Fall 2022

 

Students choose to complete either a Learning Community or a First Year Seminar to complete the FYE graduation requirement.

Learning Communities (LC) link two academic courses (6-8 credit hours). Faculty teaching these courses work together to establish joint activities and common curriculum themes designed to explore the ways in which subjects are interrelated. All Learning Communities fulfill the FYE graduation requirement in addition to counting towards other general education requirements (listed with each LC).

First Year Seminar (FYSE) is an academic course (3 credit hours) that explores special topics taught by outstanding faculty.

All FYE courses have an attached Synthesis Seminar (FYSS). Upperclassmen serve as peer facilitators and lead weekly 50-minute synthesis seminars tfhat introduce students to the College’s academic community. The synthesis seminar component offers the advantage of getting the perspective of and advice from a successful College of Charleston student.

Students must be enrolled in all parts of their Learning Community (including all science labs) or First-Year Seminar to receive credit.

Information about online courses, when applicable: 

Online courses are indicated as such and are listed as either Synchronous (SYNC) or Asynchronous (ASYNC).

  •   Synchronous online course class meetings are facilitated during the times they are listed, and students and faculty may interface in real-time via Zoom or other video-sharing software methods.
  •   Asynchronous online courses will not meet during a regularly scheduled time for class meetings.

Most courses will be in-person unless labeled as online.

Race, Equity, and Inclusion
These courses were specifically proposed as part of the REI iniative and have a historical, narrative, applied, analytical, and/or geographic focus in either the US or global context
Living in Community: The Psychology of Oppression, Resistance, & Regeneration
What American Literature Can Teach Us about Race, Equity, and Inclusion
How to Survive an Apocalypse
Divas, Drag Queens, and Deities Across the Americas
Race, Culture, and Identity on Broadway

Countries and Cultures, Past and Present
Black Lives
Mangia! Eating and Speaking Like an Italian
French Culture and the City of Charleston
Experiencing Ancient Rome
Talking Spanish, Thinking Sociology
¡Conoce España: Comunidades, Costumbres, y Cocina!
Barcelona and the Mediterranean Coast
Israel through Film and Media
Business and Popular Culture: America vs. Brazil
American Popular Culture

Experiencing Charleston and the Lowcountry
History, Built Here: Architecture and Historic Preservation in the Holy City
Sending the 'Write' Message: Managing Tourism in Charleston
The 1967 Legacy and Beyond
From Christopher Columbus to Contemporary Charleston: History, Politics and Memory

Engaging with Society through Contemporary Issues and Relationships
The Human Side of Sustainability
Planes, Plagues, and Politics: What's Globalization Got to Do with Public Health?
Fake Media or Watchdogs for Democracy? News Media and Elections
Why Business? The Role of Business in Society
Reading and Writing Social Justice
Psychology of Travel
Emerging Adulthood: The Age of Possibilities
Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: More Than Just a Movie
Visualizing your World: Data and Storytelling

Exploration of Self, Identity, and Development
Dancing Away Your Fear of Public Speaking
Psychology of Women's Studies and Gender Issues
Food for Thought
Intriguing Questions. Interesting Answers. Illustrious Readings
Queer Questions: LGBTQ+ Historical Identities
The Professional Learner: Developing Your Personal Brand
Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics
Voices of Diversity: Playwrights and Characters
Travel for Transformation: Journeys of (Self) Discovery

Exploration of Technology, Science, and Nature
Engineering: Perspectives and Communication
From Russia with Code: Cybersecurity and Russian
An Earth Without Us!
Charleston Earthquakes, Hurricanes, Floods, and Artillery!
Preparing Computing Professionals
Gateway to Neuroscience
Human Diseases in the Spanish-Speaking World
Structure Determines Function: The Convergence of Biology and Yoga
Pandemics in Human History, Present and Future
Computers, Music, and Art
Interpreting our National Treasures: From Parks to Moon Rocks
Sprechen Sie Business? German Technology in South Carolina and Beyond
Information Revolutions
iHuman
Hurricanes and Their Impacts on Society
Solvable: Scientific Solutions for the Past, Present, and Future
Connecting with Nature in the Modern World
Biology and Precalculus for Pre-Med Students

Engaging Our World through the Arts, Literature, and Religion
Visual Culture: Page and Screen
Play/Write
New Ways of Seeing: Producing Art in Contemporary Culture
Comics and American Culture
Banned Books
From Sherlock Holmes to Selena Gomez: Detective Fiction and Its Descendants
The Story of Now: Writing Fiction on Our World
Harry Potter and the Human Condition
The Holocaust on Screen
Healing Journeys
Dancing on Stage and Screen: Investigating the Perspective of the Artist and Audience


 

Learning Communities:

Black Lives (LC1)
AAST 200: Intro to African American Studies and AFST 101 Intro to African Studies and FYSS 101
Avinash Hingorani and Christopher Day
African American Studies and Political Science
6 Humanities credits
CRNs: 13024 and 15237 and 16487
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and TR 10:50-12:05 and M 10:00-10:50

This FYE will investigate and explain the concept of “Black Lives” from the combined perspective of African American Studies and African Studies. The effort to explore this important intersection will build upon a key component of our collective identity at the College of Charleston, which is the unique and essential vantage point from which to study the historical, cultural, and material connections between Africa, the particular experience of the Carolina Lowcountry, and the African American experience more generally.

 

Architectural History and Historic Preservation in the Holy City (LC2)
ARTH 105: Intro to Architecture and HPCP 199: Intro to Historic Preservation and FYSS 101
Brigit Ferguson and Ashton Finley
Art History and Historic Preservation
6 Humanities credits
CRNS: 16488 and 14975 and 16489
Course Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and MWF 11:00-11:50 and W 5:00-5:50

Using Charleston as a living laboratory, this LC will introduce students to architectural
history and historic preservation. Introduction to Architectural History explores Western architecture from ancient Mesopotamia to the 21st century in terms of function, structure, form, and historical context. The historic preservation portion introduces students to the economic, environmental and cultural benefits of preservation of our built environment while also addressing issues in heritage management using Charleston examples and studying local buildings in situ. Students will write stylistic analyses, learn basic architectural terminology and research architectural and historic significance using primary sources. The LC will include site visits to buildings across Charleston.


The Human Side of Sustainability (LC3)
ANTH 115: Intro to Cultural Sustainability and SOCY 102: Contemporary Social Issues and FYSS 101
Christine Finnan and Tracy Burkett
Anthropology and Sociology
3 elective credits and 3 Social Science credits
CRNS: 14700 and 15241 and 16490
Course Times:  TR 12:15-1:30 and TR 1:40-2:55 and M 2:00-2:50

This Learning Community focuses on the human side of sustainability. We examine social and cultural factors that play a part in efforts to create a just, equitable, and healthy world. ANTH 115: Introduction to Cultural Sustainability provides an introduction to cultural anthropology and sustainability literacy, and it places cultural sustainability within economic, environmental, and social issues. SOCY 102: Contemporary Social Issues provides an introduction to sociology and examines social and organizational issues related to sustainability, with a special focus on inequality and strategies for change. Students have the opportunity to become involved in the Sustainability Literacy Institute and potentially identify opportunities for future internships or research projects. Successful completion of these courses will fulfill one required and one elective course for the Cultural Sustainability Certificate.

