reactions to illness. Students will learn how to interview various professionals who work with children to equip students with a broader knowledge of alternative opportunities available in working with children beyond the typical career paths. (Sample career paths covered will be Child Life Specialists, Pediatric Medicine, Behavioral Specialists, Special and General Education, Physical Therapists, Recreation Therapists, Speech and Language Pathologists, Occupational Therapists, Healthcare Social Workers, Guidance Counselors, School Nurses, and Juvenile Justice Professionals.)

 

New Ways of Seeing: Producing Art in Contemporary Culture (LC5)
ARTS 220: Sculpture I and ARTS 119: Drawing I and FYSS 101
Jarod Charzewski and Yvette Dede
Studio Art
6 elective credits
CRNs: TBA and TBA and TBA
Course times: TBA and TBA and TBA

This learning community will be a studio art collaboration between Sculpture I and Drawing I. Its purpose is to introduce the study of 2D and 3D art production as they are created in contemporary society. The term “Contemporary” will be defined as happening right now. This means techniques, concepts, and subject matters covered in this class will be accompanied by current examples from the art world and our global culture. We will place emphasis on professional practice through lectures, gallery visits, and visiting artists. These will also function as our connections to the art world. Through critiques students will learn the empowerment of language and critical discourse as we discuss materials, skill, aspects of form, space and presentation.

 

Paddling Towards Sustainability (LC6)
BIOL 102: Concepts and Applications in Biology II and BIOL 102L (Lab)* and  PEAC 126: Coastal Kayaking and FYSS 101
Miranda McManus and Ashley Brown
3 science credits and 2 elective credits
CRNs: TBA and TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA and TBA

This learning community will build awareness of the coastal environment and its benefits and fragility by allowing students to get into it to appreciate it. Through kayaking, students will learn about tides, currents, and the Charleston area waterways. In Biology, students will use evolutionary theory and a basic knowledge of the diversity of life to gain an understanding of various ecological issues, with a particular focus on those affecting coastal ecosystems. Students will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in nature and learn ways to protect local ecosystems, all while building competency as paddlers. The experience of being in the world they are being asked to protect should create a lifelong love and respect for our precious local habitat.
* Students must enroll in BIOL 102L separately for full enrollment in this Learning Community
**BIOL 101 and BIOL 101L are prerequisites - successful completion required prior to enrolling in BIOL 102/BIOL 102L
***BIOL 102/BIOL 102L is not intended for Biology Majors - students should take BIOL 112/112L

 

 

First-Year Seminars:

Small for Big: Small Patterns to Solve the Big Problems YOU Care About
FYSE 112 and FYSS 101
RoxAnn Stalvey
Computer Science
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

Pre-Med, Business, Arts ... whatever your area of interest, data abounds! Facts about your field, when turned into information, will lead to fantastic discoveries and advancements. In this course, students will cover the fundamentals of computational thinking in the study of non-computing disciplines. Topics will include ethical and social considerations of computing; data gathering and representation; logic and computational reasoning; data and procedural abstraction; problem decomposition; and code patterns for algorithmic problem-solving. Students will learn techniques to turn facts into information in an approachable way great for students from all disciplines.

 

Banned Books
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Marjory Wentworth
English
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

This course examines a variety of texts that have been banned across several centuries  and continents. Texts have been seized or outlawed, classified as taboo, their authors fined, jailed, tortured, exiled and killed throughout history under many different political regimes. The focus is literature from the past two centuries, spanning diverse cultural and political contexts, as well as some films now considered “classics.” In America, many writers of our most beloved books have experienced the sting of censorship and distorted judgement aimed at their work. Recent contempt for the news media will be examined within its unique role in our democracy. We will also incorporate contemporary First Amendment issues–especially in terms of the internet (social media).

 

Writers Change the World
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Bret Lott
English
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course times: TBA and TBA

Writers change the world. Novels, stories, poems, essays all have this in common: they transform hearts and minds; they guide us, exhort us, teach us, entertain us. What writers make reaches into the lives of readers in lasting and meaningful ways that can change the course of history. This course looks at ways to make your mark in the world of words by creating your own stories and poems and essays. Through the study of many acclaimed works and visiting guest writers, students will explore the practice of creativity and why writing matters.

