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Fall 2018

Students choose to complete either a Learning Community or a First-Year Seminar to complete the FYE graduation requirement.Learning Communities (LC) link two academic courses (6-8 credit hours). Faculty teaching these courses work together to establish joint activities and common curriculum themes designed to explore the ways in which subjects are interrelated. All Learning Communities fulfill the FYE Graduation Requirement in addition to counting towards other general education requirements (listed with each LC).

A First-Year Seminar (FYSE) is an academic course (3 credit hours) that explores special topics taught by outstanding faculty.

All FYE courses have an attached Synthesis Seminar (FYSS). Upperclassmen serve as peer facilitators and lead weekly 50-minute synthesis seminars that introduce students to the College’s academic community. The synthesis seminar component offers the advantage of getting the perspective of and advice from a successful College of Charleston student.

Students must be enrolled in all parts of their Learning Community (including all science labs) or First-Year Seminar to receive credit.


Sustainability Related and Sustainability Focused*
Social and Environmental Justice through Film
Biomimicry: Nature as Mentor
You Are What You Wear: Just Fashion
*Courses count towards CofC's Sustainability Literacy Scholar Program 

Experiencing Charleston and the Lowcountry
The Gullah Community: Ethnographic Research in Memory and Identity
If These Buildings Could Talk: Architecture and Historic Preservation through Charleston (LC)
Sending the ‘Write’ Message: Managing Tourism in Charleston (LC)
The Wonderful World of Real Estate According to King Street
Exploring the Arts and Cultural Ecosystem of the Lowcountry
Math in Motion: Teaching and Learning Math Through Movement, Walking, and Sight-Seeing
 
Countries and Cultures, Past and Present
Global Perspectives: ¡Barcelona!(SPAN 202)
City of Light: A History of Paris (LC)
Experiencing Ancient Rome (LC)
Great Civilizations: Exploring Asia (LC)
Language and Religion (LC)
Spanish Panorama: The Culture, Language, and Geography of Spain (LC)
Sprechen Sie Business? German Business in South Carolina and Beyond (LC)
Chinese Culture Through Cinema: Kung Fu and Culture Conflict
Children and the Holocaust
The City of Light: A History of Paris
Party Like It’s 1899
What is Nation?
The Beautiful and the Good: Art, Ethics, and Culture in Japan
Beyond the Grave: What Old Cemeteries Tell and Teach the Living
 
Engaging with Contemporary Issues
Human Rights in Latin America
Communication and Advocacy (LC)
Feminist Jiu-Jitsu for Self-Defense (LC)
Psychology of Women’s Studies and Gender Issues (LC)
Society and the Individual (LC)
Economics of Globalization
History in the News
The US and Globalization
Sociology of Food
American Popular Culture

Education and Development
The Pursuit of Happiness
Working Lives
Emerging Adulthood: The Age of Possibilities
Teaching Fellows
Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics
Learn it, Live it, Give it: Mentoring and Youth Development
Exploring Cultural Strengths and Diversity through Storytelling
 
Technology, Science, Nature and Health
From Russia with Code: Cybersecurity & Russia (LC)
Biology and Chemistry for Pre-Med Students (LC)
Gateway to Neuroscience (LC)
STEM-SCAMP (LC)
Is it All in Your Head?: Wellness of Body and Mind (LC)
Heavy Metals and Wall Street
Preparing the World for the Coming Apocalypse (LC)
Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: More Than Just a Movie
Evolution for Everyone
Hooked: Fish, Fisheries, and Food for the Future
 
Engaging Our World Through the Arts, Literature, and Religion
Photography, History, and Memories
Beyond the Surface: Writing About the Screen, Stage, and Page (LC)
Art, Sustainability, and Activism (LC)
New Ways of Seeing: Producing Art in Contemporary Culture (LC)
Ghost Stories
The Weird, the Frightening, and the Future: Pop Culture and Identity in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
World Music East and West
Banned Books
Harry Potter and the Human Condition
Authoring Addiction: Literary and Cultural Narratives of Drugs and Alcohol Abuse
Behind the Curtain: Exploring the World of Live Theatre
Revolutionary Poets Society: Slam poetry, spoken word, and adolescent life
Gender and Sexuality on Stage and Screen
 

Learning Communities:

Beyond the Surface: Writing About the Screen, Stage, and Page (LC1)
ENGL 110: Introduction to Academic Writing and THTR 176: Introduction to Theatre and FYSS 101
Malinda McCollum and Mark Landis
English and Theatre
4 English and 3 humanities credits
CRNs: 13528 and 13531 and 13532
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40, T 8:25-9:15 and TR 12:15-1:30 and R 3:05-3:55 PM

Students will analyze theatre, visual arts, advertising, and popular culture in order to develop arguments about the effects and messages in a variety of texts. Students will consider each text’s layers of meaning, studying details in order to build claims about what the text evokes or suggests.  In THTR 176, students will attend several plays and be presented with writing assignments that ask students to articulate the participation of their own hearts and minds when joined with an audience at the theatre.  In ENGL 110, students will explore how ads, TV shows, films, photos, and posters use images to present arguments, reinforce and/or challenge cultural values, and influence viewers.

From Russia with Code: Cybersecurity & Russia (LC2)
RUSS 101: Elementary Russian I and CSCI 111: Introduction to Cybersecurity and FYSS 101
Meglena Miltcheva and Lancie Affonso
Russian and Computer Science
3 foreign language and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 10160 and 13266 and 13545
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and TR 9:55-11:10 and F 3:00-3:50 PM

In recent years, Russian cybercrime has become the most dangerous threat to the US computer security systems. Government and businesses are scrambling to find Cybersecurity experts who specialize in Russian. This learning community helps you to acquire this much-needed expertise in the connections between Russia and Cybersecurity. RUSS 101 introduces the Cyrillic alphabet and Russian language, with a focus on computer vocabulary. CSCI 199 focuses on the domains of cybersecurity with specific examples applied to the Russian attacks. We will cover the following domain areas and touch on specific Russian attacks that penetrated the area in question: Access control and identity management, cryptography, policies, procedures, and awareness, physical security, perimeter defenses,  network defenses, host defenses, application defenses, and data defenses.

