Fall 2021

Students at Barsa Students choose to complete either a Learning Community or a First Year Seminar to complete the FYE graduation requirement.

Learning Communities (LC) link two academic courses (6-8 credit hours). Faculty teaching these courses work together to establish joint activities and common curriculum themes designed to explore the ways in which subjects are interrelated. All Learning Communities fulfill the FYE graduation requirement in addition to counting towards other general education requirements (listed with each LC).

A First Year Seminar (FYSE) is an academic course (3 credit hours) that explores special topics taught by outstanding faculty.

All FYE courses have an attached Synthesis Seminar (FYSS). Upperclassmen serve as peer facilitators and lead weekly 50-minute synthesis seminars that introduce students to the College’s academic community. The synthesis seminar component offers the advantage of getting the perspective of and advice from a successful College of Charleston student.

Students must be enrolled in all parts of their Learning Community (including all science labs) or First-Year Seminar to receive credit.

Information about online courses, when applicable: 

Online courses are indicated as such and are listed as either Synchronous (SYNC) or Asynchronous (ASYNC).

  •   Synchronous online course class meetings are facilitated during the times they are listed, and students and faculty may interface in realtime via Zoom or other videosharing software methods.
  •   Asynchronous online courses will not meet during a regularly scheduled time for class meetings.

Most courses will be in-person unless labeled as online.


Critical Conversations

Black Lives
Race, Gender, and the Body
The 1967 Legacy and Beyond
Deconstructing the Nation: Politics, Identity and Race in Modern Times
Race and Ethnicity in American Comedic Fiction

Countries and Cultures, Past and Present
Mangia! Eating and Speaking Like an Italian
French Culture and the City of Charleston
Experiencing Ancient Rome
Food, Travel, and Faith in Asia
Film and Media in Israel
Global Perspectives: Madrid and Andalusia
Global Perspectives: Barcelona and the Mediterranean Coast
Not Just World Cup Soccer: Business and Culture in Brazil

Experiencing Charleston and the Lowcountry
Architectural History and Historic Preservation in the Holy City
Sending the ‘Write’ Message: Managing Tourism in Charleston
Charleston Writers

Engaging with Society through Contemporary Issues and Relationships
The Human Side of Sustainability
Planes, Plagues, and Politics: What's Globalization Got to Do with Public Health
Small for Big: Small Patterns to Solve the Big Problems YOU Care About
Economics of Globalization
Breaking Silence: The Writer in the Community
The Border
Climate Fiction and the Possibility of Justice
The Problems and Perils of Agriculture: Growing Regenerative Solutions in the 21st Century
Epic Trauma: The Psychological Impact of War
Psychology of Travel
Beat the Carbon Clock!
American Popular Culture
The History of Stuff

Exploration of Self, Identity, and Development
Everyday Rhetoric: Understanding Who You Are as a Writer and Communicator
Dancing Away Your Fear of Public Speaking
Understanding the “I” in Identity
Is it All in Your Head?: Wellness of Body and Mind
The Life of the Senses
Get Me Bodied: Integrating Mind and Body in the Writing Process
Financial Literacy for Generation Z
Courage and How to See It
Teaching Fellows
Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics
The Power of Play for Young Children’s Learning and Development

Exploration of Technology, Science, and Nature
Engineering: Perspectives and Communication
From Russia with Code: Cybersecurity and Russian
Biology and Chemistry for Medicine and Biomedical Research
An Earth Without Us! (LC11)
Charleston Earthquakes, Hurricanes, Floods, and Artillery!
Gateway to Neuroscience (LC15 A-B)
STEM-SCAMP (LC21)
Sprechen Sie Business Tech? German Technology in South Carolina and Beyond
Pandemics in Human History, Present and Future
Interpreting our National Treasures: From Parks to Moon Rocks
Swimming in Plastic Soup  
The Physics of Minecraft
Hurricanes and their Impact on Society
Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: More Than Just a Movie
Connecting with Nature in the Modern World
AR U Experienced?: Introduction to Augmented and Virtual Reality

Engaging Our World through the Arts, Literature, and Religion
Visual Culture: Page and Screen
Play/Write: What Narrative, Performance, and the Arts of Persuasion Have in Common
New Ways of Seeing: Producing Art in Contemporary Culture
Comics and American Culture
Banned Books
Writers Change the World
Ecology and the Literary Imagination
Who Do Voodoo? We all Do! Exploring Magic and Ritual in Religions Familiar and Strange
Reading Hamilton: Hip-Hop and History in the American Musical
Voices of Diversity: Playwrights and Characters
Behind the Curtain: Exploring the World of Live Theatre
Dancing on Stage and Screen: Investigating the Perspective of the Audience
Beyond Narcos and Latin Lovers: Studies in Film
Reading the Female Gothic

 

Learning Communities:

Black Lives (LC1) (Critical Conversations Learning Community)
AAST 200: Intro to African American Studies and AFST 101 Intro to African Studies and FYSS 101
Don Polite and Christopher Day
African American Studies and Political Science
6 Humanities credits
CRNs: 12910 and 13360 and13361
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and TR 9:25-10:40 and F 3:00-3:50

This FYE will investigate and explain the concept of “Black Lives” from the combined perspective of African American Studies and African Studies. The effort to explore this important intersection will build upon a key component of our collective identity at the College of Charleston, which is the unique and essential vantage point from which to study the historical, cultural, and material connections between Africa, the particular experience of the Carolina Lowcountry, and the African American experience more generally.

 

Architectural History and Historic Preservation in the Holy City (LC2)
ARTH 105: Intro to Architecture and HPCP 199: Intro to Historic Preservation and FYSS 101
Brigit Ferguson and Ashton Finley
Art History and Historic Preservation
6 Humanities credits
CRNS: 12013 and 12014 and 13362
Course Times: MWF 9:30-10:20 and MWF 10:30-11:20 and T 4:05-4:55 (ONLINE SYNC)

Using Charleston as a living laboratory, this LC will introduce students to architectural
history and historic preservation. Introduction to Architectural History explores Western architecture from ancient Mesopotamia to the 21st century in terms of function, structure, form, and historical context. The historic preservation portion introduces students to the economic, environmental and cultural benefits of preservation of our built environment while also addressing issues in heritage management using Charleston examples and studying local buildings in situ. Students will write stylistic analyses, learn basic architectural terminology and research architectural and historic significance using primary sources. The LC will include site visits to buildings across Charleston.

  

The Human Side of Sustainability (LC3)
ANTH 115: Intro to Cultural Sustainability and SOCY 102: Contemporary Social Issues and FYSS 101
Christine Finnan and Julia McReynolds-Pérez
Anthropology and Sociology
3 elective credits and 3 Social Science credits
CRNS: 13363 and 13364 and 13365
Course Times:  TR 10:50-12:05 and TR 9:25-10:40 and M 5:00-5:50

This Learning Community focuses on the human side of sustainability. We examine social and cultural factors that play a part in efforts to create a just, equitable, and healthy world. ANTH 115: Introduction to Cultural Sustainability provides an introduction to cultural anthropology and sustainability literacy, and it places cultural sustainability within economic, environmental, and social issues. SOCY 102: Contemporary Social Issues provides an introduction to sociology and examines social and organizational issues related to sustainability, with a special focus on inequality and strategies for change. Students have the opportunity to become involved in the Sustainability Literacy Institute and potentially identify opportunities for future internships or research projects. Successful completion of these courses will fulfill one required and one elective course for the Cultural Sustainability Certificate.