The Scientist in Society
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Caroline Hunt
English
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course times: TBA and TBA

This seminar asks future science majors and non-scientists how scientists should function in their communities.  Topics include experimentation on humans, genetic engineering, and the social responsibilities of scientists. Students will focus on how to find and assess reliable information and how to communicate the results effectively. Students who have taken an earlier version of this course have found it useful in preparing for future allied health careers.

 

 

Financial Literacy for Generation Z
FYSE 115 and FYSS 101
Jocelyn Evans
Finance
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course times: TBA and TBA

Steve Cocheo, Executive Editor at The Financial Brand, states that, “Money freaks Gen Z out, creating opportunity for financial marketers." Apparently, one of the top stressors is money, followed by post-graduation employment, health-related concerns and the overall economy. The current generation enters college without much formal education in personal financial management skills, even though their college years will require them to make many decisions related to the above concerns. This course will navigate these literacy challenges. The subject matter is on money management skills, career planning, job health care options, and understanding what drives the overall economy. Academic instruction is supplemented by speakers from the university and financial industry professionals.

 

Doom and Glory: How Geology Changed Society
FYSE 117 and FYSS 101
Erin Beutel
Geology
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

Doom and Glory: How Geology Changed Society, will look at major historical events (such as the destruction of Minoan society on Thera) in the context of major geologic phenomena.  Volcanic eruptions, glaciers, rivers, climate change and more will take on a whole new persona as we examine how they changed society for better (Glory) or worse (Doom).  This course will change your perception of geology and draw you into an exciting world where good and bad reign side-by-side in the natural world.

 

From Gullah to Gujarati to Guaraní: Multilingualism and Multiculturalism Throughout the World
FYSE 120 and FYSS 101
Colleen Moorman
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

Did you know that in today's world it is more common to be bilingual or multilingual than monolingual? In this course students will investigate what it means to be multilingual and/or multicultural, the different types of multilingualism, and the ways in which culture and identity  are inextricably linked with language. The course will also explore, through a variety of media, guest  speakers, and local field trips, the diverse ways in which multilingualism exists in different regions of the world, including right here in the Lowcountry. Students will also examine how and why the confluence of diverse cultures and languages over time leads to the creation of new languages,  the modification of existing languages, and the development of bi/multilingual populations.

 

Friends and the City
FYSE 120 and FYSS 101
Susan Divine
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

Have you been friendzoned? Been in a bromance? Have any frenemies? Celebrated Galantine's day? In this course we will explore how humans have experienced and understood the phenomenon of friendship across cultures, through time, and by ourselves via philosophy and cultural narratives situated in particular spaces. For example, what is friendship to the Roman statesman, Cicero, in 100 BC? To punk-rocker Pati Smith in New York City in the 1970s? What can a 17th century collection of stories about women in Spain tell us about how we experience friendship today? And how do friendship-centered narratives such as Friends or Telephone Girls dialog with current debates on social justice in NYC and Madrid, Spain? These guiding ideas will take use through explorations of gender, sexuality and how popular culture reflects and reforms our relationships with each other and with ourselves.

 

Destinations: The Social, Economic, and Ethical Dimensions of Travel
FYSE 121 and FYSS 101
Lisa Covert
History
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

This course will explore the idea of destinations. The class will use fictional and nonfictional readings and films to examine different forms and purposes of travel: where do people go and why? Students will also consider the experiences of those who live and work in travel destinations, including the local experience in Charleston. Ultimately, the course will help students to understand how travel can be an individual process, but one that also has broader social, economic, and ethical ramifications.

 

Queer Questions: LGBTQ+ Historical Identities (Critical Conversations Course)
FYSE 121 and FYSS 101

Sandy Slater
History
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

Increased attention and activism surrounding queer communities (LGBTQ+) has stimulated vigorous conversations related to collective and individual identities within the community, as well as in relation to larger social issues.  This course, with its grounding in historical understanding of queer life and resistance, offers an opportunity to understand the contemporary debates and calls for equity and inclusion through an historical lens. Course materials include a variety of interdisciplinary materials including memoirs, literature, music, and oral histories. Focus will be on an Atlantic narrative of queerness, as much of the material focuses on American narratives, history, and debates.