Biology and Chemistry for Pre-Med Students (LC3 A-B)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L*:  Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and CHEM 111**: Principles of Chemistry and CHEM 111L: Principles of Chemistry Lab and FYSS 101
Kathleen Janech and Pam Riggs-Gelasco and Kristin Krantzman/Jeff Tomlinson
Biology and Chemistry and Chemistry
8 natural science credits***
(A) CRNs: 10101 and 11542 and 10186 and 13552
(A) Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and MWF 10:00-10:50 and T 12:30-3:30 and W 8:00-8:50 AM
(B) CRNs: 13556 and 11543 and 10191 and 13563
(B) Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and MWF 10:00-10:50 and T 4:30-7:30 and W 8:00-8:50 AM

This learning community is tailored to incoming first-year students with a strong desire to pursue a career in medicine or in biomedical research. The fields of Chemistry and Biology are increasingly intertwined and faculty will use these two introductory courses to demonstrate the natural connections between the fields.
* Students must enroll in BIOL 111L separately for full enrollment in this Learning Community
** Math 111 is a pre-requisite or co-requisite for CHEM 111.  Alternatively, students who place into calculus via the Math Aleks placement exam can enroll in CHEM 111.
***4 credits towards natural science general education requirements and 4 credits towards science major.

City of Light: A History of Paris (LC4)
FREN 101: Elementary French and FYSE 121: City of Light and FYSS 101
Lisa Signori and Bill Olejniczak
French and History
3 foreign language and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 10254 and 13568 and 13570
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and MWF 11:00-11:50 and R 5:05-5:55 PM

In this interdisciplinary learning community, students will learn about Paris, including its political, social, economic, and cultural history, art and architecture, literature, philosophy, and language.  Linking FYSE 121 with FREN 101 adds a strong historical component to FREN 101 and an enhanced linguistic and cultural component to FYSE 121.  Students will acquire the skills of a historian as they explore Paris from its ancient beginnings to modern times through film, fictional works, and historical accounts.

Communication and Advocacy (LC5)
COMM 104: Public Speaking and ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Julie Davis and Caroline Hunt
Communication and English
3 elective and 4 English credits
CRNs: 11138 and 10409 and 13611
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and MWF 10:00-10:50, W 9:00-9:50 and T 6:05-6:55 PM

Being able to persuasively and effectively support, oppose, or request some idea, cause or other item is the heart of advocacy, and important for both personal and professional success.  The linked courses in this learning community will introduce students to the strategies, techniques, and ethical implications involved in the advocacy process.  It will examine advocacy at many different levels: self, individual, other, group, corporate, and issue. Students will learn how to both create effective advocacy messages and critically evaluate the messages they encounter.

Experiencing Ancient Rome (LC6)
LATN 101: Introduction to Latin and CLAS 102: Roman Civilization and FYSS 101
James Lohmar and Allison Strerrett-Krause
Classics
3 foreign language and 3 humanities credits
CRNs: 10333 and 13711 and 13619
Course times: MWF 12:00-12:50 and TR 9:25-10:40 and M 4:00-4:50 PM

This course is an introduction to the daily lives of the Romans through study of literature, history, material culture, and language. Classics 102 explores Roman religion, entertainment, politics, and family life using archaeological evidence and literature. Latin 101 introduces the basics of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary while translating adapted and original Latin passages that complement many of the civilization topics and authors read in Classics 102.

Gateway to Neuroscience (LC7 A-B)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L*: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and PSYC 103: Intro to Psychological Science and FYSS 101
Chris Korey and Dan Greenberg
Biology and Psychology
4 natural science and 3 social science credits
(A) CRNs: 13631 and 13632 and 13633
(A) Course times: MWF 2:00-2:50 and TR 9:25-10:40 and T 4:05-4:55 PM
(B) CRNs: 13634 and 13635 and 13636
(B) Course times: MWF 2:00-2:50 and TR 9:25-10:40 and T 3:05-3:55 PM

This learning community is aimed at entering first-year students with an interest in Neuroscience, particularly the interface of Psychology and Biology. These courses will demonstrate and reinforce the inherent, extensive connections between the two disciplines. PSYC 103 will introduce students to the science of behavior with special emphasis on the biological bases of behavior (neuroscience) and psychological disorders. BIOL 111 focuses on molecular and cellular biology, with a focus on basic nervous system function and the underlying biological mechanisms associated with neurological disorders.
*Students must enroll in BIOL 111L separately for full enrollment in this Learning Community

If These Buildings Could Talk: Architecture and Historic Preservation through Charleston (LC8 A-B)
ARTH 105: Introduction to Architecture and HPCP 199: Introduction to Historic Preservation and FYSS 101
Gayle Goudy and Ashton Finley
Art and Architectural History and Historic Preservation and Community Planning
6 humanities credits
(A) CRNs: 12419 and 12420 and 13637
(A) Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and MWF 10:00-10:50 and M 5:00-5:50 PM
(B) CRNs: 12464 and 12465 and 13747
(B) Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and MWF 10:00-10:50 and F 4:00-4:50 PM

Using the historic city of Charleston as our laboratory this learning community will introduce students to the world of architecture and historic preservation. The Architectural History portion will cover Western architecture from ancient to contemporary focusing on styles represented locally. The Historic Preservation portion introduces students to heritage management and preservation issues focusing on Charleston examples through field trips and studying buildings in situ. Students will write stylistic analyses, learn basic architectural terminology, and learn to research and analyze architectural and historical significance using primary source material.

Sending the ‘Write’ Message: Managing Tourism in Charleston (LC9 A-B and LC10 A-B)
HTMT 210: Principles and Practices in Hospitality and Tourism Management and ENGL 110: Introduction to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Bob Frash and Rosanna Hendrix Durst
Hospitality and Tourism Management and English
3 elective credits and 4 English credits
(9A) CRNs: 11325 and 13639 and 13640
(9A) Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and TR 8:00-9:15am, R 9:25-10:15am and W 4:00-4:50 PM
(9B) CRNs: 14063 and 14065 and 14064
(9B) Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and TR 10:50-12:05, R 9:50-10:40 and W 5:00-5:50 PM
(10A) CRNs: 10578 and 13643 and 13644
(10A) Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and TR 10:50-12:05, R 9:50-10:40 and W 5:00-5:50 PM
(10B) CRNs: 12455 and 13645 and 13646
(10B) Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and TR 1:40-2:55, T 3:05-3:55 and T 5:05-5:55 PM

The purpose of this learning community is to explore how to conduct business in the hospitality industry. Special attention will be paid on how to communicate ideas and strategies effectively throughout both the industry and the community. This class will introduce students to the hospitality environment and guide them in developing professional skills through writing business correspondences such as memos, reports, resumès and cover letters as well as creative and analytical features focusing on industry issues. Students will explore Charleston and all its offerings to understand how the tourism industry works in one of the world’s premier destinations.