 

Visual Culture: Page and Screen (LC4)
ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and ENGL 212: Cinema: History and Criticism and FYSS 101
Tim Carens and Colleen Glenn
English and Film Studies
4 English and 3 Humanities credits
CRNS: 13366* and 13447* and 13367*
Course Times:  TR 10:50-12:05 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and MW 2:00-3:15 and R 6:05-6:55

*Contact your advisor or FYE to get an override into this class

This Learning Community will help students to better understand central forms of visual culture including advertisements, messaging campaigns, television programs, and cinema. It will emphasize the ways that such media convey ideas, construct attitudes, and entertain minds. In ENGL 110, students will learn how to develop arguments about different forms of visual media by focusing on the explanation of the ways that language and images create meaning. In ENGL 212, students will study movies from a wide range of genres, directors, and time periods and learn the basic elements of film, including editing, cinematography, sound, mise-en-scène, and narrative.

 

Play/Write: What Narrative, Performance, and the Arts of Persuasion Have in Common (LC5)
ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and THTR 176: Intro to Theatre and FYSS 101
Devin Byker and Nakeisha Daniel
English and Theatre and Dance
4 English and 3 Humanities credits
CRNS: 13368 and 13370 and 13369
Course Times:  MW 5:30-6:45 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and MW 11:00-11:50 and M 4:00-4:50

How does theatre entrance an audience? How can you write, perform, and persuade in ways that capture attention and move hearts and minds? In this Learning Community, students will analyze how theatre, narrative, and rhetoric use similar strategies to communicate effectively with distinct audiences and under particular constraints. In THTR 176, students will explore how to respond critically to live performance and written scripts, how to develop the capacity to empathize through exposure to diverse theatrical histories, and how to articulate the connection of their own experiences when joined with an audience at the theatre. In ENGL 110, students will explore how they acquired specific forms of literacy, how to understand the rhetorical situation of drama, performance, and writing; and how to remediate their creative and analytical projects in order to successfully reach new audiences.

 

Engineering: Perspectives and Communication (LC6)
ENGR 103: Fundamentals of Electrical and Systems Engineering and ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Oladimeji Olufunke and Caroline Hunt
Engineering and English
3 elective credits and 4 English credits
CRNS: 12260 and 13371 and 13372
Course Times: TR 8:00-9:15 and MWF 10:00-10:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and M 6:00-6:50

In this course, students will be able to learn engineering fundamentals, international perspectives on engineering, and some of the multicultural understanding and teamwork skills necessary for professional collaboration. Students are also expected to develop an appreciation towards diversity. Students will also learn about the important role communication plays in enabling the success of engineering projects and in modern technology-driven life including politics, the economy, culture, and the environment

 

Mangia! Eating and Speaking Like an Italian (LC7)
HEAL 257: Principles of Nutrition and ITAL 101: Elementary Italian and FYSS 101
Michelle Futrell and Katherine Greenburg
Health and Human Performance and Italian Studies
3 elective credits and 3 foreign language credits
CRNS: 12020 and 10196 and 13373
Course Times: ONLINE ASYNC and MWF 10:00-10:50 and M 4:00-4:50

Food brings people together and this learning community will use the study of food to connect the traditional introductory Italian classroom with the online Principles of Nutrition classroom. The overarching focus of this learning community will be the Mediterranean Diet, recognized as the best overall diet for the third year in a row by US News & World Report. The learning community combines the science behind current dietary guidelines with an examination of the cultural importance of food in the lives of everyday Italians. The Learning Community will provide students with an opportunity to understand their own personal dietary habits in comparison with those of the greater Italian population. Students will also complete one semester of their language requirement.

  

From Russia with Code: Cybersecurity and Russian (LC8)
RUSS 101: Elementary Russian I and CSCI 111: Intro to Cybersecurity and FYSS 101
Meglena Miltcheva and Lancie Affonso
Russian and Computer Science
3 foreign language and 3 elective credits
CRNS: 10126 and 11408 and 13374
Course Times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and MWF 10:00-10:50 and M 3:00-3:50 (ONLINE SYNC)

In recent years, Russian cybercrime has become the most dangerous threat to the US computer security systems. Government and businesses are scrambling to find Cybersecurity experts who specialize in Russian. This learning community helps you to acquire this much-needed expertise in the connections between Russia and Cybersecurity. RUSS 101 introduces the Cyrillic alphabet and Russian language, with a focus on computer vocabulary. CSCI 111 focuses on the domains of cybersecurity with specific examples applied to the Russian attacks. We will cover the following domain areas and touch on specific Russian attacks that penetrated the area in question: Access control and identity management, cryptography, policies, procedures, and awareness, physical security, perimeter defenses, network defenses, host defenses, application defenses, and data defenses.

  

Biology and Chemistry for Medicine and Biomedical Research (LC9)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L*:  Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and CHEM 111**: Principles of Chemistry and CHEM 111L: Principles of Chemistry Lab and FYSS 101
Kathleen Janech and Amy Rogers
Biology and Chemistry
8 natural science credits**
CRNS: 10976 and 10092 and 11552 and 10148 and 13375
Course Times: TR 1:40-2:55 and W 4:35-7:35 and MWF 9:00-9:50am and F 12:05-3:05 and T 8:05-8:55am

This learning community is tailored to incoming first-year students with a strong desire to pursue a career in medicine or in biomedical research. The fields of Chemistry and Biology are increasingly intertwined and faculty will use these two introductory courses to demonstrate the natural connections between the fields.
* Math 111 is a prerequisite or co-requisite for CHEM 111
**4 credits towards natural science general education requirements and 4 credits towards science major. 

 

French Culture and the City of Charleston (LC10)
FRCS 101: French Cultural Studies and FREN 101: Beginning French Through Culture 1 and FYSS 101
Katharine Hargrave and Margaret Keneman
French and French
3 Humanities and 3 foreign language credits
CRNS: 13005 and 10180 and 13378
Course Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and MWF 11:00-11:50 and R 4:05-4:55

You know that Charleston is a historic city rich in European culture, but how much of it is influenced by France? Join this experiential learning community to find out! Because the beautiful city of Charleston is at our doorstep, we not only learn about but also VISIT sites such as the French Quarter, the Huguenot Church, French family archives at the Charleston Library Society, a Chartres inspired labyrinth, Le Creuset Atelier, and of course the sights, sounds, smells and TASTES of some delicious French restaurants. You will also take FREN 101 which will add an enhanced linguistic component to the experience while you learn about French cultural practices related to history, religion, healthcare, business, art, literature, education, family life, cuisine and more!

 

An Earth Without Us! (LC11)
GEOL 103: Environmental Geology and GEOL 103L: Environmental Geology Lab and ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Timothy Callahan and Joe Kelly
Geology and English
4 natural science and 4 English credits
CRNs: 10206 and 11103 and 13381 and 13382
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and M 2:30-5:30 and TR 10:50-12:05 (ONLINE SYNC and Online Class Meetings for 4th hour) and M 6:00-6:50

In this Learning Community, students will explore how human-Earth interactions have ushered in the Anthropocene era, the recent period where humans have had a dominant influence on Earth’s environment. Experiential learning activities (directed research assignments and a field trip) will allow students to apply Earth science principles to evaluate our unsustainable use of Earth’s resources and predict the future of our planet.  The famous poem, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" asks, “Do I dare to eat a peach?”  Maybe.  But what about a glass of almond milk?  Students will write about humanity’s sustaining (or failing to sustain) the legacy we share with future generations: the Earth.  They will practice the art of persuasion: how to evaluate and how to write effective arguments about our interaction with the natural world.  From their own personal perspectives, from the perspective of Earth science, and from their research, students will ask and answer the big question: how should we live our lives?