 

The Exotic "Other" in American Life and Culture
FYSE 124 and FYSS 101
Ashley Walters
Jewish Studies
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

The concept of “The Other” in society is derived from relationships of power between majority and minority groups and is central to individual identity construction, politics, and social relations. This course explores the experiences of individuals understood to be “others” in American society and how perceived differences are often exoticized within American culture. Students will explore a variety of media that (mis)represents alterity and consider why some minority groups possess an exceptional appeal in American society while others do not. Special emphasis will be placed upon Black, Jewish, Indigenous, Latinx, and East Asian migrants, past and present. Students will be introduced to key concepts from feminist and gender studies, postcolonial theory, and critical race studies. They will gain a greater appreciation of how human relationships are mediated by social constructs of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, class, sexuality, and able-bodiedness.

 

Bad Hombres/Spicy Vixens: Exploring Latino/a Stereotypes in the United States
FYSE 125 and FYSS 101
Nadia Avendaño
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

This seminar introduces students to the field of Latino/a Studies in order to better understand the place of Latinos in U.S. politics, history, and culture. Students will be asked to examine how a heterogeneous and changing Latino/a population both shapes and is shaped by life in the United States. A selection of texts from various disciplines (including literature, history, music, and film) will inform our class discussions. The course will look at constructions of “Latinidad” as they relate to questions of identity, class, race, and/or ethnicity, religion, gender and sexuality, (im)migration, language, and popular culture.

 

Emerging Adulthood: The Age of Possibilities
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Amy Kolak
Psychology
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

In this course, we will review research, theory, and practice related to Emerging Adulthood (a relatively new term that is being applied to individuals between 19 and 29 in primarily industrialized countries). The variety of factors, including social, economic, and psychological, that are related to the emergence of this new developmental period, along with its impact on society, will be discussed. Research on the various domains (i.e. school, work, love, family, and identity) of emerging adults’ lives will be examined. Finally, we will explore individual behaviors and contexts that may be associated with the successful navigation of this period.

 

Inclusive Visions of Sustainability for the 21st Century
FYSE 134 and FYSS 101
Todd LeVasseur
Humanities and Social Sciences
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

This course highlights and explores the sustainability work of black, indigenous, Latinx, and other communities of color. Students will explore past and present entrepreneurial, justice, and environmental work as these relate to the social, environmental, and economic issues of the 21st century and how communities of color are mobilizing to address and solve these issues.  The course is a mix of investigating both domestic and international case studies, watching documentaries, engaging various readings, participating in lectures, and undertaking community engagement all directed towards developing a better understanding of and articulating an inclusive, non-White vision of sustainability that can adequately solve the interconnected problems facing our future.

 

American Popular Culture (sections A-B)
FYSE 135 and FYSS 101
Paul Roof
Sociology
(A) CRNs: TBA and TBA
(A) Course Times: TBA and TBA
(B) CRNs: TBA and TBA
(B) Course Times: TBA and TBA

This course is designed to introduce students to critical analysis of contemporary popular culture in the United States.  Students will get an overview of the insights, findings, concepts, and perspectives that are held by a wide variety of interdisciplinary popular culture scholars today.  Several prominent areas of popular culture to be studied include: advertising, television, film, music, religion, and cyberculture

 

Revolutionary Poets Society: Slam Poetry, Spoken Word, and Adolescent Life
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
W. Ian O’Byrne
Teacher Education
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

The Revolutionary Poets Society focuses on global opportunities to respond to the demands of the moment through poetry, music and art. Here you will learn about the roots of slam poetry – the Harlem Renaissance, Confessional & Beat poetry, the Black Arts Movement, performance art, and hip-hop. You will develop a vocabulary and a set of critical, literacy, and performance approaches that will enable you to engage with slam poems and spoken-word poems on their own aesthetic terms. This course will include the development and sharing of your work and content openly online. You will be required to present your work and poetry openly online and in other public spaces throughout the semester.

 

Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Susan Flynn
Teacher Education
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics course is designed to provide students interested in pursuing a degree in occupational and physical therapy as well as teacher education, with the knowledge and skills to design and implement movement experiences to enhance children's physical, social and emotional development. Students will participate in the FitCatZ Aquatic and Motor Program putting theory to practice teaching young children in a therapy setting. Students will be required to go to an off-site pool facility during scheduled class times for 9 of the semester class sessions.  Students will need at least 45 minutes of travel time before 3:00 p.m on Wednesdays.