Feminist Jiu-Jitsu for Self-Defense (LC11)
FYSE 141: Studies in Women's and Gender Studies and PEAC 120: Women’s Self-Defense and FYSS 101
Kristi Brian and Margarete McGuigan and Pat McGuigan
Women and Gender Studies and Health and Human Performance
5 elective credits
CRNs: 13647 and 11695 and 13748
Course times: W 4:00-6:45 and TR 9:25-10:40 and T 3:05-3:55 PM

This learning community combines jiu-jitsu training for self-defense and an introduction to feminist empowerment. Each week students will have physical self-defense training on the mat and classroom engagement centered on feminist analysis of oppression, identity, power and the body. The course aims to achieve a holistic approach to an interactive dialogue. Students will be encouraged to document throughout the course how their own evolution towards greater empowerment is shaped by the jiu-jitsu practice and feminist teachings. The course is intended to be inclusive and suitable for all genders. Men, women, transgender, and gender non-conforming students will all be acknowledged for the situated knowledge they bring to the topic.

Psychology of Women’s Studies and Gender Issues (LC12 A-B)
PSYC 103: Intro to Psychological Science and WGST 200: Intro to Women's and Gender Studies and FYSS 101
Jennifer Wright and Lisa Ross
Psychology
3 social science and 3 humanities credits
(A) CRNs: 13649 and 12430 and 13650
(A) Course times: MW 3:25-4:40 and TR 8:00-9:15am and M 5:00-5:50 PM
(B) CRNs: 13651 and 12427 and 13652
(B) Course times: MW 3:25-4:40 and TR 8:00-9:15am and F 3:00-3:50 PM

Students in this learning community will explore the foundations of psychology, with an eye to how basic neurological and psychological processes (learning, memory, perception, social cognition) help us to understand various gender, race, class, and sexual orientation issues. We’ll also look closely at the development of gender and sexual orientation and the influence that biological, familial, and cultural factors have on developmental trajectories.  From the Women’s and Gender Studies side we will discuss historical and contemporary feminism, race, class, and sexual orientation, along with a variety of gender-related issues – e.g., eating disorders, sexual harassment, rape, pregnancy, and sexual reproduction, etc. Our discussions will continue to highlight the importance of various psychological processes for understanding these issues.

Society and the Individual (LC13)
SOCY 101: Intro to Sociology and ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Ann Stein and Anna Lonon
Sociology and English
3 social science and 4 English credits
CRNs: 13653 and 10412 and 13654
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and MWF 12:00-12:50, M 1:00-1:50 and R 8:05-8:55 AM

Have you ever wondered why people behave the way they do? Observe human behavior through the windows of Sociology and English for a better understanding of your world. Discover the insights that these disciplines offer about how society affects you and how you affect society. Both classes will look at this theme through provocative essays and other readings.

STEM-SCAMP (LC14)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L*: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and MATH 120: Introductory Calculus and MATH 120L: Introductory Calculus Lab and FYSS 101
Chris Korey and Sofia Agrest
Biology and Biology and Math
4 natural science and 4 math credits
CRNs: 13656 and 11792 and 11028 and 13749
Course times: MWF 3:00-3:50 and MWF 10:00-10:50, T 9:25-10:40 and MWF 1:00-1:50 and R 5:05-5:55 PM

Will the end of the human race come at the hands of a pandemic virus? How are scientists approaching the study of Avian Influenza, Ebola, and the Zika virus, The focal theme for this learning community, which connects Biology 111 (Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology) for Science Majors and Math 120  (Calculus), will be the world of viral biology--both the science of virology as well as how these two disciplines approach the study of viruses. Viral biology will be the theme of our discussion of basic cellular and molecular biology in our Biology class. A themed project across both classes will have students explore how epidemiologists model viral outbreaks using calculus. This course to open only to pre-selected students.
* Students must enroll in BIOL 111L separately for full enrollment in this Learning Community

Preparing the World for the Coming Apocalypse (LC15 A-B)
BIOL 111: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L*: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and HEAL 215: Introduction to Public Health and FYSS 101
Chris Korey and Brian Bossak
Biology and Health and Human Performance
4 natural science and 3 elective credits
(A) CRNs: 13658 and 12769 and 13662
(A) Course times: MWF 3:00-3:50 and TR 1:40-2:55 and M 4:00-4:50 PM
(B) CRNs: 13762 and 13763 and 13765
(B) Course times: MWF 3:00-3:50 and TR 1:40-2:55 and F 4:00-4:50 PM
As the world becomes more interconnected, the challenges associated with the identification, containment, and treatment of a variety of public health challenges continue to grow. This learning community will look at how Public Health and Biology are trying to address the rise of deadly pathogens and environmental health threats. In  BIOL 111 students will learn the basics of cell and molecular biology through the lens of emergent viral diseases, like avian influenza. Students in HEAL 215 will apply their knowledge of disease mechanisms to the understanding of their effect on human societies.
* Students must enroll in BIOL 111L separately for full enrollment in this Learning Community

Spanish Panorama: The Culture, Language, and Geography of Spain (LC17)
SPAN 202: Intermediate Spanish and FYSE 120: Global Perspectives: The Geography and the Cultures of Spain and FYSS 101
Devon Hanahan and Antonio Perez-Nunez
Hispanic Studies
3 foreign language credits and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 10476 and 13665 and 13667
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and TR 1:40-2:55 and T 8:05-8:55 AM

Students will take a Spanish 202 class that will parallel their culture course and will prepare them to learn and talk about Spain in the target language. In the culture course students will dive into Spanish culture, covering such topics as geography, history, cuisine, art, architecture, government, Spanish youth culture, feasts and festivals of Spain, unique cities in Spain, and travel abroad options. Throughout the semester the class will have various extracurricular activities such as dinner in the Spanish restaurant Barsa, movie nights, Tertulias, and a cooking contest. ¡Viva España!

Art, Sustainability, and Activism (LC18)
ARTS 220: Sculpture I and ARTS 119: Drawing I and FYSS 101
Joey Van Arnhem and Yvette Dede
Studio Art
6 elective credits
CRNs: 12169 and 10048 and 13669
Course times: W 6:00-9:45pm and R 1:40-5:25 and F 4:00-4:50 PM

This learning community will be a studio art collaboration between Sculpture I and Drawing I. The purpose of the learning community is to introduce the study of 2D and 3D forms and concepts as they apply to the realization of two dimensional and sculptural ideas in space and time. Form and content receive equal emphasis. Along with introducing 2D and 3D media and creation, this course will places emphasis on artistic process as a means to creating meaningful artwork. The course will emphasize conceptual reasoning and consideration of material choice, craft, form, space, site, presentation, and context as well as concepts of sustainability. It will provide a forum for the discussion and exploration of artistic practices and include discussions and art practice that address the topics of art, sustainability, and activism and how these issues can be investigated through the act of creating art and living a creative life. (Notethis learning community fulfills the drawing requirement for Sculpture I).