 

Charleston Earthquakes, Hurricanes, Floods, and Artillery! (LC12)
GEOL 103: Environmental Geology and GEOL 103L: Environmental Geology Lab and DATA 210: Dataset Organization and Management and FYSS 101
Steven Jaume and Lancie Affonso
Geology and Computer Science
4 natural science and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 10204 and 10804 and 11656 and 13385
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 (ONLINE SYNC) and T 1:45-4:45 and MWF 9:00-9:50 and T 5:05-5:55

Earthquakes, Hurricanes, Floods, Fires! Natural disasters have defined Charleston’s 350-year history and will likely frame its future. The linked courses (GEOL 103 and DATA 210) will introduce students to publicly available environmental data (e.g., streamflow, tide gauge, meteorological, earthquake, etc.) and several means of analyzing and interpreting these natural phenomena. Students who complete this course will be able to support transparent environmental decision-making and digital storytelling that promotes open data and analysis along with rich interactive visualizations that enable users a high level view of complex problems as well as deep dive into the data. There are no prerequisites for courses in this learning community.

 

Experiencing Ancient Rome (LC13)
LATN 101: Intro to Latin and CLAS 102: Roman Civilization and FYSS 101
Blanche McCune and Allison Sterrett-Krause
Classics
3 foreign language and 3 Humanities credits
CRNs: 10233 and 11909 and 13386
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and MWF 11:00-11:50 and F 3:00-3:50

Come learn about the Romans through their language, literature, archaeology, and art.  Students will learn to read simple passages about Roman history and culture and understand how the Romans’ language communicates ideas. Students will study the basics of Roman history, religion, architecture, art, entertainment, and social  customs. Readings in both classes will highlight connections between language and  culture, and you’ll truly get to experience ancient Rome from multiple angles. 

 

Everyday Rhetoric: Understanding Who You Are as a Writer and Communicator (LC14 A)
ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and COMM 215: Communication, Identity and Community and FYSS 101
Rosanna Durst and Merissa Ferrara
English and Communication
4 English and 3 social science credits
CRNs: 13859 and 13486 and 13388
Course Times: TR 12:15-1:30 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and TR 8:00-9:25 and M 5:00-5:50

In this learning community students will learn concepts from the related disciplines of communication and writing studies to, in the words of the inscription above Porter's Lodge, "know thyself", particularly when it comes to who you are as a writer and communicator. Both courses will ask students to consider, from different disciplinary perspectives, how the environment (including culture, gender, family, discourse, and technology)—influences verbal and nonverbal communication and relationships. Students will explore how communication choices impact how others see us and strive throughout the semester to become more competent communicators and writers, both in the classroom and beyond.

  

Gateway to Neuroscience (LC15 A-B)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and PSYC 103: Intro to Psychological Science and FYSS 101
Chris Korey and Mike Ruscio
Biology and Psychology
4 natural science and 3 social science credits
(A) CRNs: 12177 and 10082 and 13391 and 13392
(A) Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and T 1:35-4:35 and MWF 1:00-1:50 (ONLINE SYNC) and R 5:05-5:55
(B) CRNs: 13393 and 10085 and 13394 and 13395
(B) Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and M 4:35-7:35 and MWF 1:00-1:50 (ONLINE SYNC) and W 5:00-5:50

This learning community is aimed at entering first-year students with an interest in Neuroscience, particularly the interface of Psychology and Biology. These courses will demonstrate and reinforce the inherent, extensive connections between the two disciplines. PSYC 103 will introduce students to the science of behavior with special emphasis on the biological bases of behavior (neuroscience) and psychological disorders. BIOL 111 focuses on molecular and cellular biology, with a focus on basic nervous system function and the underlying biological mechanisms associated with neurological disorders. 

 

Planes, Plagues, and Politics: What's Globalization Got to Do with Public Health? (LC16)
HEAL 215: Intro to Public Health and INTL 100: Intro to International Studies and FYSS 101
Sarah Maness and Kristen McLean
Health and Human Performance and International Studies
3 elective credits and 3 Humanities credits
CRNs: 10775 and 13396 and 13397
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and TR 10:50-12:05 and W 3:00-3:50 (ONLINE SYNC)

The goal of this learning community is to further students’ understanding of globalization and its relationship to public health. This is especially important as the world becomes increasingly interconnected, and as the challenges associated with the prevention and containment of public health problems continue to grow, as evidenced by the current Covid-19 pandemic.  Students will learn the basic tenets and applications of public health, including the history of public health, an overview of core disciplines, and current events and issues, within the context of a global perspective. Students will learn about global political, economic, and cultural connections by examining topics such as migration, environmentalism, human rights, economic inequality, and global health. 

 

Sending the ‘Write’ Message: Managing Tourism in Charleston (LC17 A-B-C-D)
HTMT 210: Principles and Practices in Hospitality and Tourism Management and ENGL 110: Introduction to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Bob Frash and Ariel Hartwig
Hospitality and Tourism Management and English
3 elective credits and 4 English credits
(A) CRNs: 13398 and 13399 and 13400
(A) Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and MWF 9:00-9:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and M 8:00-8:50
(B) CRNs: 13407 and 13408 and 13409
(B) Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and MWF 10:00-10:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and W 5:00-5:50
(C) CRNs: 13410 and 13414 and 13415
(C) Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and MWF 12:00-12:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and W 6:00-6:50
(D) CRNs: 13416 and 13417 and 13418
(D) Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and MWF 12:00-12:50 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and W 6:00-6:50

The purpose of this learning community is to explore how to conduct business in the hospitality industry. Special attention will be paid on how to communicate ideas and strategies effectively throughout both the industry and the community. This class will introduce students to the hospitality environment and guide them in developing professional skills through writing business correspondences such as memos, reports, résumés and cover letters as well as creative and analytical features focusing on industry issues. Students will explore Charleston and all its offerings to understand how the tourism industry works in one of the world’s premier destinations.

 

Dancing Away Your Fear of Public Speaking (LC18)
COMM 104 and PEAC 122 and FYSS 101
Deborah McGee and Jeff Woraratanadharm
Communication and Health and Human Performance
5 elective credits
CRNs: 11057 and 13228 and 13419
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and TR 5:45-7:00 and T 4:05-4:55

Dancing Away Your Fear of Public Speaking is a learning community designed to improve students' ability to communicate, especially in situations in which they are in the spotlight. Both public speaking and social dance are communication skills that will benefit one’s personal and professional lives. Students will learn how to manage stage-fright through dancing and speaking. Students will also learn to adapt to audiences and better evaluate the messaging of others as they learn how to express themselves through voice and body.

