CofC Logo

Fall 2009

LEARNING COMMUNITIES

LC1 
Math 111/Biology 111/English 101 
Sofia Agrest/Caroline Hunt/Deb Bidwell
Connecting Science and Math Through Active Learning 
Designed for entering freshmen considering majors in biology/marine biology, chemistry/biochemistry, actuarial studies, or mathematics.  The learning community will help students transition to college through active learning, problem-solving, supplemental instruction, peer facilitation, and social activities. To emphasize the inherent links between these disciplines we will focus on research skills, utilize writing assignments and conduct an interdisciplinary laboratory. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the English component, one in the science component, and one course in the math component of the College's general education requirements.

LC2 
Classics 104/Anthropology 202
Jim Newhard/Maureen Hays
Archaeology: Where the Present Meets the Past
How do real archaeologists go about reconstructing past societies?  What are the tools of their trade, and how do they use them?  How do they go about combining data from different sources to paint a picture of the past? This learning community will answer these questions and many others. ANTH 202 (Introduction to Archaeology) covers methodological techniques while introducing you to prehistoric cultures.  CLAS 104 (Introduction to Classical Archaeology) investigates the history, traditions, and methods behind classical archaeology, delving into why and how the remains of these cultures continue to captivate western society. Completion of this community fulfills two of the three core course requirements for the archaeology minor, as well as one course each in the humanities and social science components of the College's general education requirements.

LC3
Classics 102/Latin 101
Noelle Carmichael/Brian Lush
Exploring Ancient Rome
An introduction to the daily lives, literature, history and language of the Romans. Classics 102 explores Roman religion, entertainment, politics, family life. Latin 101 introduces the basics of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary while translating adapted and original Latin passages that complement many of the civilization topics and authors read in Classics 102. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the humanities component and one in the foreign language component of the College's general education requirements.

LC4 
English 101/Psychology 103
Marguerite Scott-Copses/Adam Doughty
Left or “Write” Brained? 
Left or “Write” Brained? will link first-year composition exercises with key topics covered in Psych 103—the brain, sensation and perception, memory, learning, psychological disorders, and therapy. In Engl 101, students will read a series of essays, excerpts and short stories addressing these themes. Professors will connect the two disciplines, particularly as written assignments are concerned. Students will generate a series of in-class writings as well as polished papers fusing research from psychology with the context provided by English class readings. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the English component and one in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

LC5 
First-Year Seminar 158-001/Mathematics 104
David Gentry/Hope Florence
To Know a Freshman
The transition year into college can be challenging. Many factors will influence quality of life and learning experiences for entering freshmen. The students in this Learning Community will conduct research into the lives of their fellow freshmen to explore this transition. The FYSM 158 course will be a practical experience with survey research methodology and MATH 104 will cover basic statistical techniques that we will use to interpret data. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the social science component and one in the math component of the College's general education requirements.

LC6 
Biology 111/Psychology 103
Deb Bidwell/Mark Hurd
Biology and Psychology for Pre-Professional Students
This Learning Community is aimed at entering freshmen with a strong desire to become health professionals. These courses will demonstrate and reinforce the inherent, extensive connections between psychology and biology. Psychology 103 will introduce students to the science of behavior with special emphasis on the biological bases of behavior (neuroscience) and psychological disorders. Biology 111 focuses on molecular and cellular biology, including neurobiology highlighting the biochemical processes that define living systems. Special emphasis will be placed on a multimedia approach to this learning community with the use of reading assignments, computer exercises, video clips, written work, group discussions, and a service learning project.  Students will also have an opportunity to attend pre-professional health advising sessions. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the science component and one in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

LC7 
Women's and Gender Studies 200/Political Science 101
Alison Piepmeier/Marguerite Archie-Hudson
Sex, Politics and American Culture
Why  does the media report on  Hillary Clinton’s dress size?  Why have all  school shooters been  male? How is gender affected by other identity categories, like race?  Students in this learning community will explore the roles that sex  and gender play in American life and politics. The professors for this  learning community are the director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program and a former California legislator who is now a professor of  Political  Science. We’ll discuss current controversies, media and  popular culture, and social change. This course is part of a Living/Learning Community consisting of students in several Political Science-themed FYE courses, housed in McConnell Residence Hall. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

LC8 
Chemistry 111/Biology 111
Pam Gelasco/Stephanie Dellis
Chemistry and Biology for Pre-Med Students
 This Learning Community is tailored to incoming freshmen with a strong desire to pursue a career in medicine or in biomedical research.  The fields of Chemistry and Biology are increasingly intertwined and we will use these two introductory classes to demonstrate the natural connections in the fields. The Community will include sessions that focus on career opportunities and on strategies and skills required for successful admission to post-baccalaureate programs. Students signing up for this Learning Community will have the option to live in a Living/Learning Community in McConnell Residence Hall.  See the Living/Learning Community brochure for more information. Either of these courses fulfills one course in the science component fo the College's general education requirements. Students majoring in biology, biochemistry or chemistry will need both of these courses for their major.