New Ways of Seeing: Producing Art in Contemporary Culture (LC19)
ARTS 220: Sculpture I and ARTS 119: Drawing I and FYSS 101
Jarod Charzewski and Steve Johnson
Studio Art
6 elective credits
CRNs: 13670 and 13671 and 13672
Course times: TR 9:25-1:10 and M 9:00-12:45 and M 8:00-8:50 AM

This learning community will be a studio art collaboration between Sculpture I and Drawing I. Its purpose is to introduce the study of 2D and 3D art production as they are created in contemporary society. The term “Contemporary” will be defined as happening right now. This means techniques, concepts, and subject matters covered in this class will be accompanied by current examples from the art world and our global culture. We will place emphasis on professional practice through lectures, gallery visits, and visiting artists. These will also function as our connections to the art world. Through critiques students will learn the empowerment of language and critical discourse as we discuss materials, skill, aspects of form, space and presentation.

Is it All in Your Head?: Wellness of Body and Mind (LC20)
ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSE 132: Healthy Minds and Healthy Bodies and FYSS 101
Mike Duvall and Lisa Ross
English and Psychology
4 English and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 13673 and 13674 and 13675
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55, R 3:05-3:55, MWF 9:00-9:50 and W 8:00-8:50 AM

What are the relations between body and mind, physiology and psychology? Armed with the knowledge of this complex interchange and feedback loop, we will ask what we can do to secure physical and mental wellness in ourselves and in our communities. In this learning community, we will examine how stress, wellness, and coping are influenced by physical activity and health-impacting choices, with particular attention to the relatively common symptoms of anxiety and depression. Through the study of rhetoric and writing, students will learn how to decode popular and academic discourse about physical and mental wellbeing in order to produce their own writing. Also, students will engage in wellness-focused community service, and will reflect on these experiences. Students in this LC will be armed with knowledge and writing and coping skills that will serve them well at the College and beyond.

Great Civilizations: Exploring Asia (LC21)
CHNS 101: Elementary Mandarin Chinese and CHNS 101C* and ASST 101 and FYSS 101
Lei Jin and Piotr Gibas
Asian Studies
4 foreign language credits and 3 humanities credits
CRNs: 10438 and 12703 and 13676
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and MWF 2:00-2:50 and F 8:00-8:50 AM

This course will explore Asian cultural, religious, economic, and political history of a thousand years, as well as the rapid changes in the process of globalization. The course is structured to allow students the opportunity to gain insightful knowledge of Asian culture and civilization through language learning. Linked with one of  the core courses of Asian Studies (ASST 101), this course will lay the foundation for students who are interested in exploring the increasingly important role Asia has played on the global stage through interdisciplinary studies such as International Studies, Business, Political Science, Religious Studies, and History.
*Students are required to take the conversation class but can sign up for any section

Language and Religion (LC22)
ARST 100: Introduction to Arab and Islamic World and ARBC 101: Elementary Arabic and ARBC 101D (online) and FYSS 101
Garrett Davidson and Ghazi Abuhakema
Asian Studies
3 humanities credits and 4 foreign language credits
CRNs: 11623 and 10435 and 14001 and 13684
Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and MWF 10:00-10:50 and R 5:05-5:55 PM

This course is an interdisciplinary survey of the most salient features of Arab and Islamic history, geography, society, law, theology, and culture, stretching from the birth of the Muslim community in the seventh century to the twenty-first century. Geographically it covers the entirety of the Muslim-majority world from Morocco to Malaysia, as well as diaspora Arab and Muslim communities in the United States and Europe. In tandem with the survey, students are introduced to the basics of  Arabic, the language of 350 million Arabs and the liturgical language of 1.8 billion Muslims. Once a basic knowledge of Arabic is acquired, some of the primary sources of the content side of the course will be presented in both their English translations and Arabic originals for comparison.

Sprechen Sie Business? German Business in South Carolina and Beyond (LC23)
GRMN 101: Elementary German and MGMT 105: Introduction to Business and FYSS 101
Stephen Della Lana and Eric Doesburg
German and Management and Marketing
3 foreign language credits and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 11531 and 13629 and 13685
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and M 5:30-8:15pm and R 6:05-6:55 PM

German business is a global phenomenon with a tremendous local economic impact on the US and especially in South Carolina —there are over 160 German companies based in SC alone and over 32,000 jobs from German industry in the state!  Our learning community will explore the lucrative connections and career opportunities at the intersection of Business and German. MGMT 105 provides an overview of Business fields, activities, and issues by exploring case studies from German industry in South Carolina, while German 101 will introduce students to the German language with an emphasis on business communication and etiquette.

First-Year Seminars:


The Gullah Community: Ethnographic Research in Memory and Identity
FYSE 102 and FYSS 101
Ade Ofunniyin
Africa American Studies
CRNs: 13529 and 13530
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and FYSS time W 6:00-6:50 PM

This course proposes to introduce first-year students to the Gullah Geechee community, it's cultural and historical significance in the context of ethnographic research and methodology, through a social justice and identity studies lens. Our focus will be on African and African descended peoples narratives, especially those that centralize multi-ethnic/regional identity and a desire to reconcile identity by returning to their "roots" or homelands, or by evoking ancestral narratives. The class will read Barracoon: The Story of the Last Black Cargo by Zora Neale Hurston. Students will also read from a prepared course reader. We will take several local class trips to significant historical sites or places of interest and will engage the Social Justice initiatives taking place on and around CofC campus.

Photography, History, and Memories
FYSE 105 and FYSS 101
Mary Trent
Art History
CRNs: 13533 and 13534
Course Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and F 12:00-12:50 PM

Since they were invented in 1839, photographs have been used to capture moments in time and preserve memories.  This course will look at examples of photographs from the 19th century to today to study the many ways people have used photographs to capture and construct personal and collective recollections. Assignments will ask students to understand scholarly writing and vocabulary addressing the history of photography and to develop and support independent arguments about how photographs help us narrate our individual and shared memories and myths. NOTE: This class focuses on the history of photography and we will not be taking photographs.

Exploring the Arts and Cultural Ecosystem of the Lowcountry
FYSE 106 and FYSS 101
Claire Long
Arts Management
CRNs: 13535 and 13536
Course Times: W 5:30-8:15 PM and T 4:05-4:55 PM

This course will serve as an introduction to the vibrant arts community in the Lowcountry. Through a series of immersive experiences across a variety of creative disciplines, including performing, visual, literary, and media arts, students will learn hands-on professional and social skills, as well as critical thinking. This course, which models the interdisciplinarity of the field of Arts Management, teaches transferability of knowledge across industries–a skill that benefits both future arts managers and other professionals alike. Upon completion of the course, students will have obtained practical professional experience in conjunction with a more complete awareness of arts and cultural resources and offerings in the Lowcountry, making them well-rounded students and active members of the community.