 

Understanding the “I” in Identity (LC19)
PSYC 103: Intro to Psychological Science and ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Jenn Wilhelm and Anna Lonon
Psychology and English
3 social science and 4 English credits
CRNs: 13420 and 13421 and 13422
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 (ONLINE SYNC) and MWF 12:00-12:50; F 10:00-10:50 (4th Hour) and W 3:00-3:50

How do we define ourselves? Do we define ourselves by our actions? By how others perceive us? By how we perceive ourselves? Through this Learning Community students will explore what psychology and literature can teach us about our identity. Students will look at how others’ perceptions of us can be different from our own understanding of self, and how language reflects and informs identity. Students will examine what role society, community, and our family has on naming our identity and the identity of others. Together we will uncover more of who we are and who we want to become.

 

Is it All in Your Head?: Wellness of Body and Mind (LC20)
ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSE 132: Healthy Minds and Healthy Bodies and FYSS 101
Mike Duvall and Lisa Ross
English and Psychology
4 English and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 13423 and 13424 and 13425
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 (Online Class Meetings for 4th Hour) and TR 8:00-9:15 and W 3:00-3:50

What are the relations between body and mind, physiology and psychology? Equipped with the knowledge of this complex interchange and feedback loop, we will ask what we can do to secure physical and mental wellness in ourselves and in our communities. In this learning community, we will examine how stress, wellness, and coping are influenced by physical activity and health-impacting choices, with particular attention to the relatively common symptoms of anxiety and depression. Through the study of rhetoric and writing, you will explore your own physical and/or mental health literacies and learn how to decode popular and academic discourse about physical and mental well-being as you develop crucial writing knowledge and skills. You will also engage in wellness-focused community service and will reflect on these experiences. When you complete this Learning Community experience, you will be prepared with knowledge and skills in both writing and coping that will serve you well at the College and beyond.

 

STEM-SCAMP (LC21)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and MATH 120: Introductory Calculus and MATH 120L: Introductory Calculus Lab and FYSS 101
Chris Korey and Sofia Agrest
Biology and Mathematics
4 natural science and 4 math credits
CRNs: 13426 and 10091 and 13427 and 13428 and 13429
Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and T 4:35-7:25 and MWF 10:00-10:50; T 9:25-10:40 (ONL SYNC) and MWF 1:00-1:50 and W 4:00-4:50

The STEM-SCAMP learning community connects Biology 111 (Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology) for Science Majors and Math 120  (Calculus).  BIOL 111 focuses on molecular and cellular biology, with a focus on basic nervous system function, the underlying biological mechanisms of pain sensation, and neurological disorders associated with alterations in sensory systems. The Calculus course will provide connections between the two disciplines and how math informs our understanding of the nervous system.  This course is open only to pre-selected students.

 

Food, Travel, and Faith in Asia (LC22)
ARST 100: Introduction to Arab and Islamic World Studies and ASST 240: Special Topics in Asian Studies and FYSS 101
Garrett Davidson and Piotr Gibas
Asian Studies
3 Humanities credits and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 13465 and 13466 and 13431
Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and MW 3:25-4:40 and R 3:05-3:55

This Learning Community will use the lenses of travel, food and faith to explore various themes and topics in the study of Asia and its diverse histories, cultures, religions, and food traditions. ASST 240 will revolve around the accounts of medieval and modern travelers who explored Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Persia, India and China. The account of arguably the greatest of all medieval travelers, the fourteenth-century Moroccan Ibn Battuta, who traveled for thirty years from Tangier to Canton and back, will be one of the primary themes of the course. Through this and other travel accounts, we will explore the cultures, environments, geographies, and foodways of the lands these travelers traversed. An important component of this course will be participation in cooking demonstrations in which the class will explore various cooking techniques and ingredients indigenous to the regions discussed in the primary sources. ARST 100 will explore the religious tradition, intellectual and civilizational background through which Ibn Battuta experienced his journey. Both courses will employ interdisciplinary and diachronic approaches to examine the evolution of ideas and material cultures across time and space. 

 

New Ways of Seeing: Producing Art in Contemporary Culture (LC23)
ARTS 220: Sculpture I and ARTS 119: Drawing I and FYSS 101
Jarod Charzewski and Yvette Dede
Studio Art
6 elective credits
CRNs: 11680* and 10020* and 13437*
Course times: TR 9:00-10:50 and MW 9:00-10:50 and M 4:00-4:50

*Contact your advisor or FYE to get an override into this class

This learning community will be a studio art collaboration between Sculpture I and Drawing I. Its purpose is to introduce the study of 2D and 3D art production as they are created in contemporary society. The term “Contemporary” will be defined as happening right now. This means techniques, concepts, and subject matters covered in this class will be accompanied by current examples from the art world and our global culture. We will place emphasis on professional practice through lectures, gallery visits, and visiting artists. These will also function as our connections to the art world. Through critiques students will learn the empowerment of language and critical discourse as we discuss materials, skill, aspects of form, space and presentation.

 

Sprechen Sie Business Tech? German Technology in South Carolina and Beyond (LC25)
GRMN 101: Elementary German and INFM 220: Management Information Systems and FYSS 101
Morgan Koerner and Iris Junglas
German and Supply Chain and Information Management
3 foreign language credits and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 11261 and 13479 and 13441
Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and TR 10:50-12:05 and T 5:05-5:55

German business is a global phenomenon with a tremendous local economic impact on the US and especially in South Carolina. There are over 200 German companies based in SC alone and over 40,000 jobs stem from German industry in the state! Given that German IT systems are a leader in the market, our learning community will explore the lucrative connections and career opportunities at the intersection of Management Information Systems and German. INFM 220 will provide an overview of information systems with an emphasis on building technological skills with some of the most prominent software applications, while German 101 will introduce students to the German language with an emphasis on business communication and etiquette as well as technological terminology.

 

 

First-Year Seminars:

The Life of the Senses
FYSE 105 and FYSS 101
Rebekah Compton
Art History
CRNs: 13261 and 13262
Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and W 6:00-6:50

How is life (both the good and the bad) affected by our sensory experiences? This course examines the five senses and the ways in which they shape our understanding of and relationship to other people, our environment, and ourselves. Throughout history, the senses have been both celebrated and condemned because of their ties to the body and emotions rather than to the rational intellect. Though often overlooked, the senses can play a direct role in spiritual states and experiences of transcendence. This course includes reading components (philosophical, fictional, and scientific writings on the senses) and experiential ones, in which students engage with heightened sensory experiences.

 

Pandemics in Human History, Present and Future
FYSE 108 and FYSS 101
Agnes Southgate
Biology
CRNs: 13467 and 13264
Course times: TR 3:05-4:20 and W 4:00-4:50 (ONLINE SYNC)

Pandemics have always been parts and shapers of human evolution and history, however the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemics caught most of us by surprise. In this seminar we will investigate viral biology and the human immune response to better understand the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on our health, but we will also reevaluate this pandemic in the light of past human encounters with microbes. We will discuss ways by which our global human society can fend this current crisis better, as well as prepare for the ones to come with an emphasis on global health in the context of ecological awareness and sustainability.