 

Visual Culture: Page and Screen (LC4)*
ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and ENGL 212: Cinema: History and Criticism and FYSS 101
Tim Carens and Colleen Glenn
English and Film Studies
4 English and 3 Humanities credits
CRNS: 16493 and 16494 and 16495
Course Times:  MW 4:00-5:15 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and MW 2:00-3:15 and M 11:00-11:50
*Contact your advisor during registration to get an override for the required prerequisites

This Learning Community will help students to better understand central forms of visual culture including advertisements, messaging campaigns, television programs, and cinema. It will emphasize the ways that such media convey ideas, construct attitudes, and entertain minds. In ENGL 110, students will learn how to develop arguments about different forms of visual media by focusing on the explanation of the ways that language and images create meaning. In ENGL 212, students will study movies from a wide range of genres, directors, and time periods and learn the basic elements of film, including editing, cinematography, sound, mise-en-scène, and narrative.

 

 

Play/Write (LC 5)
ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and THTR 176: Intro to Theatre and FYSS 101
Laura Cannon and Laura Turner
English and Theatre and Dance
4 English and 3 Humanities credits
CRNS: 16496 and 16497 and 16498
Course Times:  MWF 1:00-1:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and TR 9:25-10:40 and R 11:05-11:55

How does theatre entrance an audience? How can you write, perform, and persuade in ways that capture attention and move hearts and minds? In this Learning Community, students will analyze how theatre, narrative, and rhetoric use similar strategies to communicate effectively with distinct audiences and under particular constraints. In THTR 176, students will explore how to respond critically to live performance and written scripts, how to develop the capacity to empathize through exposure to diverse theatrical histories, and how to articulate the connection of their own experiences when joined with an audience at the theatre. In ENGL 110, students will explore how they acquired specific forms of literacy, how to understand the rhetorical situation of drama, performance, and writing; and how to remediate their creative and analytical projects to reach new audiences.

 

 

Engineering: Perspectives and Communication (LC6A-B)
ENGR 103: Fundamentals of Electrical and Systems Engineering and ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Qian Zhang and Caroline Hunt
Engineering and English
3 elective credits and 4 English credits
(A) CRNS: 16499 and 16502 and 16503
(A) Course Times: TR 8:00-9:15 and MWF 10:00-10:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and T 1:05-1:55
(B) CRNS: 16504 and 16505 and 16508
(B) Course Times: TR 8:00-9:15 and MWF 12:00-12:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and W 1:00-1:50

In this learning community, students will be able to learn engineering fundamentals, international perspectives on engineering, and some of the multicultural understanding and teamwork skills necessary for professional collaboration. Students are also expected to develop an appreciation towards diversity. Students will also learn about the important role communication plays in enabling the success of engineering projects and in modern technology-driven life including politics, the economy, culture, and the environment

 

Mangia! Eating and Speaking Like an Italian (LC7)
HEAL 257: Principles of Nutrition and ITAL 101: Elementary Italian and FYSS 101
Michelle Futrell and Virginia Carlsten
Health and Human Performance and Italian Studies
3 elective credits and 3 foreign language credits
CRNS: 14608 and 13214 and 16509
Course Times: ONLINE ASYNC and MWF 2:00-2:50 and W 3:00-3:50

Food brings people together and this learning community will use the study of food to connect the traditional introductory Italian classroom with the online Principles of Nutrition classroom. The overarching focus of this learning community will be the Mediterranean Diet, recognized as the best overall diet for the third year in a row by US News & World Report. The learning community combines the science behind current dietary guidelines with an examination of the cultural importance of food in the lives of everyday Italians. The Learning Community will provide students with an opportunity to understand their own personal dietary habits in comparison with those of the greater Italian population. Students will also complete one semester of their language requirement.

 

From Russia with Code: Cybersecurity and Russian (LC8)
RUSS 101: Elementary Russian I and CSCI 111: Intro to Cybersecurity and FYSS 101
Meglena Miltcheva and Lancie Affonso
Russian and Computer Science
3 foreign language and 3 elective credits
CRNS: 13144 and 14297 and 16510
Course Times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and 10:00-10:50 and M 1:00-1:50

In recent years, Russian cybercrime has become the most dangerous threat to the US computer security systems. Government and businesses are scrambling to find Cybersecurity experts who specialize in Russian. This learning community helps you to acquire this much-needed expertise in the connections between Russia and Cybersecurity. RUSS 101 introduces the Cyrillic alphabet and Russian language, with a focus on computer vocabulary. CSCI 111 focuses on the domains of cybersecurity with specific examples applied to the Russian attacks. We will cover the following domain areas and touch on specific Russian attacks that penetrated the area in question: Access control and identity management, cryptography, policies, procedures, and awareness, physical security, perimeter defenses, network defenses, host defenses, application defenses, and data defenses.

 

 

French Culture and the City of Charleston (LC10)
FRCS 101: French Cultural Studies and FREN 101: Beginning French Through Culture 1 and FYSS 101
Katharine Hargrave and Margaret Keneman
French and French
3 Humanities and 3 foreign language credits
CRNS: 13196 and 14930 and 16512
Course Times: MWF 12:00-12:50 and TR 3:05-4:20 and M 4:00-4:50

You know that Charleston is a historic city rich in European culture, but how much of it is influenced by France? Join this experiential learning community to find out! Because the beautiful city of Charleston is at our doorstep, we not only learn about but also VISIT sites such as the French Quarter, the Huguenot Church, French family archives at the Charleston Library Society, a Chartres inspired labyrinth, Le Creuset Atelier, and of course the sights, sounds, smells and TASTES of some delicious French restaurants. You will also take FREN 101 which will add an enhanced linguistic component to the experience while you learn about French cultural practices related to history, religion, healthcare, business, art, literature, education, family life, cuisine and more!

 

An Earth Without Us! (LC11)
GEOL 103: Environmental Geology and GEOL 103L: Environmental Geology Lab and ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Michael Scott Harris and McKayla Watkins
Geology and English
4 natural science and 4 English credits
CRNs: 16513 and 16514 and 16515 and 16516
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and M 2:30-5:30 and TR 3:05-4:20 (Online Class Meetings for 4th hour) and T 6:05-6:55

In this Learning Community, students will explore how human-Earth interactions have ushered in the Anthropocene era, the recent period where humans have had a dominant influence on Earth’s environment. Experiential learning activities (directed research assignments and a field trip) will allow students to apply Earth science principles to evaluate our unsustainable use of Earth’s resources and predict the future of our planet.  The famous poem, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" asks, “Do I dare to eat a peach?”  Maybe.  But what about a glass of almond milk?  Students will write about humanity’s sustaining (or failing to sustain) the legacy we share with future generations: the Earth.  They will practice the art of persuasion: how to evaluate and how to write effective arguments about our interaction with the natural world.  From their own personal perspectives, from the perspective of Earth science, and from their research, students will ask and answer the big question: how should we live our lives?

