CofC Logo

Spring 2010

LEARNING COMMUNITIES

LC1
lc1 spring 2010Chemistry 111/English 102
Jim Deavor/Marie Fitzwilliam
 
Thinking and Writing for Success in Science
This Learning Community, intended for Chemistry, Biology, and pre-med students, will explore ethical issues key to scientific discovery while also honing the writing skills that are essential to documenting your discoveries. You'll learn about the conventions of writing in the sciences and how they differ from writing in English, and support your Chemistry 111 material with essays in English 102 on hot-button issues like global warming. Besides written assignments and exams, you'll also present your findings in oral, group presentations. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the English component and one in the science component of the College's general education requirements.

LC2
Math 111/Physics 101
Sofia Agrest/Sorinel Oprisan
Connecting Physics and Mathematics 

This learning community is intended for freshmen majoring in biology/marine biology, chemistry/biochemistry, physics/biophysics, actuarial studies, or mathematics. We will emphasize the inherent links between our disciplines through writing assignments, an interdisciplinary laboratory, supplemental instruction, peer facilitation, and social activities. Collaborative written and laboratory assignments will focus on quantitative data collection and physical and mathematical reasoning. Group discussions and activities in combination with individual written assignments will help students to evaluate material thoroughly and on a personal level. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the math component and one course in the science component of the College's general education requirements.

LC3
English 102/Political Science 103 
Simon Lewis/Kea Gorden 
World Politics: Explorations Through South African Literature

Frederic Jameson once said that "all literature is in the last analysis political." Nowhere is this more obvious than in South Africa, where the policies of apartheid, racism's last word, ruled for nearly half a century. This Learning Community will cover materials for World Politics 103 and an English 102 class that will deal with literature and composition through multiple genres of South African works.  With South Africa as a case study, we will explore global political concerns over armed conflict, economics, political organization, race, class, and gender.  The course will enter into the subjective experience of political oppression, struggle and emancipation through intertwining the discourses of politics and literature. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the English component and one course in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

LC4
Art History 103/History 104
Mary Beth Heston/Jeffrey Diamond
Imagining Asia 

How has Asia been represented, in monuments, images and texts, in both the ancient and modern worlds? How did the diverse cultural regions that comprise Asia, from India and Afghanistan to Indonesia and Japan, construct their own identities, and how were those cultures understood in the West? Using literature, art, architecture, and films to examine the visual culture, the built environment and textual remains of Asian societies from a global perspective, you will learn how scholars, like the explorers of earlier ages, construct histories of the world’s cultures. These linked courses connect the ancient and the modern worlds, and thus will demonstrate the ways in which the present is shaped by the past. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements and one course in the history component for those students who took HIST 103 in the fall.

 

FIRST-YEAR SEMINARS

FYSM113-001 
The Individual, Family and State in the Western Tradition 
Darryl Phillips - Classics

For centuries humans have struggled to define themselves and to define the relationship between themselves, their families, and the state. This seminar will explore these themes in Greek and Roman culture through reading central works of the western tradition including Homer’s Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid.  Class discussions and student research projects will examine the appropriate roles of individuals, families, and the state. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM134-001 
Opportunities and Challenges in Medicine and Allied Health
Michelle Futrell - Health and Human Performance

This course will introduce students to professional opportunities within the medical and allied health fields, and expose students to basic terminology, psychomotor skills, and current issues and challenges facing health-care professionals.  Students will ascertain professional attitudes and attributes of medical and allied health professionals through one on one observation and interaction. Completion of this FYSM fulfills three hours of elective credit.

FYSM138-001
The European Witch-Hunts 
Jason Coy - History

In this seminar, we will examine the witch-hunts that swept early modern Europe, analyzing the intersection of power, religiosity, and magical beliefs that fueled the trials.  At least 50,000 people were executed for witchcraft during this period, usually after confessing under torture.  In our class meetings, we will discuss provocative scholarly interpretations of this phenomenon alongside historical documents from the period, including demonological tracts, chronicles written during the witch-hunts, and actual trial records and confessions.  Through our discussions of these fascinating texts, we will examine the origins of the witch-hunts, the social and cultural forces that sustained them, and the legacy of this violent episode in contemporary culture. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM156-001 
Starting Over: Using Post-apocalyptic Novels to Rethink the Social Contract
Claire Curtis - Political Science

Imagine if a nuclear bomb destroyed life as we know it.  How might survivors regroup and rebuild human society?  This class will use novels about the end of the world to think about the social contract – the mechanism whereby we bring a system of government into being. In addition to short papers students will work on a longer project, applying the social contract theory to a post-apocalyptic short story from theWastelands collection. Class will be structured around discussion of these two kinds of texts and their relevance to students' own perception about the motivations of humans. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM158-001
The Psychology of Violence
Jen Wright - Psychology

This course will discuss the physiological, psychological, cultural/ideological, and situational factors that contribute to human aggression and violence against other humans. We will discuss different types of aggression (e.g., physical, emotional, psychological), as well as different contexts in which it occurs – from playground bullying to culturally sanctioned aggression (e.g. boxing) to political revolution, war and genocide. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.