World Music East and West
FYSE 107 and FYSS 101
Ghassan Nasr
Asian Studies
CRNs: 13537 and 13538
Course Times: MW 2:00-3:15 and T 8:05-8:55 AM

In this course we will sample Arab popular songs and musicians from a variety of musical genres and styles, with emphasis on the modern, cosmopolitan, mass-mediated song from its early 20th century beginnings in Egypt. We will approach Arab popular culture as a site that blends local traditions and aesthetics with global musical and cultural influences. The regions covered range from North Africa, to Egypt and East Africa, and farther east to the Levant (Lebanon, Palestine, Israel, Syria, Jordan, Iraq) and the Arabian Gulf. Larger themes will be discussed in context, and some musical concepts will be covered in non-technical ways. Song lyrics will be provided in English translation where necessary. Knowledge of Arabic is not required.

Chinese Culture Through Cinema: Kung Fu and Culture Conflict
FYSE 107 and FYSS 101
Lei Jin
Asian Studies
CRNs: 13717 and 13718
Course Times: MW 2:00-4:00* and R 4:05-4:55 PM

What do we see in the dreams of Chinese youth, past and present, and in city and countryside? How are their dreams and lives shaped and impacted by traditional cultural values and a rapidly changing society? Focusing on the cinematic presentations of the lives of youth, this course will first introduce to the students the Chinese traditions and values in which the martial arts movies are deep rooted. Switching from the imagined world to reality, the course will explore the social, cultural, and environmental impacts brought about by the dramatic changes of the past three decades in China. In addition, the students will gain a better understanding of the cultural conflicts faced by young Chinese immigrants and American travelers as they seek to live and learn American or Chinese society, respectively.
*Extra time has been scheduled for film screenings.

Biomimicry: Nature as Mentor
FYSE 108 and FYSS 101
Deb Bidwell
Biology
CRNs: 13539 and 13540
Course times: MWF 2:00-2:50 and F 9:00-9:50 AM

What can nature teach humans about fitting in on earth?  When and why did humans become isolated from the natural world?  Nature constructs, transports, communicates, and transacts business, yet balances form and function with elegant efficiency.  It self assembles, wastes nearly nothing, recycles everything, and produces no pollution.  How can modern human civilization (re)learn to live sustainably with the other 30 million species sharing our planet, yet keep our modern lifestyle? Biomimicry is the exciting, emerging, interdisciplinary field that looks to nature as a mentor to design sustainable solutions to human problems.  With over 3.8 billion years of experience, the natural world has already solved the same challenges humans are facing today! In this inspiring, hands-on First Year Seminar we’ll explore biomimicry, and prepare students to take on leadership roles in the sustainability movement.

Beyond the Grave: What Old Cemeteries Tell and Teach the Living  
FYSE 111 and FYSS 101
Patrick Harwood
Communication
CRNs: 13541 and 13542
Course times: M 6:00-8:45pm and M 9:00-9:50 AM

The College of Charleston is surrounded by Charleston’s historic streets, buildings, and cemeteries.  This seminar will focus on the many 18th and 19th century graveyards within walking distance of campus. We will use multiple disciplinary perspectives to study lives lost long ago and what how they were buried, memorialized, and remembered can tell us about our lives and lifestyles today. The instructor of this has authored two books about Magnolia Cemetery, a beautiful and historic 19th century Victorian cemetery located on the outskirts of Charleston.

The Pursuit of Happiness
FYSE 112 and FYSS 101
Yulia Kahl
Computer Science
CRNs:13543 and 13544
Course times: TR 8:30-9:45 and W 12:00-12:50 PM

Some try to achieve happiness, while others question its existence beyond a kind of contentment or temporary joy. In this course, we will explore various prescriptions for attaining happiness and their relation to a moral code, a sense of purpose, and the freedom to make one's own choices. We'll learn from a philosopher, an emperor, a prophet, a poet, a self-made man, a refugee, an architect, a computer scientist, and a science fiction writer. Expect to read and write about the thoughts of Socrates, Marcus Aurelius, Benjamin Franklin, Jane Austen, Norton Juster, and Ray Bradbury. We will also listen to contemporary speakers such as Judea Pearl and Hyeonseo Lee. 

Economics of Globalization
FYSE 113 and FYSS 101
Beatriz Maldonado-Bird
International Studies/Economics
CRNs: 13546 and 13547
Course times: MWF 9:00-9:50 and F 5:00-5:50 PM

This course introduces topics surrounding economic globalization. It examines the historic and current economic causes and consequences of global integration. Topics include history of globalization, the role of international trade, post-WWII global monetary system and financial integration. It evaluates the arguments on both sides of the globalization debate as well as globalization's effects on domestic economies and policies, labor markets, production, and on the environment (among other topics).

Banned Books
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Marjory Wentworth
English
CRNs: 13548 and 13549
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and M 12:00-12:50 PM

This course examines a variety of texts that have been banned across several centuries  and continents. Texts have been seized or outlawed, classified as taboo, their authors fined, jailed, tortured, exiled and killed throughout history under many different political regimes. The focus is literature from the past two centuries, spanning diverse cultural and political contexts, as well as some films now considered “classics.” In America, many writers of our most beloved books have experienced the sting of censorship and distorted judgement aimed at their work. Recent contempt for the news media will be examined within its unique role in our democracy. We will also incorporate contemporary First Amendment issues–especially in terms of the internet (social media).

Harry Potter and the Human Condition
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Trish Ward
English
CRNs: 13550 and 13551
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and M 3:00-3:50 PM

J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series develops themes of love, death, power, innocence, prejudice, appearance/reality, and what it means to be human.  In this seminar we will read and discuss all seven books in the series with special attention to these themes and the ways in which they are developed. Students enrolled in the course are strongly advised to begin reading the books before the course begins.

Authoring Addiction: Literary and Cultural Narratives of Drugs and Alcohol Abuse
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Allan Borst
English
CRNs: 13553 and 13554
Course times: MWF 9:00-9:50 and T 6:00-6:50 PM

Addiction has been many things during the last couple of centuries–a moral failing, a deficiency of willpower, a disease, a genetic defect, a neurochemical disorder–but in that time it has always been a story. While numerous theories and beliefs about drug addiction and alcoholism have come and gone, addiction narratives have remained remarkably consistent in their form and function. This seminar considers how first-person experience-based accounts of drug and alcohol abuse have proved so common and so vital to our understanding of addiction. In addition to studying their literary and cultural significance, we’ll consider the political importance of listening to and engaging with addicts’ own stories in an era shaped by self-help, big pharma, and U.S. drug policy.