 

Race, Gender, and the Body (Critical Conversations Course)
FYSE 111 and FYSS 101
Kelly Jakes
Communication
CRNs: 13265 and 13266
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and M 11:00-11:50

This course introduces students to the idea of the body as a cultural construction and site of power formation. In recent years, the body has become increasingly significant across various disciplines, including Sociology, History, and Communication. Scholars from across these fields have shown that identity is constituted and performed through the body, and that the meanings that are ascribed to traits like skin color, hair, beauty, fitness, fatness/thinness, etc. have changed over time. Despite their constructed nature, these meanings appear to us as “natural” and become central to our own sense of who we are. During the semester, we will trouble these assumptions, examining the ways that various social institutions (the media, medicine, capitalism, religion, etc.) have used bodily norms to discipline us to behave as ideal men and women, citizens, and consumers.  

 

Comics and American Culture
FYSE 111 and FYSS 101
Julie Davis
Communication
CRNs: 13267 and 13268
Course Times: TR 9:25-10:40 and F 3:00-3:50

Perhaps no other art form has been as critically maligned, and yet as popular and influential as comics. Beginning in newspaper comic strips in the 1890’s, branching out into stand-alone books and magazines, and now spreading through many aspects of American culture, comics have and continue to create, reflect, and disseminate American culture. This course will study comics’ history and industry, as well as different genres of comics. Students will learn how comics come together, read a variety of comics, and critically engage them, through both discussion and written work. Topics will include the history or comics; various genres of comics; politics and comics; gender and comics; and comic transitions, which see comic stories and characters moving into other media.

 

Small for Big: Small Patterns to Solve the Big Problems YOU Care About
FYSE 112 and FYSS 101
RoxAnn Stalvey
Computer Science
CRNs: 13269 and 13270
Course Times: TR 9:25-10:40 and M 4:00-4:50 (ONLINE SYNC)

Pre-Med, Business, Arts ... whatever your area of interest, data abounds! Facts about your field, when turned into information, will lead to fantastic discoveries and advancements. In this course, students will cover the fundamentals of computational thinking in the study of non-computing disciplines. Topics will include ethical and social considerations of computing; data gathering and representation; logic and computational reasoning; data and procedural abstraction; problem decomposition; and code patterns for algorithmic problem-solving. Students will learn techniques to turn facts into information in an approachable way great for students from all disciplines. 

 

Economics of Globalization
FYSE 113 and FYSS 101
Beatriz Maldonado-Bird
International Studies/Economics
CRNs: 13271 and 13272
Course times: MWF 9:00-9:50 and W 8:00-8:50

This course introduces topics surrounding economic globalization. It examines the historic and current economic causes and consequences of global integration. Topics include the history of globalization, the role of international trade, post-WWII global monetary system and financial integration. It evaluates the arguments on both sides of the globalization debate as well as globalization's effects on domestic economies and policies, labor markets, production, and on the environment (among other topics).

  

Breaking Silence: The Writer in the Community
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Marjory Wentworth
English
CRNs: 13567 and 13569
Course Times: TR 3:05-4:20 (ONLINE SYNC) and M 5:05-5:55 (ONLINE SYNC)

Through reading and creative writing, students will examine what it means to be a writer in the community. Students will develop creative writing competency and craft. This is an introductory creative writing class which requires no previous experience. Course readings will examine how writers employ elements of craft to produce works that break silences. Writing exercises will explore how creative writing can serve as a tool for empowerment and social change. Students will write reflection journals, poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction which includes autobiography, testimonials and life stories. Through this process students will learn how to develop a compassionate and critical eye for creative work both inside and outside the classroom. 

 

Banned Books
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Marjory Wentworth
English
CRNs: 13568 and 13570
Course Times: TR 1:40-2:55 (ONLINE SYNC) and R 4:05-4:55 (ONLINE SYNC)

This course examines a variety of texts that have been banned across several centuries  and continents. Texts have been seized or outlawed, classified as taboo, their authors fined, jailed, tortured, exiled and killed throughout history under many different political regimes. The focus is literature from the past two centuries, spanning diverse cultural and political contexts, as well as some films now considered “classics.” In America, many writers of our most beloved books have experienced the sting of censorship and distorted judgement aimed at their work. Recent contempt for the news media will be examined within its unique role in our democracy. We will also incorporate contemporary First Amendment issues–especially in terms of the internet (social media).

 

Writers Change the World
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Bret Lott
English
CRNs: 13273 and 13274
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and W 8:00-8:50

Writers change the world. Novels, stories, poems, essays all have this in common: they transform hearts and minds; they guide us, exhort us, teach us, entertain us. What writers make reaches into the lives of readers in lasting and meaningful ways that can change the course of history. This course looks at ways to make your mark in the world of words by creating your own stories and poems and essays. Through the study of many acclaimed works and visiting guest writers, students will explore the practice of creativity and why writing matters.

 

Charleston Writers
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Julia Eichelberger
English
CRNs: 13275 and 13276
Course times: MW 5:30-6:45 and T 5:05-5:55

Students will explore interpretations of Charleston and its diverse inhabitants in three novels. Why We Never Danced the Charleston portrays Charleston in the 1920s, The Cigar Factory covers 1900 through 1946, and Rich in Love takes place in the 1980s. We'll also read selected folktales from the early 1900s and The Birth of All Things (2020) by Charleston's Poet Laureate.  Each author goes beyond stereotypes, offering a unique point of view on living in Charleston. Some residents face hostility from their neighbors, and some seek to redefine themselves and their communities and to connect with people different from themselves. Students will discuss these works and research the authors' lives and the locations, people, and events that inspired these works. We'll do archival research, visit locations, and meet some of the authors. Students will also create their own interpretations of Charleston in 2021.

 

Ecology and the Literary Imagination
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Terence Bowers
English
CRNs: 13277 and 13278
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and M 6:00-6:50

In this course, we will consider a number of big questions:  What should our relationship to the natural world be?  Is having a close connection to nature important for living a good life?  Do we have ethical obligations to other living things?  Do we need to imagine our relationship to nature in a new way?  To answer these questions productively, we will critically read a wide variety of texts (stories, poems, essays) and consider various artworks (films, paintings, photography) that explore our relationship to nature.  Thinking about such issues is especially important for us now as inhabitants of what scientists label the Anthropocene—the current geological era in which human beings are the primary cause of profound changes to the earth’s ecosystems.

 

Get Me Bodied: Integrating Mind and Body in the Writing Process
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Meg Scott-Copses
English
CRNs: 13279 and 13280
Course Times: TR 9:25-10:40 and W 4:00-4:50

This course will examine problems of culturally-inherited mind/body dualism and dismantle the belief that writing is primarily a cerebral act. Students will move toward more embodied practices of composing, learning, and thinking. This means students will be mentally and physically active—moving, engaging our senses, and creating ideas together with what we might call our “bodymind.” This course will also address contradictory messages received from media and culture about the norms and rules for our bodies, asking tough questions about what kinds and shapes of bodies are most valued in our society. Students will work together to find new perspectives and solutions that respect and include all bodies.

  

The 1967 Legacy and Beyond (Critical Conversations Course)
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Valerie Frazier
English
CRNs: 13281 and 13282
Course Times: TR 10:50-12:05 and R 3:05-3:55

CofC’s first black graduate Eddie Ganaway once said of his experience, “It was almost like Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. I did get the sense that I was being looked through.” (College of Charleston Magazine, 2007). In this class, students will ask: “How can we increase visibility and shine a light on black student trailblazers so that the community can better acknowledge and appreciate their contributions?” The course will introduce students to the significance of the year 1967 (the year of desegregation), black student contributions at the College, and the history of black Charleston. The course also connects students with the Charleston area through lectures, workshops, and community engagement activities.