 

Exploring Cultural Strengths and Diversity through Storytelling
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Renard Harris
Teacher Education
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA
 
Whether real or imagined, stories make us who we are. Stories inform us of our past, support our present, and shape our futures. Culture, or “ways of being”, influence the way we share and interpret stories, and our cultural differences give each of us a lens to see and understand the world around us. The way an individual speaks, carries him/herself, responds to the mundane and reacts to the unfamiliar is founded in the stories of that individual’s cultural strengths. These cultural strengths can be used to navigate oneself through social and academic spaces. This course is about the art of storytelling to express one’s cultural strengths and the opportunity to share in a diverse community.


Schooled: Exploring Anti-Racism, Inclusion, and Equity Through Children's Literature
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Margaret Hagood
Teacher Education
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA
 
Reading literature is a staple of K-12 education. Which children’s books about American history did you read in K-12 schooling? How did they influence your understanding of history, race, bias, and stereotypes? Children’s books reflect societal attitudes about diversity, power relations, and various identities (racial, ethnic, gender, class, ability). This course examines perspectives from American history often omitted in K-12 schooling using children’s literature. Topics covered include ethnic cleansing, reconstruction, assimilation of “immigrants,” the juvenile justice system, eugenics, Jim Crow and segregation, internment camps, Freedom schools, standardized testing, and the school to prison pipeline. Participants will learn to critically analyze children’s literature and reflect on their own educational experiences and understanding of history from literature read. 

 

Live Happy and Healthy
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Susan Flynn
Teacher Education
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

Living a rewarding and happy life requires balance and focus. Many people fail to realize this, and instead focus their energies on only a few dimensions of wellness creating an imbalance. This course assists students in realizing the direct correlation between positive lifestyle habits and well-being through the dimensions of wellness and the connection to public health sustainabilityissues.Wellnessandpersonalsustainabilitywillbeconnectedtotheimprovement of oneself and thecommunity.

 

Theatre’s Visual Language
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Janine McCabe
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

Images can communicate ideas as strongly as words. When we watch plays, movies, TV, or even walk down the street; the colors, lines and style of all we see has an impact.  Visual communication is a crucial element in the collaborative process of creating theatre. This seminar will explore and analyze the way theatre design teams communicate visually and verbally in the process of developing a production.  Students will see plays, meet designers and directors, and collaborate with each other to understand the communicative power of images.

 

Hollywood and History: Costume Design in Film
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Glenda Byars
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

This course explores fashion history as revealed and interpreted by costume designers for motion pictures from the early 20th century to present. The choices of the designers will be analyzed in connection to historical images of the time represented and the fashions of the time in which the film was created. Through this process, students will learn about the costume design process and how research is conducted and applied to costume design for films and plays that are set in historical eras.

 

Female Action Figures on the Screen
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Evan Parry
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course times: TBA and TBA

If a woman wields a gun is she strong?  If a woman is physically aggressive is she an empowered woman, or is she just acting like a man? Why have women of physical action, even “violence” been traditionally regarded as unacceptable or abnormal? Are there motives that justify such violence? Is a violent (or simply physically strong) woman more acceptable now than 30 years ago? Is such a woman more or less acceptable in America than elsewhere? Through the viewing of a variety of films, this course will explore answers to these questions by critically evaluating the way in which female action figures are constructed both visually and thematically on the screen.

 

Connecting with Nature in the Modern World
FYSE 142 and FYSS 101
Nick Principe
Environmental Studies
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

We know that spending quality time in nature can quickly wash away the worries of the day and if done regularly, can improve our well-being. The question is, if nature is so beneficial for us, then why are we a nation of people who seem to be more uncoupled from nature than ever before? In this course, students will examine ways in which we can connect with the natural world around us, both individually and as a society. The class will explore research on the effects of nature on mental well-being, the state of modern food production, and how reconnecting with nature might just give us a fighting chance against biodiversity loss and the effects of climate change.

 

AR You Experienced: Augmented & Virtual Reality for Travel & Adventure
FYSE 143 and FYSS 101
Joey Van Arnhem
College of Charleston Libraries
CRNs: TBA and TBA
Course Times: TBA and TBA

In this course, students will examine the topics of travel and adventure. Students will consider travel-related literature and examine the technologies behind augmented and virtual reality that can help them explore the historical and societal effects of travel and exploration over the decades.  Allowing students first-hand experiences through a variety of technologies can provide learning opportunities they may not have access to otherwise. Students will have the opportunity to engage in a changing world view and will demonstrate analytic and critical thinking by approaching contemporary travel and adventure texts presented through the lens of augmented and virtual realities.