LC9 
Chemistry 111/Biology 111
Wendy Cory/Kathleen Janech
Chemistry and Biology for Pre-Med Students
This Learning Community is tailored to incoming freshmen with a strong desire to pursue a career in medicine or in biomedical research.  The fields of Chemistry and Biology are increasingly intertwined and we will use these two introductory classes to demonstrate the natural connections in the fields. The Community will include sessions that focus on career opportunities and on strategies and skills required for successful admission to post-baccalaureate programs. Students signing up for this Learning Community will have the option to live in a Living/Learning Community in McConnell Residence Hall.  See the Living/Learning Community brochure for more information. Either of these courses fulfills one course in the science component fo the College's general education requirements. Students majoring in biology, biochemistry or chemistry will need both of these courses for their major.

LC10
Theatre 176/Management 105
Allen Lyndrup/David Desplaces
The Art of Business
This community seeks to develop appreciation and understanding of the business of producing art and the art of productive business. Students in the community will identify and cultivate universal relational and academic skills through cross curriculum collaborative projects as well as service learning opportunities. Completion of this community fulfills one elective course and one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

LC11 
English 101/Political Science 103
Helen Delfeld/Simon Lewis
Writing and Thinking Politics
We have seen the election of the first African American president – in fact, the first minority head of state in the industrial world. We are seeing the emergence of superpower economies in China and India. Global changes have allowed us to eliminate distance and go anywhere, virtually and literally.  Yet many Americans are at a loss as to how to understand these world-changing events. Dealing with the increasing complexity of the world with analytical sophistication will determine how well we will succeed, both as individuals and as a society. The skills of critical writing and thinking in English 101 join political analysis of world events in Political Science 103, beginning that process. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the social science component and one course in the English component of the College's general education requirements.

LC12 
Theatre 176/German 101
Morgan Koerner/Susan Kattwinkel
Stages of Communication: Theatre and the German Language 
In the wake of globalization, both knowledge of a foreign language and the theatrical skills of communication, collaboration and creative thinking have become crucial for success in cultural pursuits, politics and business. This Learning Community will explore the theatre as a place of cultural exploration and communication and German language learning as an intrinsically theatrical endeavor. German 101 (Beginning German) will introduce the German language via a theatrical, interactive approach, while Theatre 176 (Intro to Theatre) will introduce students to the basics of theatre practice by focusing on German comedies (in English). The two courses will share similar vocabulary and will both apply creative, participatory teaching techniques. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the language component and one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

LC13 
First-Year Seminar 126-090/Communication 104
Fran Welch/Paula Egelson/Tom Heeney
Speaking for Public Education
This Learning Community pairs the First-Year Seminar Public Education Policy and Practice in the 21st Century with Communication 104: Public Speaking, a required class for Teacher Education majors.  The community will involve interdisciplinary class instruction and extracurricular activities, including interaction with our convocation speaker and trips to Washington, S.C. and Columbia, S.C. to visit the respective Departments of Education.  Course participants in Speaking for Public Education will see and critique various speakers, including school board sessions, and community and education leaders, as well as engage in service learning in Charleston’s public PK-12 schools. Completion of this community fulfills six hours of elective credits toward the College's general education requirements.

 

FIRST-YEAR SEMINARS

FYSM106-001 
Love and Death in the Art of Picasso
Diane Johnson - Art History

Pablo Picasso (1881 – 1973) is recognized as the greatest, if not necessarily the best-liked, European artist of the 20th century.  Two themes dominated his art: love and death.  His first masterpieces at age 20 dealt directly with the suicide of his friend over love rejected by a Parisian prostitute. Later, continuously haunted by death - his own as well as that of family and friends - Picasso would turn his art toward the devastation of world war in Guernica in 1937.  In this class students will learn to “read” a broad range of 20th century visual art languages through an in-depth analysis of how Picasso expressed his own deepest, autobiographical emotions of love and fear of death from his early childhood to his death at age 92. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements. This class also counts as a major elective in art history.