 

Reading the Female Gothic
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Susan Farrell
English
CRNs: 13694 and 13695
Course Times: TR 12:15-1:30 and M 4:00-4:50 (ONLINE SYNC)

Mystery, fear, obsession, and romance mark the genre of Gothic fiction, a tradition that women have long been involved in—as authors, characters, and readers. This class focuses on how women helped create, develop, and revise the Gothic genre, often adding gender considerations to more traditional Gothic elements. Students will explore themes of dangerous fathers and absent mothers, domestic entrapment within patriarchal societies, repressed female sexuality, and transgressive behavior among women. The cousre will also examine issues of intersectionality and race, exploring how women writers of color have adopted the Gothic tradition as their own. Featured authors will range from Mary Shelley and Jane Austen to more contemporary writers such as Shirley Jackson, Joyce Carol Oates, and Toni Morrison

 

Financial Literacy for Generation Z
FYSE 115 and FYSS 101
Jocelyn Evans
Finance
CRNs: 13283 and 13284
Course times: TR 8:00-9:15 (ONLINE SYNC) and W 3:00-3:50 (ONLINE SYNC)

Steve Cocheo, Executive Editor at The Financial Brand, states that, “Money freaks Gen Z out, creating opportunity for financial marketers." Apparently, one of the top stressors is money, followed by post-graduation employment, health-related concerns and the overall economy. The current generation enters college without much formal education in personal financial management skills, even though their college years will require them to make many decisions related to the above concerns. This course will navigate these literacy challenges. The subject matter is on money management skills, career planning, job health care options, and understanding what drives the overall economy. Academic instruction is supplemented by speakers from the university and financial industry professionals.

 

Interpreting our National Treasures: From Parks to Moon Rocks
FYSE 117 and FYSS 101
Cassandra Runyon
Geology
CRNs: 13291 and 13292
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and R 3:05-3:55 (ONLINE SYNC)

National Treasures: From Parks to Moon Rocks will explore some of our country’s greatest natural treasures. America’s national parks and our nearest planetary neighbor, the Moon, were formed by violent geologic processes, yet yield stunning landscapes and similar compositions. This course will compare and contrast key geologic processes that formed the Earth and Moon and the methods and tools used to explore them.

  

Swimming in Plastic Soup
FYSE 117 and FYSS 101
Barbara Beckingham
Geology
CRNs: 13293 and 13294
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and R 4:05-4:55 (ONLINE SYNC)

Today, we are swimming in plastic soup. From reports of microscopic plastic particles in bottled drinking water and biomarkers of plastic exposure in human tissues, to entanglement of turtles and dolphins in marine debris, and clogging of urban waterways with litter, the symptoms of our plastic society are being felt in ways that may impact the future of ecological and human health. What is plastic, and how did it get in the soup?! This sustainability-focused* course will explore the invention of our plastic world and analyze it's sustainability into the future, highlighting creative economic, socio-political, and environmental solutions to this local and global issue.

 

The History of Stuff: A Global History of Consumption and Waste (A-B)
FYSE 121 and FYSS 101
John Cropper
History
(A) CRNs: 13299 and 13300
(A) Course times: MW 5:30-6:45 and W 4:00-4:50
(B) CRNs: 13301 and 13302
(B) Course times: MW 7:00-8:15pm and M 4:00-4:50

Every day, Americans consume and discard goods purchased from the supermarket, the local café down the street, large retailers like Walmart and Home Depot, and upscale electronic stores that offer the newest Apple or Google products. While these commodities---from smartphones and televisions to plastic bottles and snack food have become commonplace in our culture, we rarely take the time to step back and think about where all this "stuff" actually comes from, let alone the deep historical processes that have made these products so ubiquitous in contemporary society. This course takes up this task by conducting a global history of consumption and waste from 1600 to the present, and it will examine how the diffusion of "stuff throughout the globe has long shaped processes of cultural, social, economic, and environmental change over time.

 

Deconstructing the Nation: Politics, Identity and Race in Modern Times (Critical Conversations Course)
FYSE 124 and FYSS 101
Joshua Shanes
Jewish Studies
(A) CRNs: 13285 and 13286
(A) Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and T 3:05-3:55
(B) CRNs: 13287 and 13288
(B) Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and M 9:00-9:50

Nations today seem to be a self-evident reality. The nation is the core unit of political legitimacy for a sovereign state, while the “United Nations” is the platform for humanity’s cooperative decision-making. Yet nations are neither ancient nor self-evident entities; they are modern constructions that compete with other forms of community and identities for legitimacy and loyalty. Even the basic question, “what is a nation,” brings no uniform answer. Nation-states and nationalism can bond communities, but they are also sources of violent conflict and oppression and have facilitated some of the most barbaric acts in human history. This seminar will explore the origins and development of nations and nationalism, comparing various versions of the phenomenon and consider what all of this means for us today, as Americans at a time of heightened nationalist feelings and growing awareness of racial oppression. The course will raise basic questions about identity, community, religion, ethnicity, and the human condition.

 

Film and Media in Israel
FYSE 124 and FYSS 101
Yaron Ayalon (A) and Noa Weinberg (B)
Jewish Studies

(A) CRNs: 13289 and 13290
(A) Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and R 5:05-5:55
(B) CRNs: 13803 and 13804
(B) Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and T 3:05-3:55

The course will introduce students to Israeli politics and culture via class discussions and assigned readings, as well as primary sources in the form of film, music, television segments, and short stories. Students will engage such materials throughout the semester via class discussions and short written assignments. Topics will include the political system, the economy, religion and state, immigration, and education. 

 

Global Perspectives: Madrid and Andalusia
SPAN 202 and FYSS 101
Carmen Grace
Hispanic Studies
3 Foreign Language Credits
CRNs: 13295 and 13296
Course Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and M 3:00-3:50

Students will take the language requirement of Spanish 202 with an intensive cultural component about Madrid, the Capital of Spain, and the eclectic southern region of Andalusia. Some of the aspects that will be covered are geography and history, art and architecture, cuisine and festivals. 

  

Global Perspectives: Barcelona and the Mediterranean Coast
SPAN 202 and FYSS 101
Daniel Delgado
Hispanic Studies
3 Foreign Language Credits
CRNs: 13297 and 13298
Course Times: TR 9:25-10:40 and W 5:00-5:50

While following the requirements for SPAN 202 and its departmental curriculum, this course will also focus on the Cultural Practices, Products and Perspectives of the Spanish Mediterranean Coast with an emphasis on two of its most famous cities, Barcelona and Valencia. We will explore the history, traditions, local languages, architecture, art, music, gastronomy, politics and internationally renowned people of one of the most famous regions in Spain. With the use of supplementary materials, such as readings, videos, films and music, students will gain a better understanding of the cultural richness of this unique region, and at the same time, they will be able to gain new vocabulary and practice grammar by speaking, reading and writing in the target language. 

 

Not Just World Cup Soccer: Business and Culture in Brazil
FYSE 125 and FYSS 101
Daniela Meireles
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: 13309 and 13310
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and R 8:05-8:55

This course is taught in English and intersects Business and Brazilian Studies. Brazil and the U.S. are important trading partners and both countries hold crucial positions in international operations globally. Students will navigate complex intercultural negotiations between Americans and Brazilians. This course will prepare students for personal and business-related and cultural interactions with Brazilians in the U.S. and abroad. Students will explore cultural case studies, photography, documentaries, music, literature, and digital media produced by both Americans and by Brazilians.

