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Fall 2008

LEARNING COMMUNITIES

LC1
English 101/Psychology 103
Marguerite Scott-Copses/Adam Doughty
Left or "Write" Brained? 

In our joint Engl 101 and Psyc 103 community, we will be asking and answering what makes us tick--literally. We will study why we are who we are through an exploration of the brain's capacity for memory, perception and learning. And once we've got it all figured out--who we are and why--we should have plenty to write about! Completion of this community fulfills one course in the English component and one in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

LC2lc2
Management 105/Theatre 176
David Desplaces/Laura Turner
The Art of Business
Creating a sustainable community through business and theatre: This community seeks to identify and cultivate universal relational and academic skills through cross curriculum collaborative projects as well as service learning opportunities. The community also seeks to develop appreciation and understanding of the business of producing art and the art of productive business. Completion of this community fulfills one elective course and one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

LC3
Latin 101/Classics 102
Darryl Phillips/Noelle Carmichael
Exploring Ancient Rome

Gladiators, chariots, political intrigue, gods and more: see ancient Rome come to life in this Learning Community designed to introduce you to the language, literature and customs of Ancient Roman Civilization. Classics 102 will explore everyday life in Ancient Rome through lectures and a variety of readings in English; Latin 101 will introduce you to the language of the Romans, covering the basics of Latin grammar and vocabulary while actively translating passages that provide direct insight into Roman culture. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the humanities component and one in the foreign language component of the College's general education requirements.

LC4
Math 111/120/English 101/Biology 111
Sofia Agrest/Caroline Hunt/Deb Bidwell
Scientific Reasoning: Across Disciplines

Successful scientists learn early on the power of analytical and critical thinking and of accuracy in written expression. Whether destined for a career in mathematics, field work, the health professions, high school teaching, research, scientific writing or simply exploring future options, thinking scientifically is central. Combining academically and socially linked classes with group collaboration and a powerful network of support from professors and peer upperclassmen supports the transition to college while building a strong foundation in critical thinking and written expression. This community requires weekly attendance at either Supplemental Instruction sessions or Synthesis Seminar. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the English component, one in the science component and one course in the math component of the College's general education requirements.

LC5
Computer Science 199/ Communication 220
RoxAnn Stalvey/Merissa Ferrara
What's Your Story?
We challenge you to examine your world, how you meet, interact in, develop and end relationships. It is an interesting blend of self exploration, application, research, online networking, and understanding the Internet's role in facilitating connections. Understand what makes you integral in the connected age! Completion of this community results in six hours of elective credit.

LC6
Sociology 101/English 101
Ann Stein/Mary Sadler
Society and the Individual
Have you ever wondered why people behave the way they do? Observe human behavior through the windows of sociology and literature for a better understanding of your world. Learn how sociology and English courses use different approaches to explore the relationship between the individuals and their society. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the English component and one in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

LC7
Classics 104/Art History 220
James Newhard/Matthew Canepa
Uncovering the Civilizations of Greece and Rome

How does the classical archaeologist go about recreating these complex civilizations using their fragmentary remnants? How did the ancients themselves perceive their visual and built environments? In ARTH220 and CLAS104 you will explore how scholars use material remains in combination with other evidence to reconstruct ancient societies, providing you with the tools necessary to incorporate visual, material, and textual evidence meaningfully into your writing; and gain an understanding of academic approaches to the field of classical art history and archaeology. Completion of this community fulfills two courses in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

LC8
Chemistry 111/Biology 111
Pamela Riggs-Gelasco/Stephanie Dellis
Chemistry and Biology for Pre-med Students
lc8
What do successful applicants to medical schools have in common? They have a strong foundation in chemistry and biology and they started planning for their future early in their college career. This learning community will couple two traditional classes taken by pre-med students, Chemistry 111 and Biology 111. Within thecontext of the normal curriculum for these courses, examples from medicine and research will be incorporated. Additional community activities will include advising for pre-med courses, meeting the College's Pre-Health Professions Advisor, medical studentguest speakers, and supplemental instruction. Either of these courses fulfills one course in the science component of the College's general education requirements. Students majoring in biology, biochemistry, or chemistry will need both of these courses fortheir major.

LC9
English 101/History 102
Joe Kelly/Rich Bodek
Revolutions: Rhetoric and History
This community studies the historical contexts and languages of revolutions, beginning with America's and ending with the Islamic revolutions of today. We'll read the novels, listen to the songs, watch the movies, hear the speeches, witness the events that have rattled the walls of civilization for the last 250 years. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the English component and one in the history component of the College's general education requirements.

LC10
Womens and Gender Studies 200/Political Science 101 Susan Farrell/Marguerite Archie-Hudson
Sex, Politics and American Culture
Why does the media report on Hillary Clinton's dress size? Why have all school shooters been male? How is gender affected by other identity categories, like race? Students in this learning community will explore the roles that sex and gender play in American life and politics. The professors for this learning community are the former director of the Women's and Gender Studies Program and a former California legislator who is now a professor of Political Science. We'll discuss current controversies, media and popular culture, and social change. Completion of this community fulfills one course in the humanities component and one in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

 

FIRST-YEAR SEMINARS

FYSM1 – FYSM158-001
Positive Psychology: Living Life to its Fullest 
Rhonda Swickert - Psychology

Positive psychology involves the study of the factors involved in living life to its fullest. We will explore traits within the individual such as optimism and psychological hardiness that can facilitate positive life experiences (happiness, fulfillment). We also will examine how social institutions (families, communities, societies) influence the well-being of the individual. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM2 – FYSM166-001
Appreciating Diversity Through non-Western Dance
Gretchen McLaine Theatre and Dance