 

Charleston Earthquakes, Hurricanes, Floods, and Artillery! (LC12)
GEOL 103: Environmental Geology and GEOL 103L: Environmental Geology Lab and DATA 210: Dataset Organization and Management and FYSS 101
Steven Jaume and Lancie Affonso
Geology and Computer Science
4 natural science and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 16517 and 16518 and 14476 and 16519
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and T 1:45-4:45 and MWF 9:00-9:50 and M 3:00-3:50

Earthquakes, Hurricanes, Floods, Fires! Natural disasters have defined Charleston’s 350-year history and will likely frame its future. The linked courses (GEOL 103 and DATA 210) will introduce students to publicly available environmental data (e.g., streamflow, tide gauge, meteorological, earthquake, etc.) and several means of analyzing and interpreting these natural phenomena. Students who complete this course will be able to support transparent environmental decision-making and digital storytelling that promotes open data and analysis along with rich interactive visualizations that enable users a high level view of complex problems as well as deep dive into the data. There are no prerequisites for courses in this learning community.


Experiencing Ancient Rome (LC13)
LATN 101: Intro to Latin and CLAS 105: Roman Civilization and FYSS 101
Andrew Alwine and Jen Gerrish
Classics
3 foreign language and 3 Humanities credits
CRNs: 13247 and 15380 and 16521
Course times: MWF 12:00-12:50 and TR 8:00-9:15 and W 9:00-9:50

Come learn about the Romans through their language, literature, archaeology, and art.  Students will learn to read simple passages about Roman history and culture and understand how the Romans’ language communicates ideas. Students will study the basics of Greek and Roman history, religion, architecture, art, entertainment, and social  customs. Readings in both classes will highlight connections between language and  culture, and you’ll truly get to experience ancient Rome from multiple angles.

 

Preparing Computing Professionals (LC14)*
CSCI 220: Computer Programming I and CSCI 220L (Lab) and COMM 104: Public Speaking and FYSS 101
RoxAnn Stalvey and Nia Lewis
Computer Science and Communication
7 elective credits
CRNs: 16244 and 16522 and 16523 and 16524
Course times: TR 11:20-12:35 and W 2:00-4:30 and MWF 9:00-9:50 (ONLINE SYNC) and M 1:00-1:50

Sometimes it’s not what you say, but how you say it! The number one technical skill needed by computing academics and professionals is programming while the number one soft skill needed by this same group is communication. In addition to learning to code, it is important to perfect listening abilities and become knowledgeable about how to share information both verbally and non-verbally. This learning community will merge the fields of Computer Science and Communication to introduce students to programming and problem solving using Python and to teach students how to effectively articulate themselves in a variety of public speaking situations, from interviews, to professional presentations.
*Contact your advisor during registration to get an override into this class

 

Gateway to Neuroscience (LC15 A-B)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and PSYC 103: Intro to Psychological Science and FYSS 101
Chris Korey and Dan Greenberg
Biology and Psychology
4 natural science and 3 social science credits
(A) CRNs: 16531 and 13110 and 16532 and 16537
(A) Course times: MWF 8:00-8:50 and T 4:35-7:35 and TR 10:50-12:05 and F 2:00-2:50
(B) CRNs: 16533 and 13102 and 16534 and 16538
(B) Course times: MWF 8:00-8:50 and T 1:35-4:35 and TR 10:50-12:05 and M 10:00-10:50

This learning community is aimed at entering first-year students with an interest in Neuroscience, particularly the interface of Psychology and Biology. These courses will demonstrate and reinforce the inherent, extensive connections between the two disciplines. PSYC 103 will introduce students to the science of behavior with special emphasis on the biological bases of behavior (neuroscience) and psychological disorders. BIOL 111 focuses on molecular and cellular biology, with a focus on basic nervous system function and the underlying biological mechanisms associated with neurological disorders.

 

Planes, Plagues, and Politics: What's Globalization Got to Do with Public Health? (LC16)
HEAL 215: Intro to Public Health and INTL 100: Intro to International Studies and FYSS 101
Sarah Maness and Kristen McLean
Health and Human Performance and International Studies
3 elective credits and 3 Humanities credits
CRNs: 16535 and 16536 and 16539
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and MWF 10:00-10:50 and F 2:00-2:50 

The goal of this learning community is to further students’ understanding of globalization and its relationship to public health. This is especially important as the world becomes increasingly interconnected, and as the challenges associated with the prevention and containment of public health problems continue to grow, as evidenced by the current Covid-19 pandemic.  Students will learn the basic tenets and applications of public health, including the history of public health, an overview of core disciplines, and current events and issues, within the context of a global perspective. Students will learn about global political, economic, and cultural connections by examining topics such as migration, environmentalism, human rights, economic inequality, and global health.

 

Sending the ‘Write’ Message: Managing Tourism in Charleston (LC17 A-B-C-D)
HTMT 210: Principles and Practices in Hospitality and Tourism Management and ENGL 110: Introduction to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Brumby McLeod and Ariel Hartwig
Hospitality and Tourism Management and English
3 elective credits and 4 English credits
(A) CRNs: 16562 and 16563 and 16561
(A) Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and MWF 9:00-9:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and W 11:00-11:50
(B) CRNs: 16540 and 16560 and 16567
(B) Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and MWF 10:00-10:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and W 1:00-1:50
(C) CRNs: 16565 and 16566 and 16564
(C) Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and MWF 12:00-12:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and W 2:00-2:50
(D) CRNs: 16568 and 16569 and 16570
(D) Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and MWF 12:00-12:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and W 2:00-2:50

The purpose of this learning community is to explore how to conduct business in the hospitality industry. Special attention will be paid on how to communicate ideas and strategies effectively throughout both the industry and the community. This class will introduce students to the hospitality environment and guide them in developing professional skills through writing business correspondences such as memos, reports, résumés and cover letters as well as creative and analytical features focusing on industry issues. Students will explore Charleston and all its offerings to understand how the tourism industry works in one of the world’s premier destinations.

 

Dancing Away Your Fear of Public Speaking (LC18)
COMM 104 and PEAC 122 and FYSS 101
Deborah McGee and Jeff Woraratanadharm
Communication and Health and Human Performance
5 elective credits
CRNs: 16571 and 16572 and 16573
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and TR 5:45-7:00 and W 3:00-3:50

Dancing Away Your Fear of Public Speaking is a learning community designed to improve students' ability to communicate, especially in situations in which they are in the spotlight. Both public speaking and social dance are communication skills that will benefit one’s personal and professional lives. Students will learn how to manage stage-fright through dancing and speaking. Students will also learn to adapt to audiences and better evaluate the messaging of others as they learn how to express themselves through voice and body.