 

The Border
FYSE 125 and FYSS 101
Sarah Owens
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: 13311 and 13312
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and R 3:05-3:55

From drug cartels, to migrant workers, to innocent children, to political asylum, the border between the United States and Mexico has multiple meanings for people. This boundary established relatively recently between 1849 and 1855 will be the subject of this class. Based on The Line Becomes A River by Francisco Cantú (a former border patrol agent), this course will introduce students to the complexities of border issues. Additionally, through other works of literature, film, art, and virtual reality, students will gain a nuanced perspective of the reasons that migrants choose to cross this dangerous line.

Beyond Narcos and Latin Lovers: Studies in Film
FYSE 125 and FYSS 101
Liana Hakobyan
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: 13609 and 13610
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 (ONLINE SYNC) and W 6:00-6:50

Although Hispanics make up 18% of the U.S. population, they continue to be underrepresented in mainstream cinema. Historically, cinematic representation has often been limited to a commodification of stereotypical characters such as narcos, Latin lovers, and curvy Latinas. This course, on the other hand, will provide a study of contemporary filmmaking by and about Hispanics and Hispanic-Americans with the aim of challenging such stereotypical representations by looking into various aspects of the Hispanic experience in the U.S. From stories of love and coming of age to immigrant mothers and diverse identities, these films will introduce you to the Hispanic experience in our country and the conditions that have contributed to the formation of Hispanic-American identities. We will learn to view films through an analytical and critical eye, in order to understand the relationship between images and societal constructions of Hispanic identities, as well as the issues facing these and other minoritized populations across the US.

 

Courage and How to See It
FYSE 129 and FYSS 101
Jennifer Baker
Philosophy
CRNs: 13313 and 13314
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and W 8:00-8:50

In this course students will begin with recent complaints from psychologists about our culture of "safetyism" and consider what bravery requires in response. Students will examine ethical accounts of bravery, warrior ethos, and ways in which we can be brave in our daily lives. Questions addressed include: Who do you consider a hero? What other character traits do you admire? Do you have role-models with these traits? Do everyday activities require bravery? Can we ourselves develop virtue, and come to be brave? What steps would be involved? Are the particular roles in society that require bravery appreciated and well-designed? Do heroes change their culture or reflect it? How does life go, for a hero? This is an ideal course for an introduction to philosophy and academic study in general.

 

Race and Ethnicity in American Comedic Fiction (Critical Conversations Course)
FYSE 129 and FYSS 101
Larry Krasnoff
Philosophy
CRNs: 13315 and 13316
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and T 3:05-3:55

Discussions of systemic racism sometimes suggest that our culture has been constructed in ways that exclude Black contributions. In this class, we will study the ways in which American comedy has always been obsessed with Black voices. By examining works of comedic literature by white, Black, and Jewish-American authors, together with video and audio of other forms of comedic performance, we will come to understand that American comedy is the expression of a kind of cultural anxiety that returns again and again to the instability of racial hierarchies.

 

The Physics of Minecraft
FYSE 130 and FYSS 101
Gardner Marshall
Physics
CRNs: 13317 and 13318
Course times: MWF 9:00-9:50 and W 10:00-10:50

Some pretty crazy things can happen in Minecraft, but how realistic is its physics? Just how far can a creeper blow you into the air? What about TNT? If you run and jump off a cliff in Minecraft, where will you land? Would you land near that spot in real life (please don’t try!)? What if you try to cram one hundred cows into a single block? This course explores the physics governing the Minecraft universe by doing experiments in Minecraft worlds to figure it out. Students will learn about real-world physics to compare and contrast how things work in Minecraft with how they work in the real world.

 

Hurricanes and their Impact on Society
FYSE 130 and FYSS 101
Gabriel Williams
Physics
CRNs: 13319 and 13320
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and F 4:00-4:50

The hurricane is one of nature’s most intense phenomena and one of the coastal resident’s greatest fears. The goal of this course is to provide a portrait of the interrelated scientific and societal aspects of hurricanes. Students will see that the study of hurricanes is not merely a complex scientific question, but it is a multidisciplinary question that involves socioeconomic, demographic, and resource factors that work in concert to inform public policy. Students will be given a big picture overview of the holistic perspective needed to study hurricanes and the hazards they produce.

 

Climate Fiction and the Possibility of Justice
FYSE 131 and FYSS 101
Claire Curtis
Political Science
CRNs: 13321 and 13322
Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and M 4:00-4:50

What kind of novel might one write about Manhattan under water or Phoenix in a water crisis? Climate fiction (or Cli-fi) is a category of post-apocalyptic fiction that imagines different futures based on a radically changing climate. These novels ask what life might look like under conditions of drought or flood or sea rise or any of the sequences of those environmental changes (economic collapse, war, disease). And how do we expect that living together to look? Is it all fear and violence? In this class students will read a selection of cli-fi novels and short stories alongside Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach to justice, which argues that justice should ask "what can people do and be?" Can we find justice in these fictional accounts?

 

Epic Trauma: The Psychological Impact of War
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Amy Kolak
Psychology
CRNS: 13323 and 13324
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and T 8:05-8:55

To broaden our perspective on the psychology of war, we will turn to the classics and how Greek authors dealt with anger, fear, sadness, guilt, and shame. Specifically, Homer's epic poems, The Iliad and The Odyssey, will be used to highlight the devastating effects that war has on individual well-being (i.e., the extent to which exposure to conflict "undoes" one's character) and social relationships (i.e., with friends, family, and the broader community). This course will then discuss the themes and experiences of those exposed to modern day conflict (the past 100 years). It will also examine contemporary research and practice related to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, including the broad array of emotions that may be experienced in response to conflict.

 

Psychology of Travel
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Chelsea Reid-Short
Psychology
CRNs: 13326 and 13327
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and M 8:00-8:50 (ONLINE SYNC)

In this course, students will seek to understand how travel impacts individuals, close relationships, broader social groups, and the larger world by reviewing and applying psychological scientific research and theory. This course will examine how travel affects our mental and physical health, relationship quality, and work productivity, and we will discuss challenges that individuals of different demographic groups may face when traveling. Students will also examine how our travel may impact people who live and work at the locations to which we travel, and how our travel can impact our attitudes and behaviors toward other cultures and social groups. Finally, students will examine how travel may impact our natural environment and surrounding world, including a focus on sustainability and eco-tourism.

 

The Problems and Perils of Agriculture: Growing Regenerative Solutions in the 21st Century
FYSE 134 and FYSS 101
Todd LeVasseur
Humanities and Social Sciences
CRNs: 13328 and 13329
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and M 3:00-3:50

This course explores the impact of human agricultural systems and dietary choices on planetary, environmental, social, and physical health.  It analyzes the impact of the agricultural revolution on soils, animals, and society, and does the same for “Green Revolution” (i.e. industrial, chemical-based, monoculture) agriculture of the 20th century.  Sustainable solutions based on regenerative models (both agricultural and also social/political) will then be explored, where these models advocate for political, economic, environmental, and social sustainability.  