Through this course, we will focus on how dance is used as an expression of cultural identity. In other countries, dance is seen as a universal activity that is essential in religion, society, politics, and morality. The importance of dance in the Middle East, Japan, India, Australia, and Africa will be the primary focus. This is not a "practice" course (students will not be dancing), but students will view multiple examples of dance, both digital and live. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM3 – FYSM123-001
Shakespeare on Screen
Kay Smith - English

If you like Shakespeare and enjoy films, this course will help you learn more about both. We will look in depth at films from five or six of Shakespeare's most popular plays. We will also become familiar with the 'language' of film and develop a sense of how the language of Shakespeare can adapt to this visual medium in a number of ways. We will also examine the different 'screen' approaches to Shakespeare, from animation and digital media to YouTube and beyond. Wednesday evening movie showings will be held every other week. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM4 – FYSM152-001
Animal Minds, Animal Rights
Hugh Wilder - Philosophy

What kinds of minds – if any – do non-human animals possess? What moral rights – if any – do animals possess? How are these two problems related? The issues are fascinating and strongly contested: answers affect public policy (how should animal research be regulated?) and personal choice (Should I be a vegetarian?). Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM5 – FYSM168-001
Gender Outlaws: Our Culture War over Sexual Identity
Richard Nunan - Philosophy

Among western cultures, Americans have been especially worried about an alleged distinction between good and bad sexual identities. Why the furor? This question will be explored through an examination of the origin of the concepts of heterosexuality, homosexuality, bisexuality, and transgenderism, and the continuing evolution of moral attitudes in our culture concerning these concepts, relying on a broad interdisciplinary selection of academic work: historical, philosophical, psychological, sociological, and religious, together with some literary and cinematic treatments of sexual identity. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM6 – FYSM162-090
Altered States: Alcohol and Drug Use in American Culture
Heath Hoffmann - Sociology

This course will introduce students to the sociological perspective by exploring how American culture shapes and often encourages alcohol and other drug use. Film, music and advertising will be examined as well as specific American subcultures (e.g. drug use norms on college campuses) to reveal the sociological basis of drug use, abuse and therapeutic interventions. Lab hours will include workshops and activities at a nearby minimum security prison. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the social science component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM7 – FYSM117-001
Visualization in Science
Chris Starr – Computer Science

A picture is worth a thousand words, an intuitive adage that can be quantified through information theory. As a mechanism of information collection, analysis, modeling, communication, and knowledge extraction, the power and utility of the human visual system catalyzes the scientific process and empowers scientists to consume vast amounts of data quickly. Empower yourself by understanding, using and evaluating images, graphics, animation and video. This is a course every science student will want to take because it is a skill that many scientists wished they had. Completion of this FYSM awards three hours of elective credit.

FYSM8 – FYSM166-002
Theatre and Ethical Choice
Susan Kattwinkel - Theatre

Theatre often presents its audiences with questions of ethical choice – which of two moral codes to follow, whom to believe, when to sacrifice personal desires for the greater good. This class will look at plays and performances that address these questions, examining not only the questions themselves, but also the styles in which they are asked, and connect those questions to the types of ethical quandaries that college students experience. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM9 – FYSM106-001
Love and Death in the Art of Picasso
Diane Johnson – Art History

Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) is recognized as the greatest, if not necessarily the best-liked, European artist of the 20th century. Two themes dominated his life and art: love and death. His first masterpieces at age 20 confront the suicide of his friend over love rejected by a Parisian prostitute. In visual images Picasso expressed his own sexual loves, from youth to old age, and continuously confronted the deaths, as well, of his own family and friends as well as those killed in terrorist bombings of Guernica in 1937. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM10 – FYSM117-002
Computers, Music, and Art
Bill Manaris – Computer Science

What do Einstein and da Vinci have in common? Each was an artist and a scientist. If you are interested in connecting your right (intuitive, visual, musical, artistic, innovative) brain to your left (rational, analytical, logical, sequential, and mathematical) brain, this course is for you. You will explore the creative side of computing in the context of music, sounds, images, and other digital artifacts. You will learn about media modeling and computational thinking in the liberal arts and sciences. You will develop several digital artifacts. You will learn how to use computers to explore, visualize, speculate, and invent. Completion of this FYSM awards three hours of elective credit.

FYSM11 – FYSM126-001
Public Education in the 21st Century
Fran Welch/Paula Egelson – Education Foundations, Secondary and Special Education

Never has public education in America been more challenging, interesting, and complicated. In South Carolina, less than half of P-12 students graduate from high school. As an inquiry course, participants will explore the politics, practices, research, and trends of public education. Multiple opportunities for experiential learning will be incorporated. Completion of this FYSM awards three hours of elective credit.

FYSM12 – FYSM142-001
Jewish Spirituality: From the Bible to the Present
Joshua Shanes – Jewish Studies

This course focuses on Judaism as a dynamic religious "tradition," in which innovation and change emerges ironically through asserting continuity with the past. It emphasizes the extent to which Judaism – and Jews – have always constituted an integral part of their surrounding societies and have both affected and been transformed by those cultures. Students are thus exposed to multiple religious traditions, through a Jewish lens, as they analyze how Jews over time have defined sacred time, sacred space, and religious leadership. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.

FYSM14 – FYSM113-001
The Individual, Family and State in the Western Tradition
Darryl Phillips – Classics

For centuries humans have struggled to define themselves and to define the relationship between themselves, their families, and the state. This seminar will explore these themes through reading central works of the western tradition including Homer's Odyssey, Aeschylus' Oresteia, Euripides' Medea, selections of Livy's history of Rome, and Virgil's Aeneid, all of which explore and define the appropriate roles of individuals, families, and the state. Completion of this FYSM fulfills one course in the humanities component of the College's general education requirements.