 

Psychology of Women’s Studies and Gender Issues (LC19 A-B)
PSYC 103: Intro to Psychological Science and WGST 200: Intro to Women's and Gender Studies and FYSS 101
Jennifer Wright and Lisa Ross
Psychology and Women and Gender Studies
3 social science and 3 humanities credits
(A) CRNs: 16574 and 16575 and 16576
(A) Course Times: TR 1:40-2:55 and TR 8:00-9:15 and W 3:00-3:50
(B) CRNs: 16577 and 16578 and 16579
(B) Course Times: TR 1:40-2:55 and TR 8:00-9:15 and W 1:00-1:50

Students in this learning community will explore the foundations of psychology, with an eye to how basic neurological and psychological processes (learning, memory, perception, social cognition) help us to understand various gender, race, class, and sexual orientation issues. We’ll also look closely at the development of gender and sexual orientation and the influence that biological, familial, and cultural factors have on developmental trajectories.  From the Women’s and Gender Studies side we will discuss historical and contemporary feminism, race, class, and sexual orientation, along with a variety of gender-related issues – e.g., eating disorders, sexual harassment, rape, pregnancy, and sexual reproduction, etc. Our discussions will continue to highlight the importance of various psychological processes for understanding these issues.

 

Talking Spanish, Thinking Sociology (LC20)
SOCY 101: Intro to Sociology and SPAN 190: Elementary Spanish through Culture I and FYSS 101
Julia Arroyo and Berenice Marquina Castillo
Sociology and Hispanic Studies
3 social science and 3 foreign language credits
CRNs: 16580 and 16581 and 16582
Course times:  MWF 10:00-10:50 and MWF 9:00-9:50 and M 12:00-12:50

This learning community uses culture as an entryway for building your ability to speak and write en español and to observe, think, and act “like a sociologist”. Designed for students who have been exposed to Spanish and for anyone who has ever wondered why people act the way they do, this learning community helps students become aware of and grow their thinking, speaking, and writing skills in Spanish and English through a focus on culture and everyday life. Studying cultural diversity (such as in definitions of family) and inequality (such as in access to quality education), students will improve their ability to identify and describe how social forces shape views, experiences, and behaviors. Along the way, students will develop a broader understanding of cultures of Spanish-speaking countries and Latinx-origin groups in the United States.

 

 

Human Diseases in the Spanish-Speaking World (LC21)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and SPAN 202: Intermediate Spanish through Culture and FYSS 101
Renaud Geslain and Claudia Moran
Biology and Hispanic Studies
4 natural science and 3 foreign language credits
CRNs: 16583 and 14397 and 16780 and 16586
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and W 1:35-4:35 and TR 3:05-4:20 and M 1:00-1:50

Are you interested in a future career in public health that taps into your Spanish skills? This Learning Community links BIOL111 and SPAN 202 and will explore predominant human health issues in the Spanish-speaking world. In BIOL 111, students will explore the molecular and cellular aspects of viral, bacterial and non-contagious diseases that are prevalent in Latin America such as HIV, Malaria, TB, Chagas disease, Dengue, Zika, Chikungunya and cancer. In SPAN 202, students will learn Spanish vocabulary surrounding these diseases. 

 

New Ways of Seeing: Producing Art in Contemporary Culture (LC22)*
ARTS 220: Sculpture I and ARTS 119: Drawing I and FYSS 101
Jarod Charzewski and Steve Johnson
Studio Art
6 elective credits
CRNs:16587 and 16588 and 16589
Course times: TR 9:00-10:50 and TR 11:30am-1:20pm and M 9:00-9:50
*Contact your advisor during registration to get an override into this class

This learning community will be a studio art collaboration between Sculpture I and Drawing I. Its purpose is to introduce the study of 2D and 3D art production as they are created in contemporary society. The term “Contemporary” will be defined as happening right now. This means techniques, concepts, and subject matters covered in this class will be accompanied by current examples from the art world and our global culture. We will place emphasis on professional practice through lectures, gallery visits, and visiting artists. These will also function as our connections to the art world. Through critiques students will learn the empowerment of language and critical discourse as we discuss materials, skill, aspects of form, space and presentation.

 

Sprechen Sie Business Tech? German Technology in South Carolina and Beyond (LC23)*
GRMN 101: Elementary German and INFM 220: Management Information Systems and FYSS 101
Stephen Della Lana and Iris Junglas
German and Supply Chain and Information Management
3 foreign language credits and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 16590 and 14678 and 16591
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and TR 10:50-12:05 and M 1:00-1:50

German business is a global phenomenon with a tremendous local economic impact on the US and especially in South Carolina. There are over 200 German companies based in SC alone and over 40,000 jobs stem from German industry in the state! Given that German IT systems are a leader in the market, our learning community will explore the lucrative connections and career opportunities at the intersection of Management Information Systems and German. INFM 220 will provide an overview of information systems with an emphasis on building technological skills with some of the most prominent software applications, while German 101 will introduce students to the German language with an emphasis on business communication and etiquette as well as technological terminology.

 

From Christopher Columbus to Contemporary Charleston: History, Politics and Memory (LC 24)
POLI 101: American Government and HIST 116: Modern History and FYSS 101
Lynne Ford and Lisa Covert
Political Science and History
3 social science credits and 3 history credits
CRNs: 16683 and 16112 and 16685
Course Times: TR 8:00-9:15 and TR 9:25-10:40 and W 2:00-2:50

In telling the story of a nation’s founding, a political victory or crisis, a community's rise or fall, what do we choose to remember and what do we choose to forget? This learning community explores the role of memory, memorialization, and forgetting in building the narratives of world history and the “American experiment.” In HIST 116, students will explore topics such as imperialism, authoritarianism, slavery and war and grapple with the political and economic implications of history and how it is commemorated, represented or erased. In POLI 101, students will study the founding and political development of American government, paying careful attention to the way our political culture is created, replicated, and sustained around key principles of individualism, liberty, equality, property, order and the rule of law. We will explore the role of memory as a force that unites and divides the American people throughout history and today. Students will have the opportunity to visit and analyze historical sites around Charleston.

 
Structure Determines Function: The Convergence of Biology and Yoga (LC 25)
BIOL 101: Concepts and Applications in Biology I and BIOL 101L: Concepts and Applications in Biology I Lab and PEAC 102: Beginning Yoga
Miranda McManus and Ashley Bell
Biology and Health and Human Performance
4 natural science credits and 2 elective credits
CRNs: 16651 and 14654 and 13821 and 16652
Course Times: TR 1:40-2:55 and M 1:35-4:35 and MWF 11:00-11:50 and W 4:00-4:50

In this learning community, we will explore how, through the study of life and the practice of yoga, basic levels of structure impact overall function. In Yoga, students will experiment with a range of postures, learning to be mindful of each pose on a micro and macro level and recognizing relationships between inhale and exhale, stability and mobility, body and mind, individual and universal.  These structures provide perspective into how we function on and off the mat, leading to an enhanced capacity to meet the challenges of life as a first-year student. In Biology, we will focus primarily below the cellular (micro) level, where the properties of life begin to emerge.  We will examine the structure of molecules like proteins and DNA and how they interact within living things, exploring how simple structure impacts complex function at the macro (organismal) level and contributes to the extensive diversity we see throughout the biosphere.
*BIOL 101 is for non-science majors

 

Biology and Precalculus for Pre-Med Students (LC26)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and MATH 111: Precalculus
Emily Giarrocco and Wendy Sheppard
Biology and Mathematics
4 natural science credits and 4 math credits
CRNs: 14716 and 13107 and 13463 and 16681
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and R 1:35-4:35 and MWF 11:00-11:50 and T 12:15-1:30 and T 3:05-3:55

This learning community is tailored to incoming first-year students with a strong desire to pursue a career in medicine or in biomedical research. The fields of Math and Biology are increasingly intertwined. Faculty will use these two introductory courses to demonstrate the natural connections between the fields.