The Wonderful World of Real Estate According to King Street
FYSE 115 and FYSS 101
Elaine Worzala
Finance
CRNs: 13555 and 13557
Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and R 8:05-8:55 AM

This course will introduce students to the multi-faceted nature of the real estate industry. King Street will be our case study. We will explore office, retail/restaurant, industrial, residential, hospitality, and public spaces. An incredible laboratory, students will go out in the field to experience the marketplace and we will bring professionals into the classroom. Students will be able to see first-hand the variety of real estate that is located in an urban environment and the professionals will expose students to the many different career paths that are intimately involved with this discipline including business, law, historic preservation, public policy, politics, urban studies, environmental sciences, and arts management.

Heavy Metals and Wall Street
FYSE 115 and FYSS 101
Denise Fugo
Finance
CRNs: 13558 and 13559
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and T 5:05-5:55 PM

Wall Street generates tremendous fees off of capital projects and a $1 billion infrastructure spend is in the nation’s budget.  What are the best practices for planning for world class water treatment facilities, customer usage, pricing and financing? What are the rates of return? Flint, Michigan's lead laced water now costs each household approximately $250 per month; much more than your Verizon bill.  Puerto Rico has filed for bankruptcy as their refinancing of all their municipal authorities was great for Wall Street, but not for the citizens or government of Puerto Rico. Unfortunately, there are over 6000 municipalities in the United States whose water quality is below the Environmental Protection Agencies minimum cleanliness limits.  We will travel the globe as we study the oceans, lakes and rivers - precious natural resources which are heading for corporate control.  Just as family farms have disappeared, global corporate conglomerates are already in the water business.  As of 2016, 783 million people do not have access to clean and safe water worldwide.  Leaders are needed.

Ghost Stories
FYSE 116 and FYSS 101
Robert Sapp
French, Francophone and Italian Studies
CRNs: 13560 and 13561
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and W 4:00-4:50 PM

This course turns a critical eye on the familiar figure of the ghost. We will explore, through a variety of media (traditional ghost stories, ghost tours, “eyewitness” encounters, cultural and religious practices with regard to the dead, and representations of ghost in literature and film) the figure of the ghost in an attempt to uncover a poetics of haunting, that is, the unspoken rules that allow for something like the notion of a ghost to exist. Ultimately we will consider what the figure of the ghost and the notion of haunting reveals about humans and our relationship with death.

Global Perspectives: ¡Barcelona!
SPAN 202 and FYSS 101
Emily Beck
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: 10471 and 13562
Course times: MWF 9:00-9:50 and W 5:00-5:50 PM

This course fulfills the requirements for SPAN 202 and covers the required departmental curriculum with an additional focus on the history, culture, and dynamic experience of the city of Barcelona through supplementary readings, artistic works, film, and new media. Barcelona has long attracted tourists for its amazing architecture, delectable gastronomy, unique cultural history, distinctive urban layout, the variety of artists who have been inspired by the city and its lively social scene. This course is structured to allow students the opportunity to discuss, review vocabulary, and practice grammar activities related to the famous metropolis of Barcelona. Students will create presentations involving writing and speaking skills to share their research about diverse aspects of the city with the class. Students must test into SPAN 202 in order to enroll in this course.

Working Lives
FYSE 120 and FYSS 101
Susan Divine
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: 13565 and 13566
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and T 5:05-5:55 PM

This class will look at two very big question: what is “work” and how does it add meaning to our lives? With mounting pressures on colleges and universities to produce future “employees” rather than “scholars,” coupled with a global discourse on high levels of unemployment, fear over immigration, as well as ongoing conversations about closing the wage gap and raising the minimum wage, this course will engage cross-cultural notions of labor. We will look at how work constructs our identity at multiple levels. Each narrative or film studied will allow for a discussion of specific aspects of work as it relates to history, structures of power, politics, the urban, gender, and trauma. We will look at how emperors, holocaust survivors, anarchists, immigrants, and how those in the class view individual identity as it relates to work.

The Weird, the Frightening, and the Future: Pop Culture and Identity in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (sections A-B)
FYSE 121 and FYSS 101
Rich Bodek
History
(A) CRNs: 13567 and 13569
(A) Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and M 3:00-3:50 PM
(B) CRNs: 13726 and 13727
(B) Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and W 3:00-3:50 PM

Weird Tales, Horror, and Science Fiction were three of the most popular literary genres in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to construct ideas of what Americans and Europeans should be, do, and think. We are going to read classic and not-so-classic examples of each to encounter ideas about honor, gender, violence, science, race, and more. We will see how ideas shift and change over time, and, indeed, how often conflicting ideas can be at work in the same story. If you sign up for this course, be prepared to enter moldering castles, hear things that go bump in the night, and explore the stars.

History in the News
FYSE 121 and FYSS 101
Adam Domby
History
CRNs: 13571 and 13572
Course times: TR 3:05-4:20 and M 5:00-5:50 PM

This course studies the historical background of current day controversies in the news. Topics may include Confederate monuments, conflict in the Middle East, DAPL and Native American land rights, the history of election interference, and of sports and protest. The subjects will change depending on the ongoing news stories. Students will learn how we got the problems we are stuck with today and hopefully gain insight into how to solve them.

Paris: A History of the City of Light
FYSE 121 and FYSS 101
Bill Olejniczak
History
CRNs: 13573 and 13574
Course Times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and R 6:05-6:55 PM

How were Notre Dame and Versailles Palace built? Who conversed at the Café Procope and Cafe Flore? Why did millions visit the Exposition of 1889? What is the "Left Bank?" How did Parisians experience the world wars? This course answers these questions and more as we explore the deep history of Paris from antiquity to the present with a focus on how it became the "capital of modernity," an epicenter of revolution in politics, art, and boulevard life and an international magnet for culture.  Students will learn the skills of the historian through analysis of primary accounts, novels, films, and web-sites. As a special feature, each student will develop an expertise on a Parisian neighborhood.

What is a Nation?
FYSE 124 and FYSS 101
Joshua Shanes
Jewish Studies
CRNs: 13575 and 13576
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and M 6:00-6:50 PM

Nations today seem to be a self-evident reality. The nation is the core unit of political legitimacy for a sovereign state, while the “United Nations” is the platform for global humanity’s cooperation. Yet nations are neither ancient nor self-evident bodies; they are modern constructions, no more than a couple centuries old (often much younger), that compete with other forms of community for legitimacy and loyalty. Even the basic question, “what is a nation,” brings no uniform answer. Nation-states and nationalism can bond communities and stabilize states and regions, but they are also sources of violent conflict and have facilitated some of the most barbaric acts on human history. This seminar will explore the origins and development of nations and nationalism, beginning with France (and America) in the 18th century, moving through Germany to Eastern Europe in the 19th, and then spreading throughout the world in the 20th. Throughout, we’ll compare various versions of the national idea and consider what all of this means for us today, as Americans at the start of the 21st century. We will raise basic questions about identity, community (membership and boundaries), ethnicity, and the human condition.