  

Who Do Voodoo? We all Do! Exploring Magic and Ritual in Religions Familiar and Strange
FYSE 134 and FYSS 101
Lenny Lowe
Religious Studies
CRNs: 13485 and 13331
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and T 3:05-3:55

Voodoo dolls, zombies, and witchdoctors – the popular portrayal of Black Atlantic religious practices makes them seem strange, magical, and even dangerous. But how different are these ritual practices from the practices of much more familiar “religions”? To answer that question, this course will closely examine “Black Atlantic” religions like Haitian Vodou, Brazilian Candomblé, and Cuban Santeria as well as the ritual practices of more familiar traditions like American Evangelicalism. By focusing on theoretical approaches to ritual and concepts like “magic” and “religion,” we will uncover surprising points of continuity that suggest that, at least some of the time, we all “do Voodoo.”

 

American Popular Culture (A-B)
FYSE 135 and FYSS 101
Paul Roof
Sociology
(A) CRNs: 13332 and 13333
(A) Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and T 6:05-6:55
(B) CRNs: 13334 and 13335
(B) Course times: MW 3:25-4:40 and T 4:05-4:55

This course is designed to introduce students to critical analysis of contemporary popular culture in the United States.  Students will get an overview of the insights, findings, concepts, and perspectives that are held by a wide variety of interdisciplinary popular culture scholars today.  Several prominent areas of popular culture to be studied include advertising, television, film, music, religion, and cyberculture.

 

Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: More Than Just a Movie
FYSE 136 and FYSS 101
Kent Gourdin
Supply Chain and Information Management
CRNs: 13336 and 13337
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and R 8:05-8:55

Most consumers have little concern for how the products they purchase reach stores. Despite the fact that these come from all over the world, most of us only notice those instances when what we want is not available. We know we live in a port city, perhaps notice a big ship when it is in the harbor, or curse all of the trucks moving containers on our roadways, but we never give a thought to what they represent. This course will introduce students to the fascinating areas of global transportation, logistics, and supply chain management which work together to get us the products we want, when we want them, at a price we are willing to pay.

 

Teaching Fellows
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Tracey Hunter-Doniger
Teacher Education
CRNs: 13338 and 13339
Course times: R 1:00-3:45 and W 3:00-3:50

This course is specifically designed for freshmen Teaching Fellows and Call Me Mister students. These students have chosen education as their major and profession in return from the State of South Carolina. This course is the first in a series of learning experiences for students who will teach in South Carolina schools after graduation. Content of this course will focus on issues in education including but not limited to, best practices, integrated learning, and Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT).  This course is designed to help students adjust to college life and excel as future educators. This course is open only to pre-selected Teaching Fellows and Call Me Misters.

 

Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Susan Flynn
Teacher Education
CRNs: 13340 and 13341
Course times: W 3:00-6:00 and M 8:00-8:50

Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics course is designed to provide students interested in pursuing a degree in occupational and physical therapy as well as teacher education, with the knowledge and skills to design and implement movement experiences to enhance children's physical, social and emotional development. Students may be able to participate in the FitCatZ Aquatic and Motor Program putting theory to practice teaching young children with disabilities in a therapy setting or participate in a virtual therapy guest speaker series.

 

The Power of Play for Young Children’s Learning and Development
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Kelley White
Teacher Education
CRNs: 13342 and 13343
Course times: MW 9:25-10:40 and T 5:05-5:55

This course will explore how children learn through play. It will begin with a focus on defining play and exploring research and theoretical perspectives on the importance of play for children’s cognitive, physical and social-emotional development. Students will visit a variety of schools, museums, and outdoor play spaces around town to observe firsthand how adults best facilitate and advance children’s playful learning.  These visits will allow students to practice observing and documenting young children’s learning through the use of note taking and photo documentation. At the end of the semester, students will work collaboratively with classmates to apply what was learned and design their own play-based learning experiences for young children.

 

Reading Hamilton: Hip-Hop and History in the American Musical
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Susan Kattwinkel
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 13348 and 13349
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and M 5:00-5:50

This course will examine Lin-Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton for how it has changed the ways we look at both American musical theatre and American history. We will look at other sources from historical writings and American musicals, and we’ll examine Hamilton’s music, lyrics, and staging in detail to ask and answer questions about America’s stories. How does the show’s modern popular music help tell the story of the “founding fathers”? Whose story is told? How do the stories we tell about America change over time? How do you want your story told?

  

Voices of Diversity: Playwrights and Characters
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Evan Parry
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 13350 and 13351
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and R 5:05-5:55

This course will examine dramatic literature from Greek tragedy to the present day, focusing on playwrights and characters whose race, gender, sexuality or accessibility sets them apart from the world of the play or the world in which it was written. In addition, the course will include performance projects of scenes and portions of plays, to be directed, acted, designed and dramaturged entirely by members of the class. Some of these projects will be performed for the public.

  

Behind the Curtain: Exploring the World of Live Theatre
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Glenda Byars
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 13352 and 13353
Course times: MW 3:25-4:40 and R 4:05-4:55

This is a survey course designed to introduce the student to many aspects of the live theatre experience and practice. This includes dramatic literature, playwriting, “show business”, acting and directing, design elements and techniques, and critical evaluation of plays and specific productions. The objective is to increase the students’ understanding and appreciation of the role of theatre in society and as an art form through live theatre attendance, active participation, lecture and reading.

 

Dancing on Stage and Screen: Investigating the Perspective of the Audience
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Kristin Alexander
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 13354 and 13355
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and R 4:05-4:55

The Golden Age of Cinema and Television changed the accessibility of viewing dance, and now more than ever, dance is right at our fingertips.  How does this type of accessibility affect the audience perspective?  Does it help or hinder the desire to attend live dance performances?  Dancing on Stage and Screen will look at performances of all genres of dance in both live and recorded forms, prompting an investigation of the audience perspective. Historical perspective, contemporary trends, artist intent and personal aesthetic will all be discussed.  Additionally, the course will cover dance  films and choreography intended for the camera.  

 

Connecting with Nature in the Modern World
FYSE 142 and FYSS 101
Nick Principe
Environmental Studies
CRNs: 13356 and 13357
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and T 8:00-8:50

We know that spending quality time in nature can quickly wash away the worries of the day and if done regularly, can improve our well-being. The question is, if nature is so beneficial for us, then why are we a nation of people who seem to be more uncoupled from nature than ever before? In this course, students will examine ways in which we can connect with the natural world around us, both individually and as a society. The class will explore research on the effects of nature on mental well-being, the state of modern food production, and how reconnecting with nature might just give us a fighting chance against biodiversity loss and the effects of climate change.

 

AR U Experienced?: Introduction to Augmented and Virtual Reality
FYSE 143 and FYSS 101
Joey Van Arnhem
College of Charleston Libraries
CRNs: 13358 and 13359
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 (ONLINE SYNC) and R 3:05-3:55 (ONLINE SYNC)

The blurring of lines between fine art, global pop culture, and science, require a level of information/visual literacy in order to decode the visual culture that surrounds us in order to become active participants and creators rather than passive consumers. Students will examine the technologies behind augmented and virtual reality and explore their history and societal effects. Students will consider Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) works and texts (apps, images, film, television, video, advertisements, performance art: any artifacts of culture) and their significance as cultural documents. The course is designed to teach and demonstrate some of the basic tools of analysis and critical thinking with which to approach contemporary texts presented through the lens of augmented and virtual realities.