 

 

First-Year Seminars:

 

Pandemics in Human History, Present and Future
FYSE 108 and FYSS 101
Agnes Southgate
Biology
CRNs: 16397 and 16398
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and W 10:00-10:50

Pandemics have always been parts and shapers of human evolution and history, however the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemics caught most of us by surprise. In this seminar we will investigate viral biology and the human immune response to better understand the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on our health, but we will also reevaluate this pandemic in the light of past human encounters with microbes. We will discuss ways by which our global human society can fend this current crisis better, as well as prepare for the ones to come with an emphasis on global health in the context of ecological awareness and sustainability.

 

Comics and American Culture
FYSE 111 and FYSS 101
Julie Davis
Communication
CRNs: 16399 and 16400
Course Times: TR 10:50-12:05 and M 9:00-9:50

Perhaps no other art form has been as critically maligned, and yet as popular and influential as comics. Beginning in newspaper comic strips in the 1890’s, branching out into stand-alone books and magazines, and now spreading through many aspects of American culture, comics have and continue to create, reflect, and disseminate American culture. This course will study comics’ history and industry, as well as different genres of comics. Students will learn how comics come together, read a variety of comics, and critically engage them, through both discussion and written work. Topics will include the history or comics; various genres of comics; politics and comics; gender and comics; and comic transitions, which see comic stories and characters moving into other media.

 

Fake Media or Watchdogs for Our Democracy? News Media and Elections
FYSE 111 and FYSS 101
Namjin Lee
Communication
CRNs: 16401 and 16402
Course Times: MW 3:25-4:40 and W 2:00-2:50

Are news media just biased actors that disseminate “fake news” or truthful watchdogs for our democracy? This course explores the role of media (both mass and social) in the democratic election process. In particular, we will use the upcoming 2022 midterm elections as “laboratories” for examining how the media shapes public opinion and influences election outcomes. Students will closely observe the election process mainly through candidate debates, campaign commercials, news coverage, social media campaigns, and various entertainment shows. By sharing such observations and experiences, this class will seek to determine whether various forms of media facilitate “crosstalk” between candidates and the public, thereby helping voters make an informed choice that reflects their values and interests. This course is schedule as a hybrid with both in-person and online meetings.

 

Computers, Music, and Art
FYSE 112 and FYSS 101
Bill Manaris
Computer Science
CRNs: 16403 and 16404
Course Times: MW 9:30-10:20 and M 3:00-3:50

This course introduces the creative side of computing in the context of music, sounds,
images, and other digital artifacts. Emphasis will be given to computer programming for
music making, live performance, and interaction. Students will develop several digital
artifacts and elementary musical compositions.

 

Why Business? The Role of Business in Society
FYSE 113 and FYSS 101
Peter Calcagno
Economics
CRNs: 16405 and 16406
Course Times: TR 10:50-12:05 and R 9:05-9:55

This course provides an important framework for an introduction to understanding the role of business in society and addresses student’s professional lives after graduation. Students will explore how voluntary exchange in the marketplace allows one to actualize the knowledge, skills, and capacities you acquire in your education. Specifically, students will examine whether business is an activity for which people must atone. Why exactly are people suspicious of it? Are they right to be suspicious? Students will investigate how business and the market economy function, both in theory and in practice, and what the purposes are that they are supposed to serve. Students will also look at specific issues and cases that arise in a market economy, in an effort to understand what limits, if any, there should be on business and markets.

 

Reading and Writing Social Justice
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Marjory Wentworth
English
CRNs: 16408 and 16409
Course Times: TR 9:25-10:40 and M 4:00-4:50

Through reading and creative writing, students will examine what it means to be a writer in the community. Students will develop creative writing competency and craft. This is an introductory creative writing class which requires no previous experience. Course readings will examine how writers employ elements of craft to produce works that break silences. Writing exercises will explore how creative writing can serve as a tool for empowerment and social change. Students will write reflection journals, poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction which includes autobiography, testimonials and life stories. Through this process students will learn how to develop a compassionate and critical eye for creative work both inside and outside the classroom.

 

Banned Books
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Marjory Wentworth
English
CRNs: 16410 and 16411
Course Times: TR 10:50-12:05 and T 4:05-4:55

This course examines a variety of texts that have been banned across several centuries and continents. Texts have been seized or outlawed, classified as taboo, their authors fined, jailed, tortured, exiled, and killed throughout history under many different political regimes. The focus is literature from the past two centuries, spanning diverse cultural and political contexts. In America, many writers of our most beloved books have experienced the sting of censorship and distorted judgment aimed at their work. Recent examined within its unique role in our democracy. We will also incorporate contemporary First Amendment issues–especially in terms of the internet (social media), hate speech, the alarming spike in censorship of books and curriculum happening in school districts across the country.

 

From Sherlock Holmes to Selena Gomez: Detective Fiction and Its Descendants
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Elizabeth Baker
English
CRNs: 16412 and 16413
Course Times: MW 2:00-3:15 and R 11:05-11:55

In addition to tracing the history, conventions, and surprising variety of detective fiction, the course will also examine its influence outside of literature. Among the questions that will be addressed: How does detective fiction reflect time and place? How did detective fiction become the antecedent of certain pop culture trends? Why do familiar genres (the private investigator, the police procedural) remain hugely popular in both traditional and reimagined forms? Why do true crime documentaries and podcasts continue to proliferate? How have cultural shifts around race and gender been reflected in crime fiction (as well as film, TV, and other formats)? What might account for the enduring appeal of detective fiction and its offshoots?

 

The Story of Now: Writing Fiction on Our World
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Malinda McCollum
English
CRNs: 16414 and 16415
Course Times: TR 10:50-12:05 and R 2:05-2:05

In this course, you'll study creative writing that responds to current events (including climate change and the pandemic) and write your own fiction based on real-life source material. We'll examine how writers can engage with environmental, social, and political issues while crafting immersive narratives that read like stories, not statements. We will also consider the role of research in fiction, how journalism, scholarship, and science might inspire and inform our creative work. Throughout the semester, you will experiment with realistic and speculative fiction, dystopian and utopian narratives, and traditional and unconventional forms. How will the stories you write illuminate local and global problems, serve as cautionary tales, and/or offer blueprints for a better world?

 

What American Literature Can Teach Us about Race, Equity, and Inclusion (REI Course)
FYSU 114 and FYSS 101
Mike Duvall
English
CRNs: 16764 and 16417
Course Times: TR 12:15-1:30 and T 4:05-4:55

Imaginative literature—fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction—immerses us in social, psychological, and embodied realities beyond our own, helping us to see and feel life as experienced by others who may differ from us along one or more of the many intersecting dimensions that construct our social and personal identities and realities: race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and so on. Literature also helps us recognize the workings of culture and systems that give rise to inequity and inequality, and it can also be a powerful resource for imagining a more inclusive society. In this seminar, we will read, explore, and discuss American literary texts for the ways in which they help us understand race, equity, and inclusion in the US.