FYSM109-001
Natural History of South Carolina
Dorian McMillan - Biology

Students will be introduced to the natural history of the diverse ecosystems found within South Carolina through both in-class instruction and weekly field experiences.  Emphasis will be on understanding the impacts human settlement and development have had on the natural landscape throughout history, and how ongoing issues may affect our living resources into the future. This class meets once a week for three hours, during which we will venture away from the CofC campus to visit local historic and natural sites. Completion of this FYSM fulfills three hours of elective credit.

FYSM113-001 
Plays, Puns, and Putdowns: Humor in the Ancient World
Jess Miner - Classics

We all love to laugh but rarely think about what we are laughing at and why. Although humor changes across cultures and times, like the Greeks and Romans we still laugh about topics such as politics, love, and bodily functions. This course offers an in-depth study of the uses of laughter in antiquity; we will examine the various types of humor that appear in a wide range of sources, including epic and lyric poetry, courtroom speeches, comic plays, satires, inscriptions, and graffiti. Students will gain greater insight into Greco-Roman culture since laughter was essential for maintaining friendships and (perhaps more importantly) for attacking enemies. In the process, students will also learn much about themselves and the power of the words that they use. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM117-001 
Designing Responses to Large-Scale Natural Disasters
Jim Bowring - Computer Science

Students will gain first-hand experience working in teams to propose solutions to the complex, interdisciplinary problem of creating national response strategies for natural disasters.  We will emphasize computational thinking and "imagineering."  Students receive training in skills such as library research, electronic communications, and web design.  Teams are encouraged to be self-directed.  Students will be responsible for developing and then articulating their plans in a public presentation. Students must have unlimited access to a portable, WWW-browser enabled and connected device. (This means laptop OR PDA OR phone, etc. Completion of this FYSM fulfills three hours of elective credit.

FYSM117-002
Computers and Music
Bill Manaris - Computer Science

What do Radiohead, J.S. Bach, and Pythagoras have in common?  They have explored the connection between music and numbers.  If you are interested in connecting your right (intuitive, visual, musical, artistic, innovative) brain to your left (rational, analytical, logical, sequential, and mathematical) brain, this course is for you. We will explore the creative side of computing in the context of music, sounds, and other digital artifacts. We will learn about media modeling and computational thinking in the liberal arts and sciences. We will develop several digital artifacts.  We will learn how to use computers to explore, visualize, speculate, and invent. Completion of this FYSM fulfills three hours of elective credit.

FYSM117-003 
The Science of Secrecy
Semmy Purewal - Computer Science

Have you ever shared a secret with someone? Is it still a secret?
In this seminar, we'll study cryptography, the science and the art of sharing secrets. In doing so, we'll learn how to use a computer to send secret messages and to crack codes. Along the way we'll learn how secrets have played a major role in the downfall of monarchs, victories and losses in wars, and the development of the modern computer. Completion of this FYSM fulfills three hours of elective credit.

FYSM123-001 
Shakespeare on Screen
Kay Smith - English

If you like Shakespeare and enjoy films, this course will help you learn more about both. We will look in depth at films from five or six of Shakespeare’s most popular plays.  We will also become familiar with the “language” of film and develop a sense of how the language of Shakespeare can adapt to this visual medium in a number of ways.  We will also examine the different “screen” approaches to Shakespeare, from animation and digital media to YouTube and beyond.  There will movie screenings on Wednesday evenings. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM123-002 
Healing Narratives: Chronicling Illness through the Ages 
Kathleen Beres Rogers - English

This seminar will examine what we now call “patient narratives” by exploring theories of pain and its linguistic expressions.  We will begin with nineteenth-century poems and diary entries and end with modern-day stories of illness.  Transcribing community members' own illness narratives, as well as listening to interviews conducted at MUSC, will allow us to understand the social and psychological impact of verbalizing pain. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM126-090 
Public Education Policy and Practice in the 21st century: Local, State and National Perspectives
Fran Welch and Paula Egelson - Teacher Education

Never has the status and future of public education been more widely studied and discussed as it is today. Students will examine 21st century educational policy and practice from local (Charleston), state (SC), and national (Washington, DC) perspectives. This will involve the study of educational policies and practice, reading and discussion of current educational practices, guest visits from well-known educators, touring a variety of school sites, visiting policy-making education boards, and responding to educational issues in written and visual form. In addition to local experiences, students will travel to Columbia, SC, and Washington, DC.  This First-Year Seminar will be paired with COMM104-Public Speaking, in the Speaking for Public Education Learning Community.Completion of this FYSM fulfills three hours of elective credit.