Party Like It’s 1899
FYSE 124 and FYSS 101
Shari Rabin
Jewish Studies
CRNs: 13577 and 13578
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and W 3:00-3:50 PM

Between 1800 and 1899 the new American nation grew, diversified, and transformed economically and politically. This led to a range of new practices and arrangements related to gender, religion, and commerce. This course will explore nineteenth-century histories of sex, drugs and alcohol, and “rock ‘n roll” – festivities and spectacles – in order to understand the cultural politics of America’s first full century. Doing so will raise questions about what was “normal and “American” in the nineteenth century and shed light on those questions in the present day.

Children and the Holocaust
FYSE 124 and FYSS 101
Ted Rosengarten
Jewish Studies
CRNs: 13579 and 13580
Course times: MW 4:00-5:15 and W 6:00-6:50 PM

Why did Nazi Germany target Jewish children with such special ferocity?  A small number escaped or were rescued and lived to write their recollections which are just now surfacing. The ordeal of non-Jewish children in war-time Europe—German, Polish, Ukrainian—a story long buried in silence, is also finding a voice in film and literature today.  This seminar will investigate the experiences of all children who were swept up in the “Final Solution” and ask questions they might have asked about the world that produced the catastrophe whose meaning eludes us still.


Human Rights in Latin America
FYSE 125 and FYSS 101
Edward Chauca
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
CRNs: 13581 and 13582
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and M 4:00-4:50 PM

The transitions to democracy often do not deliver on long expected justice and reparations for the victims of dictatorships, thus the struggles for and advocacy of human rights became one of the key concerns for governments, NGOs, victims associations, writers, filmmakers, artists, and scholars. The second part of the twentieth century in Latin America was marked by an increase in military dictatorships, state terrorism, and armed conflicts that left thousands of deaths, forced disappearances, and victims of torture and abuse. Our course will focus on the cases of Argentina and Peru and examines how cinema, literature, and medical anthropology have approached debates on human rights, legal and political impunity, demands for collective and individual reparations, and the unequal burden of trauma between genders.

Social and Environmental Justice through Film
FYSE 125 and FYSS 101
Vicki Garrett
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
CRNs: 13583 and 13584
Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and R 6:05-6:55 PM

This class examines Latin American perspectives on the economic and environmental dimensions of global sustainability through film and literature. We will consider how non-Western narratives challenge and bring into question many underlying cultural assumptions present in our Western narratives about sustainability. This creates the opportunity for us to shift our Western narratives in a way that promotes global environmental and social justice. Through the exploration of non-Western narratives, students will be able to identify and evaluate the connections between global capitalism, slow violence, and transnational consumerism. This class will also consider case studies from throughout the Americas where socially and environmentally sustainable alternatives to extractive, exploitative capitalism are already functioning -- such as sustainable garment work or farming collectives.

The Beautiful and the Good: Art, Ethics, and Culture in Japan
FYSE 129 and FYSS 101
Laura Specker Sullivan
Philosophy
CRNs: 13585 and 13586
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and T 3:05-3:55 PM

This seminar considers the relationship between art, ethics, and culture through philosophy, literature, and visual art in Japan. We will read philosophical texts, examine the philosophical dimensions of literature, and practice taking diverse philosophical stances on works of art. In the process, we will reflect on assumptions about art in society and we will creatively explore the role of art in developing and sustaining moral attitudes and practices. This class includes reading and discussion, as well as experiential components such as museum and gallery visits.

The US and Globalization
FYSE 131 and FYSS 101
Guoli Liu
Political Science
CRNs: 13587 and 13588
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and M 6:00-6:50 PM

The course examines U.S. foreign policy in a globalizing world. We will study the past, present, and future of American foreign policy. Globalization refers to the integration of the world’s communications, culture, economics, and norms, thereby creating a much more interdependent world. We will explore the impacts of globalization on jobs, economic inequality, environment, state sovereignty, global security, and world culture, before asking what possible alternatives to globalization exist. What are the dynamics of globalization? What are the benefits and costs of globalization? What is the relationship between theory and practice? Students will gain a better understanding of the changing role of the United States in the era of globalization.

Evolution for Everyone
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Stephen Short
Psychology
CRNs: 13589 and 13590
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and W 9:00-9:50 AM

Now over 150 years old, Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species and his accompanying theory of evolution still face substantial criticism and denial from individuals across the western world, but in particular the United States. In this course, we will begin by reviewing the scientific method, the theory of evolution, and natural selection. Next, we will explore how evolutionary theory can be applied across a variety of fields with examples from areas such as economics, medicine, anthropology, and psychology. We will also explore opposition to evolution and the potential costs of dismissing this powerful framework. Finally, students will use their new evolutionary perspective to explore topics of their own interest and share their findings with their peers.

Emerging Adulthood: The Age of Possibilities
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Amy Kolak
Psychology
CRNs: 13591 and 13592
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and R 4:05-4:55 PM

In this course, we will review research, theory, and practice related to Emerging Adulthood (a relatively new term that is being applied to individuals between 19 and 29 in primarily industrialized countries). The variety of factors, including social, economic, and psychological, that are related to the emergence of this new developmental period, along with its impact on society, will be discussed. Research on the various domains (i.e. school, work, love, family, and identity) of emerging adults’ lives will be examined. Finally, we will explore individual behaviors and contexts that may be associated with the successful navigation of this period.

You Are What You Wear: Just Fashion
FYSE 134 and FYSS 101
Louise Doire
Religious Studies
CRNs: 13593 and 13594
Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and R 4:05-4:55 PM

In this course, we will study the history of clothing making and the just and unjust practices of global clothing manufacturing. We will examine the movements for sustainable production of cloth, organic fiber gardening, the use of natural dyes, and the history of cotton and indigo farming in the South, including Charleston. Other topics include the movement of “slow fashion,” and the history of subversive embroidery. We will also study religious ritual garments, the Muslim hijab and Gandhi’s practice of cotton spinning.

Sociology of Food
FYSE 135 and FYSS 101
Idee Winfield
Sociology
CRNs: 13595 and 13596
Course times: TR 3:05-4:20 and W 6:00-6:50 PM

Biology may dictate that we eat, but what and how we eat depends upon wider cultural values and social practices. This course puts food into its social contexts. We examine how what we eat and the way we eat it expresses our social identities and tells other where we fit in the social order. We explore how the system for producing and marketing food affects not only what (and how much) we eat, but creates issues of food justice in the larger society. We also examine how food is both an object of politics and a basis for social movements.