 

The 1967 Legacy and Beyond
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Valerie Frazier
English
CRNs: 16418 and 16419
Course Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and M 2:00-2:50

CofC’s first black graduate Eddie Ganaway once said of his experience, “It was almost like Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. I did get the sense that I was being looked through.” (College of Charleston Magazine, 2007). In this class, students will ask: “How can we increase visibility and shine a light on black student trailblazers so that the community can better acknowledge and appreciate their contributions?” The course will introduce students to the significance of the year 1967 (the year of desegregation), black student contributions at the College, and the history of black Charleston. The course also connects students with the Charleston area through lectures, workshops, and community engagement activities.

 

Harry Potter and the Human Condition
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Trish Ward
English
CRNs: 16768 and 16769
Course times: TR 4:00-5:15 and M 3:00-3:50

J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series develops themes of love, death, power, innocence, prejudice, appearance/reality, and what it means to be human.  In this seminar students will read and discuss all seven books in the series with special attention to these themes and the ways in which they are developed. Students enrolled in the course are strongly advised to begin reading the books before the course begins.

 

Interpreting our National Treasures: From Parks to Moon Rocks
FYSE 117 and FYSS 101
Cassandra Runyon
Geology
CRNs: 16420 and 16421
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and M 12:00-12:50

National Treasures: From Parks to Moon Rocks will explore some of our country’s greatest natural treasures. America’s national parks and our nearest planetary neighbor, the Moon, were formed by violent geologic processes, yet yield stunning landscapes and similar compositions. This course will compare and contrast key geologic processes that formed the Earth and Moon and the methods and tools used to explore them.

 

Food for Thought
FYSE 119 and FYSS 101
Bea Lavelle
Health and Human Performance
CRNs: 16422 and 16423
Course times: TR 4:00-5:15 and W 11:00-11:50

Does happiness begin in our gut? In this course students will explore the evidence-based science that proves thoughts and nutrition are deeply intertwined and have a direct impact on emotional wellbeing. The gut and brain are in constant bidirectional communication with each other. This physiological association is recognized as the gut-brain connection. As a result of this unique and dynamic relationship, what we eat affects our emotions and what we think impacts our gut. Together, students will explore the gut-brain axis and learn how they can harness and maximize its power to feel happier.

 

¡Conoce España: Comunidades, Costumbres, y Cocina!
SPAN 202 and FYSS 101
Devon Hanahan
Hispanic Studies
3 Foreign Language credits
CRNs: 16424 and 16425
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and T 3:05-3:55

This course will fulfill the required Spanish 202 course and cover all of the required departmental curriculum, but it will also focus on the variety of communities, cultures and cuisine of Spain. Students will learn enough Spanish history to understand how Spain’s geography has definitively shaped its history and culture more so than many other countries and will also keep up with current events in Spain. Each student will be in charge of a different region of Spain for the semester and will build up a portfolio to share with the class and the department. Students will have cooking lessons, dine out in a Spanish restaurant and see short films related to each lesson.

 

Global Perspectives: Barcelona and the Mediterranean Coast 
SPAN 202 and FYSS 101
Daniel Delgado
Hispanic Studies
3 Foreign Language credits
CRNs: 16426 and 16427
Course Times: TR 9:25-10:40 and M 11:00-11:50

While following the requirements for SPAN 202 and its departmental curriculum, this course will also focus on the Cultural Practices, Products and Perspectives of the Spanish Mediterranean Coast with an emphasis on two of its most famous cities, Barcelona and Valencia. We will explore the history, traditions, local languages, architecture, art, music, gastronomy, politics and internationally renowned people of one of the most famous regions in Spain. With the use of supplementary materials, such as readings, videos, films and music, students will gain a better understanding of the cultural richness of this unique region. Students will also learn how to cook a traditional paella during Hispanic Heritage Month.

 

Intriguing Questions. Interesting Answers. Illustrious Readings (A-B)
FYSE 121 and FYSS 101
Rich Bodek
History
(A) CRNs: 16428 and 16429
(A) Course Times: TR 1:40-2:55 and R 11:05-11:55
(B) CRNs: 16430 and 16431
(B) Course Times: TR 3:05-4:20 and W 4:00-4:50

‘Who am I?’ ‘Why am I here?’ ‘What does success mean?’ ‘What is a person?’ ‘What is the “Good Life,” and how can I live it?’  If these are the questions you’ve been thinking about as you think about your college career, then this is the course for you. Such issues are the heart of a liberal arts education. If you’re hoping to find others who want to talk about and explore them, then join us. This semester we will read short stories, essays, poems, and more that ask and try to answer these questions. This class is not lecture-based. We will have a polite and respectful but full-throttle discussion of some of the questions that help us decide who and what we are and will try to be.

 

Queer Questions: LGBTQ+ Historical Identities
FYSE 121 and FYSS 101
Sandy Slater
History
CRNs: 16669 and 16670
Course Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 (ONLINE SYNC) and W 3:00-3:50 (ONLINE SYNC)

Increased attention and activism surrounding queer communities (LGBTQ+) has stimulated vigorous conversations related to collective and individual identities within the community, as well as in relation to larger social issues.  This course, with its grounding in historical understanding of queer life and resistance, offers an opportunity to understand the contemporary debates and calls for equity and inclusion through an historical lens. Course materials include a variety of interdisciplinary materials including memoirs, literature, music, and oral histories. Focus will be on an Atlantic narrative of queerness, as much of the material focuses on American narratives, history, and debates.

 

Information Revolutions
FYSE 121 and FYSS 101
Elisa Jones
History
CRNs: 16432 and 16433
Course Times: TR 12:15-1:30 and M 2:00-2:50

In the digital age, we are all consumers and creators of information. In this course, students will learn how social media regulations and Google search algorithms fit into the radical history of reading and the often counter-intuitive experiences of censorship and misinformation. They will explore how technological innovations in reading and the expansion of information historically led to predictions of societal decline and attempts to control who could read and write what, and how methods of classifying and retrieving knowledge can either challenge or reinforce the biases of individual readers. From the invention of the book (or codex) in 100 CE to the World Wide Web, explore the unintended consequences of information revolutions through case-studies in the cultural history of reading.

 

The Professional Learner: Developing Your Personal Brand
FYSE 122 and FYSS 101
Jeremy Clement
Hospitality and Tourism Management
CRNs: 16434 and 16435
Course Times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and T 2:05-2:55

Professional Learners develop tools to become thoughtful, life-long learners of the world around them.  This course will focus on preparing students to recognize and respond to the opportunities around them; both through developing an individual brand and through proactive professional collateral development (business cards, resume, professional writing sample, professional headshot).  The goal will be to ensure students are projecting an appropriate, professional image to the business world; and to help the student better understand how to identify and achieve their professional aspirations. We will also hear from a variety of business and community leaders, learning more about their careers, how they develop others and themselves, and what leadership looks like in their organizations and employees.