FYSM142-001
Jews and Race
Adam Mendelsohn - Jewish Studies

This seminar will investigate the ways in which Jews have grappled with race and racism over the last two hundred years. We will begin by briefly discussing the development of racial theory, and then explore the ways in which racial concepts have been applied to and by the Jewish people. Classroom discussion will involve a wide range of case studies and primary documents, covering topics that include, among others, Jews and Apartheid in South Africa, adaptation to the caste system among Jews in India, and Jewish responses to the Civil Rights struggle. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM146-001
Business Skills, Campus Leadership: Taking the Plunge
Carrie Blair - Management

Several topics from business apply to students’ roles in community service and campus leadership. For example, campus leaders need to understand marketing and product selection, motivation, succession planning, professional communication, and budgeting. Students will be encouraged to apply these concepts to their campus and work roles. Students will also take part in the Higdon Student Leadership Center’s programs for freshmen.  Completion of this FYSM fulfills three hours of elective credit.

FYSM152-001 
Animal Minds, Animal Rights
Hugh Wilder - Philosophy

What kinds of minds – if any – do non-human animals possess?  What moral rights – if any – do animals possess?  How are these two problems related?  The issues are fascinating and strongly contested; answers affect public policy (How should animal research be regulated?) and personal choice (Should I be a vegetarian?). Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM154-001 
Katrina: Understanding the Storm
Lee Lindner - Physics

Hurricane Katrina devastated Mississippi and Louisiana in 2005.  In the first half of this course the physics of Katrina will be examined, so that students understand why and how nature created this disaster.  In the second half, guest speakers from other disciplines such as psychology, communications, sociology, and geology will discuss Katrina from their perspective. Completion of this FYSM fulfills three hours of elective credit.

FYSM156-001 
Keeping the Republic: a New Call for Civic Engagement
Lynne Ford - Political Science

A record number of young people under the age of thirty voted in the 2008 presidential election, but now what?  How can you translate voice into action?  This seminar focuses on civic engagement.  What are the issues you most care about and how can you get involved to make a difference?  Learn how to develop and articulate positions on pressing public issues, advocate for your positions, and work effectively with others to make change happen. This course is part of a Living/Learning Community consisting of students in several Political Science-themed FYE courses, housed in McConnell Residence Hall. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM156-002
Contemporary Political Issues: A World of Risk
John Creed - Political Science

Risk permeates contemporary political discussions, whether the topic is terrorism, financial crises, or climate change.  Risk is also explicitly injected into our political discourses for partisan gain.  This course will examine the concept of risk in political processes and how anticipating it can alter politics in ennobling and destructive ways. This course is part of a Living/Learning Community consisting of students in several Political Science-themed FYE courses, housed in McConnell Residence Hall. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM158-001 
Living Life to its Fullest: Lessons from Positive Psychology
Rhonda Swickert - Psychology

Positive psychology involves the study of the factors involved in living life to its fullest. We will explore traits within the individual such as optimism and emotional intelligence that can facilitate positive life experiences (happiness, fulfillment). We also will examine how social institutions (families, communities, societies) influence the well-being of the individual. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM158-002 
To Know a Freshman
David Gentry - Psychology

The transition year into college is challenging. Many factors will influence quality of life and learning experiences for freshmen. The students in this course will conduct research into the lives of freshmen exploring this transition using techniques from social science and then employ basic statistical analyses to interpret the results.  This class will be paired with MATH104 in the To Know a Freshman Learning Community. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM166-001 
Female Action Figures on the Screen
Anna Andes - Theatre

If a woman wields a gun is she strong?  If a woman is physically aggressive is she an empowered woman, or is she just acting like a man?  Through the viewing of a variety of films from the last 30 years, this course will explore answers to these questions by critically evaluating the way in which female action figures are constructed both visually and thematically on the screen.  There will be screenings of films on Wednesday evenings that portray women in such roles as outlaw, comic book villainess and soldier, to name a few. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM166-002
Exploring Gender Roles and (Mis)Identity Through Dance
Gretchen McLaine - Dance

How have gender roles, prescribed by society, been translated onto the dance stage? From the French danseuse en travesti to the Japanese onnagata, we will examine the historical application of gender roles in dance. Contemporary artists such as Mark Morris, Matthew Bourne, Les Ballets Trockaderos and their views on gender identity in dance will be explored.  Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM168-001 
Gender Outlaws: Our Culture War over Sexual Identity
Richard Nunan - Philosophy

Among western cultures, Americans have been especially worried about an alleged distinction between good and bad sexual identities. Why the furor? This question will be explored through an examination of the origin of the concepts of heterosexuality, homosexuality, bisexuality, and transgenderism, and the continuing evolution of moral attitudes in our culture concerning these concepts, relying on a broad interdisciplinary selection of academic work: historical, philosophical, psychological, sociological, and religious, together with some literary and cinematic treatments of sexual identity. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.