American Popular Culture (sections A-B)
FYSE 135 and FYSS 101
Paul Roof
Sociology
(A) CRNs: 13597 and 13598
(A) Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and T 6:05-6:55 PM
(B) CRNs: 13599 and 13600
(B) Course times: MW 3:25-4:30 and T 8:05-8:55 AM

This course is designed to introduce students to critical analysis of contemporary popular culture in the United States.  Students will get an overview of the insights, findings, concepts, and perspectives that are held by a wide variety of interdisciplinary popular culture scholars today.  Several prominent areas of popular culture to be studied include: advertising, television, film, music, religion, and cyberculture

Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: More Than Just a Movie
FYSE 136 and FYSS 101
Kent Gourdin
Supply Chain and Information Management
CRNs: 13601 and 13602
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and T 3:05-3:55 PM

Most consumers have little concern for how the products they purchase reach stores. Despite the fact that these come from all over the world, most of us only notice those instances when what we want is not available. We know we live in a port city, perhaps notice a big ship when it is in the harbor, or curse all of the trucks moving containers on our roadways, but we never give a thought to what they represent. This course will introduce students to the fascinating areas of global transportation, logistics, and supply chain management which work together to get us the products we want, when we want them, at a price we are willing to pay.

Learn it, Live it, Give it: Mentoring and Youth Development
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Margaret Hagood
Teacher Education
CRNs: 13603 and 13604
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and M 3:00-3:50 PM

Who are the mentors in your life? How did they shape who you are? Might you have an interest in mentoring others? This course examines mentor/mentee relationships, identifies factors that enhance outcomes for mentors and mentees, and various mentoring contexts. It builds a multilevel mentoring framework drawing on successful mentoring in athletic, educational, and business contexts. Participants will learn components of effective mentoring, including activities, interventions, reflective listening, and growth mindset while attending to the youth development process. It addresses cultural, gender and economic issues in mentor relationships and challenges associated with mentoring. It also explores and provides local mentoring opportunities.

Teaching Fellows
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Mary Ann M. Hartshorn
Teacher Education
CRNs: 13607 and 13608
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and W 3:00-3:50 PM

This course is specifically designed for freshmen Teaching Fellows. These students have chosen education as their major and profession in return from the State of South Carolina. This course is the first in a series of learning experiences for students who will teach in South Carolina schools after graduation. Part of the Teaching Fellows Program and the Teacher Education Program offered by the School of Education, Health, and Human Performance, this course is designed to help students adjust to college life and excel as future educators. This course to open only to pre-selected Teaching Fellows.

Exploring Cultural Strengths and Diversity through Storytelling
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Renard Harris
Teacher Education
CRNs: 13609 and 13610
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and W 4:00-4:50 PM

Whether real or imagined, stories make us who we are. Stories inform us of our past, support out present, and shape our futures. Culture, or “ways of being”, influence the way we share and interpret stories, and our cultural differences gives each of us a lens to see and understand the world around us. The way an individual speaks, carries him/herself, responds to the mundane and reacts to the unfamiliar is founded in the stories of that individual’s cultural strengths. These cultural strengths can be used to navigate oneself through social and academic spaces. This course is about the art of storytelling to express one’s cultural strengths and the opportunity to share in a diverse community.

Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Susan Flynn
Teacher Education
CRNs: 13612 and 13613
Course times: W 3:00-6:00 and T 4:05-4:55 PM

Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics course is designed to provide students interested in pursuing a degree in occupational and physical therapy as well as teacher education, with the knowledge and skills to design and implement movement experiences to enhance children's physical, social and emotional development. Students will participate in an aquatic and motor clinic putting theory to practice teaching young children in a therapy setting. Students will be required to go to an off-site facility during scheduled class times for 7 of the semester class sessions.  Students will need at least 45 minutes of travel time before 3:00 p.m.

Math in Motion: Teaching and Learning Math Through Movement, Walking, and Sight-Seeing
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Nenad Radakovic
Teacher Education
CRNs: 13614 and 13615
Course times: MW 11:00-12:15 and M 8:00-8:50 AM

How do we learn to love math? This course is designed for students of all math levels and will explore how to learn and teach math, by connecting math to the real world. Students will investigate how to use movement to learn and teach mathematics. Activities include: investigating shapes through walking, using movement to explore functions, and clapping to study periodic functions. Love exploring? We will also take various Math Trails around downtown Charleston and campus, including museums and galleries. A Math Trail is a walk through the community that involves questions about the mathematical features of objects (buildings, parks, etc.) on the trail. Students will then design their very own Math Trail choosing their favorite part of the city.

Revolutionary Poets Society: Slam poetry, spoken word, and adolescent life
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
W. Ian O’Byrne
Teacher Education
CRNs: 13618 and 13621
Course times: MW 12:30-1:15 and W 8:00-8:50 AM

The Revolutionary Poets Society focuses on global opportunities to respond to the demands of the moment through poetry, music and art. Here you will learn about the roots of slam poetry – the Harlem Renaissance, Confessional & Beat poetry, the Black Arts Movement, performance art, and hip-hop. You will develop a vocabulary and a set of critical, literacy, and performance approaches that will enable you to engage with slam poems and spoken-word poems on their own aesthetic terms. This course will include the development and sharing of your work and content openly online. You will be required to present your work and poetry openly online and in other public spaces throughout the semester. 

Behind the Curtain: Exploring the World of Live Theatre
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Glenda Byars
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 13622 and 13623
Course times: MWF 12:00-12:50 and T 3:05-3:55 PM

This is a survey course designed to introduce the student to many aspects of the live theatre experience and practice. This includes dramatic literature, playwriting, “show business”, acting and directing, design elements and techniques, and critical evaluation of plays and specific productions. The objective is to increase the students’ understanding and appreciation of the role of theatre in society and as an art form through live theatre attendance, active participation, lecture and reading.

Gender and Sexuality on Stage and Screen
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Jesse Portillo
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 13624 and 13625
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and W 5:00-5:50 PM

This course will use film and theatre to study the performance and presentation of gender and sexuality in the United States from the 20th century to the present. We will investigate how film and theater challenge and reflect societal attitudes towards gender, gender identity, and sexuality in a changing political landscape. Drawing from major works of film, plays, musical theatre and documentaries, the class will critically analyze content and context while expanding our understanding of the mediums.

Hooked: Fish, Fisheries, and Food for the Future
FYSE 142 and FYSS 101
Nick Principe
Environmental Studies
CRNs: 13626 and 13627
Course times: TR 8:00-9:15am and F 3:00-3:50 PM

Fishes are the most diverse vertebrates on earth, with over 28,000 recognized species; that is more species than all other vertebrates combined. Furthermore, many of our culturally and economically-vital global fisheries are currently at or near a state of collapse. In this course, students will examine the consequences of exploitation and mismanagement of fish populations around the world, from the Antarctic Circle, to the Mediterranean, to Nova Scotia. Students will explore how certain current and historical fisheries practices have led to the collapse of some fish populations and local economies and how these practices can and are being improved to become more sustainable.