 

The Holocaust on Screen
FYSE 124 and FYSS 101
Chad Gibbs
Jewish Studies
CRNs: 16436 and 16437
Course Times: M 4:00-6:45 and T 2:05-2:55

Most of what people know about the Holocaust comes from films and documentaries. From newsreels outside of Europe to the Nazi’s own propaganda films, this was as true then as it is now. The movies, visual documents, and documentaries of the Holocaust from then to now seek to tell the viewer something or provoke certain feelings. This course begins before and during the Holocaust with the films of the Nazi regime and the reporting of the outside world, continuing to the present day. We analyze these films with several unifying questions: What was the filmmaker’s message? And, speaking of more recent movies and documentaries, what themes predominate and what are the responsibilities of filmmakers and documentarians taking on this topic?

 

Israel through Film and Media
FYSE 124 and FYSS 101
Keren Ayalon
Jewish Studies
CRNs: 16438 and 16439
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and W 12:00-12:50

The course will introduce students to Israeli politics and culture via class discussions and assigned readings, as well as primary sources in the form of film, music, television segments, and short stories. Students will engage such materials throughout the semester via class discussions and short written assignments. Topics will include the political system, the economy, religion and state, immigration, and education.

 

Divas, Drag Queens, and Deities Across the Americas (REI Course)
FYSG 125 and FYSS 101
David Dulceany
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
CRNs: 16762 and 16441
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and W 11:00-11:50

What does it mean to be a diva? Are we all in drag? This course explores the intersection of race, class, gender, and national identity in the Americas, with a particular focus on the Caribbean, South America, and the US South. In regard to this intersection, students will question how the gendered concepts of the diva or the drag queen relate to political engagement through the forum of popular culture and media. They will also explore gendered aspects of Afro-Caribbean religions and deities. Students will study the lives, cultural impact, and performances of artists such as Celia Cruz, Beyoncé, Rihanna, Nicki Minaj, Cardi B, RuPaul, Grace Jones, Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, Carmen Miranda, the Mirabal sisters, Nancy Morejón, Katherine Dunham and many more.

 

Business and Popular Culture: America vs. Brazil
FYSE 125 and FYSS 101
Daniela Meireles
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
CRNs: 16442 and 16443
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and T 11:05-11:55

This course intersects Business and Brazilian Studies. Brazil and the U.S. are important trading partners and both countries hold crucial positions in international operations globally. Students will navigate complex intercultural negotiations between Americans and Brazilians. This course will prepare students for personal and business-related and cultural interactions with Brazilians in the U.S. and abroad. Students will explore cultural case studies, photography, documentaries, music, literature, and digital media produced by both Americans and by Brazilians.

 

Healing Journeys
FYSE 125 and FYSS 101
Sarah Owens
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
CRNs: 16445 and 16446
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and T 2:05-2:55

Journeys or the act of traveling from one place to the other can take on different meanings for different people. This class will focus on the act of travel as a healing process for the participant, whether it be physical, spiritual, or emotional. From the 1600s until present day students will be exposed to travel through the lens of historical texts, novels, films, and travel blogs. Students will analyze voyages of Spanish nuns on the fleets of Indies, pilgrims on the Camino de Santiago in Spain, motorcycle road trips across South America, and medical tourism in Costa Rica. Throughout the semester students will gain a better understanding of the power of travel in the Hispanic World and beyond. This course is schedule as a hybrid with both in-person and online meetings.

 

iHuman
FYSE 130 and FYSS 101
Sorinel Oprisan
Physics
CRNs: 16447 and 16448
Course times: MWF 3:00-3:50 and R 3:05-3:55

This course turns a critical eye on human-machine interaction. Through various media (interviews with IT experts, movies, SF stories, and peer-reviewed studies on brain- computer interfaces), students will explore the widespread view that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is destined to destroy human civilization. Ultimately we will consider the ethical issues at the core of AI and what they reveal about humans and our relationship with machines.

 

Hurricanes and their Impact on Society
FYSE 130 and FYSS 101
Gabriel Williams
Physics
CRNs: 16449 and 16450
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and R 3:00-3:50

The hurricane is one of nature’s most intense phenomena and one of the coastal resident’s greatest fears. The goal of this course is to provide a portrait of the interrelated scientific and societal aspects of hurricanes. Students will see that the study of hurricanes is not merely a complex scientific question, but it is a multidisciplinary question that involves socioeconomic, demographic, and resource factors that work in concert to inform public policy. Students will be given a big picture overview of the holistic perspective needed to study hurricanes and the hazards they produce.

 

Solvable: Scientific Solutions for the Past, Present, and Future
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Stephen Short
Psychology
CRNs: 16451 and 16452
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and T 3:05-3:55

A quick glance at current affairs can quickly seem bleak with climate change, pandemics, increased prevalence of mental illness, decreased physical health, and denial of science. But, as the renowned scientist Carl Sagan notes, science can serve as a candle in the dark and inspire hope. Past, present and future scientific discoveries can provide us with solvable solutions to many of today’s problems. In this course students will explore the history of science as a way of understanding the world, review past examples of pivotal scientific discoveries, and apply scientific thinking to many of today’s current issues including improving mental and physical health, addressing climate change, and decreasing science denial.

 

Psychology of Travel
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Chelsea Reid-Short
Psychology
CRNs: 16453 and 16454
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and W 9:00-9:50

In this course, students will seek to understand how travel impacts individuals, close relationships, broader social groups, and the larger world by reviewing and applying psychological scientific research and theory. This course will examine how travel affects our mental and physical health, relationship quality, and work productivity, and we will discuss challenges that individuals of different demographic groups may face when traveling. Students will also examine how our travel may impact people who live and work at the locations to which we travel, and how our travel can impact our attitudes and behaviors toward other cultures and social groups. Finally, students will examine how travel may impact our natural environment and surrounding world, including a focus on sustainability and eco-tourism.

 

Emerging Adulthood: The Age of Possibilities
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Amy Kolak
Psychology
CRNs: 16455 and 16456
Course Times: TR 10:50-12:05 and W 10:00-10:50

In this course, we will review research, theory, and practice related to Emerging Adulthood (a relatively new term that is being applied to individuals between 19 and 29 in primarily industrialized countries). The variety of factors, including social, economic, and psychological, that are related to the emergence of this new developmental period, along with its impact on society, will be discussed. Research on the various domains (i.e. school, work, love, family, and identity) of emerging adults’ lives will be examined. Finally, we will explore individual behaviors and contexts that may be associated with the successful navigation of this period.

  

Living in Community: The Psychology of Oppression, Resistance, & Regeneration (REI Course)
FYSU 132 and FYSS 101
Jennifer Wright
Psychology
CRNS: 16767 and 16520
Course Times: MW 3:25-4:40 and M 9:00-9:50

This course explores human community through a psychological lens. What does it take for communities to sustainably thrive? Evidence suggests that this is best accomplished by adopting inclusive, egalitarian, democratic systems, and regenerative practices in harmony with surrounding ecosystems. Yet often we are instead trapped within restrictive, oppressive, authoritarian systems whose extractive practices, time and again, use force to colonize, dominate, and destroy lands, bodies, lifeways, and minds. This course investigates the psychological precursors and consequences of these two paths of human community, paying special attention to US examples, and grapples with the question – if the former is necessary for humans to thrive, why is the latter so common? And how/when can communities best resist, creating and demanding transformative alternatives?

 

How to Survive an Apocalypse (REI Course)
FYSU 134 and FYSS 101
Matthew Cressler
Religious Studies
CRNs: 16765 and 16458
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and R 3:05-3:55

Americans are obsessed with imagining the end of the world. Post-apocalyptic fiction tops the pop culture charts today. Why? Where do our doomsday stories come from? What do they teach us about ourselves? And can they teach us how to live better lives? This course will ask big questions as we dive deep into movies, shows, comics, and novels, including The Walking Dead and Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower. Students will unpack the religious roots of “apocalypse” as an idea. They will study the history of real-life apocalypses, such as the genocides ushered in by European colonialism around the world. Ultimately, this course asks what the end of the world might look like and invites us to consider the religious, cultural, and political resources necessary for survival.

 

American Popular Culture (A-B)
FYSE 135 and FYSS 101
Paul Roof
Sociology
(A) CRNs: 16459 and 16460
(A) Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and T 2:05-2:55
(B) CRNs: 16461 and 16462
(B) Course times: MW 3:25-4:40 and T 1:05-1:55

This course is designed to introduce students to critical analysis of contemporary popular culture in the United States.  Students will get an overview of the insights, findings, concepts, and perspectives that are held by a wide variety of interdisciplinary popular culture scholars today.  Several prominent areas of popular culture to be studied include advertising, television, film, music, religion, and cyberculture.

 

Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: More Than Just a Movie
FYSE 136 and FYSS 101
Kent Gourdin
Supply Chain and Information Management
CRNs: 16463 and 16464
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and M 10:00-10:50

Most consumers have little concern for how the products they purchase reach stores. Despite the fact that these come from all over the world, most of us only notice those instances when what we want is not available. We know we live in a port city, perhaps notice a big ship when it is in the harbor, or curse all of the trucks moving containers on our roadways, but we never give a thought to what they represent. This course will introduce students to the fascinating areas of global transportation, logistics, and supply chain management which work together to get us the products we want, when we want them, at a price we are willing to pay.

 

Teaching Fellows
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Ian O'Byrne
Teacher Education
CRNs: 16465 and 16468
Course times: R 1:00-3:45 and F 10:00-10:50

This course is specifically designed for freshmen Teaching Fellows and Call Me Mister students. These students have chosen education as their major and profession in return from the State of South Carolina. This course is the first in a series of learning experiences for students who will teach in South Carolina schools after graduation. Content of this course will focus on issues in education including but not limited to, best practices, integrated learning, and Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT).  This course is designed to help students adjust to college life and excel as future educators. This course is open only to pre-selected Teaching Fellows and Call Me Misters.

 

Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Susan Flynn
Teacher Education
CRNs: 16466 and 16467
Course times: W 3:00-6:00 and T 4:05-4:55

Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics course is designed to provide students interested in pursuing a degree in occupational and physical therapy as well as teacher education, with the knowledge and skills to design and implement movement experiences to enhance children's physical, social and emotional development. Students may be able to participate in the FitCatZ Aquatic and Motor Program putting theory to practice teaching young children with disabilities in a therapy setting or participate in a virtual therapy guest speaker series.

 

Voices of Diversity: Playwrights and Characters
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Evan Parry
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 16469 and 16470
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and W 2:00-2:50

This course will examine dramatic literature from Greek tragedy to the present day, focusing on playwrights and characters whose race, gender, sexuality or accessibility sets them apart from the world of the play or the world in which it was written. In addition, the course will include performance projects of scenes and portions of plays, to be directed, acted, designed and dramaturged entirely by members of the class. Some of these projects will be performed for the public.

 

Dancing on Stage and Screen: Investigating the Perspective of the Audience
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Kristin Alexander
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 16471 and 16472
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and M 4:00-4:50

The Golden Age of Cinema and Television changed the accessibility of viewing dance, and now more than ever, dance is right at our fingertips.  How does this type of accessibility affect the audience perspective?  Does it help or hinder the desire to attend live dance performances?  Dancing on Stage and Screen will look at performances of all genres of dance in both live and recorded forms, prompting an investigation of the audience perspective. Historical perspective, contemporary trends, artist intent and personal aesthetic will all be discussed.  Additionally, the course will cover dance  films and choreography intended for the camera.

 

Race, Culture, and Identity on Broadway (REI Course)
FYSU 139 and FYSS 101
Nakeisha Daniel
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 16766 and 16476
Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and R 2:05-2:55

This course is a study of race and representation in Broadway musical theatre and how performances of race and ethnicity by African Americans structure the American musical’s aesthetic and political work. In this course, students will engage in the study of notable musicals written by African American composers and playwrights including Noble Sissy, George C. Wolfe, Michael R. Jackson and Kirsten Childs. Students will also learn about each of these seminal composers and their stylistic contributions to American musical theater. As each musical is analyzed, students will explore how they relate to US culture, history, and politics while also considering how race, gender, sexuality and class are reflected in these works.

 

Travel for Transformation: Journeys of (Self) Discovery
FYSE 141 and FYSS 101
Alison Smith
Women’s and Gender Studies
CRNs: 16649 and 16650
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and F 12:00-12:50

Have you ever dreamed of undertaking an extraordinary adventure?  Are you eager to hike the Pacific Crest Trail, walk the Camino de Santiago, or climb Mount Kilimanjaro?  In this course, we will explore the transformative potential offered by travel, which might be a globe-trotting adventure or simply discovering a new place in your local area.  Transformative travel involves learning, personal growth, exploring identity, and reflecting on the journey.  It encompasses an array of experiences, such as physical challenges, immersive cultural encounters, journeys of a religious or spiritual nature, or any combination of these and other informative experiences.  The essential components of transformative travel are preparation for the journey, the trip itself, and reflection and action upon return.

 

Connecting with Nature in the Modern World (A-B)
FYSE 142 and FYSS 101
Nick Principe
Environmental Studies
(A) CRNs: 16477 and 16478
(A) Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and M 1:00-1:50
(B) CRNs: 16479 and 16480
(B) Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and F 10:00-10:50

We know that spending quality time in nature can quickly wash away the worries of the day and if done regularly, can improve our well-being. The question is, if nature is so beneficial for us, then why are we a nation of people who seem to be more uncoupled from nature than ever before? In this course, students will examine ways in which we can connect with the natural world around us, both individually and as a society. The class will explore research on the effects of nature on mental well-being, the state of modern food production, and how reconnecting with nature might just give us a fighting chance against biodiversity loss and the effects of climate change.

 

Visualizing your World: Data and Storytelling
FYSE 143 and FYSS 101
Jannette Finch
College of Charleston Libraries
CRNs: 16481 and 16482
Course times: TR 3:05-4:20 and W 9:00-9:50

What is fascinating to you? All data tells a story, and as world citizens, you will benefit from using data to tell your own story and to explore the world around you. In this course, students will learn how to verify data sources and to recognize misleading graphics. Students employ effective visualizations to explore trends, develop insight, and illuminate patterns. We will mine a brief history of visualization, appreciate visualization classics, and explore visualization best practices. We will critically evaluate and interpret existing visualizations and produce our own visualizations. Data visualization is an essential literacy for the 21st century student.  Learning how to present your insights clearly through data visualization is a skill that you will use throughout your life.