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Fall 2016

Students choose to complete either a Learning Community or a First-Year Seminar to complete the FYE graduation requirement.

Learning Communities (LC) link two academic courses (6-8 credit hours). Faculty teaching these courses work together to establish joint activities and common curriculum themes designed to explore the ways in which subjects are interrelated. All Learning Communities fulfill the FYE Graduation Requirement in addition to counting towards other general education requirements (listed with each LC).

First-Year Seminar (FYSE) is an academic course (3 credit hours) that explores special topics taught by outstanding faculty. 

All FYE courses have an attached Synthesis Seminar (FYSS).  FYSS courses are not academic and are discussion based so students get the most out of the experience.  Upperclassmen serve as peer facilitators and lead weekly 50-minute synthesis seminars that introduce students to the College’s academic community. The synthesis seminar component offers the advantage of getting the perspective of and advice from a successful College of Charleston student.

Students must be enrolled in all parts of their Learning Community (including all science labs) or First-Year Seminar to receive credit.  

Experiencing Charleston
If These Buildings Could Talk: Architecture and Historic Preservation through Charleston (LC)
Sending the ‘Write’ Message: Managing Tourism in Charleston (LC)
Beyond the Grave: What Old Cemeteries Tell and Teach the Living  
The World of Real Estate on King Street
Government by Design: Learning about Planning, Politics, and Policy from the City of Charleston
Be A Traveler in Your College Town: Exploring Culture, Identities, Literacies, History and Ecology in Charleston and the Lowcountry
Charleston and the Civil Rights Movement
 
Countries and Cultures, Past and Present
City of Light: A History of Paris (LC)
Exploring Ancient Rome (LC)
Brazil: The Land of Contrasts (LC)
Latin America and the French Caribbean (LC)
Anthropology, Peace and Ireland
The Gullah Community: Ethnographic Research in Gender and Identity
Getting to Know You: Westerners Meet the "Other"
A Window into Russia
Global Perspectives: ¡Barcelona!
Global Perspectives: Geography and Cultures of Spain
Latino/as in the United States
After Genocide
Children and the Holocaust
Jack the Ripper
Gods, Goddesses, and Life After Death: an Introduction to World Religions
 
Contemporary Issues
Communication and Advocacy (LC)
Feminist Jiu-Jitsu for Self-Defense (LC)
Psychology of Women’s Studies and Gender Issues (LC)
Society and the Individual (LC)
Dialogues on Social Identity and Social Justice
The Power of a Nudge: Designing Public Policies for Real People
The Importance of Financial Literacy 
Philosophy of Food
The US and Globalization
The Making of America: Presidential Politics and Policy Processes
Sociology of Food
Education and the Good Life
Teaching Fellows
Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics
 
Technology, Science and Health
From Russia with Code: Cybersecurity & Russia (LC)
Biology and Chemistry for Pre-Med Students (LC)
Gateway to Neuroscience (LC)
Viruses and the Coming Apocalypse (LC)
STEM-SCAMP (LC)
Biomimicry: Nature as Mentor
The Human Animal: Paleolithic Bodies in a Modern World
Health and Science in the Media
Technology Ventures (Israel, Estonia, and USA)
Computer Science Scholars
Electroacoustic Worlds: Sound in the Modern Imagination
Borrowed, Sampled, Stolen, Remixed? Cultural Perspectives on Musical Ownership and Theft in Music
Nuclear Weapons, Harassment, and Discovering the Nature of the Universe: Physics and Ethics
Evolution for Everyone
Out of the Lab and Into the World: Science, Media, and Society
 
Art and Literature
Beyond the Surface: Writing About the Screen, Stage, and Page (LC)
Psychological and Literary Analysis of Harry Potter (LC)
Photography and Memories
Plays, Puns and Putdowns  
Mayhem and Murder: 19th Century Gothic Monsters
Hemingway in the Hispanic World 
Shakespeare on Screen
Vampires
Eyes Wide Shut: Horror in Contemporary German Cinema
Science Fiction and the Human Condition
Introduction to Sculpture
Beyond the Curtain: Exploring the World of Live Theatre 
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: 20th Century Fashion History
Exploring Your Personal Ethical Code Through Theatre
Learning Communities:

Beyond the Surface: Writing About the Screen, Stage, and Page (LC1)
ENGL 110: Introduction to Academic Writing and THTR 176: Introduction to Theatre and FYSS 101
Malinda McCollum and Mark Landis
English and Theatre
4 English and 3 humanities credits
CRNs: 11233 and 11996 and 12344
Course times: TR 8:00-9:15, T 9:25-10:15 and TR 10:50-12:05 and W 5:00-5:50

Students will analyze theatre, visual arts, advertising, and popular culture in order to develop arguments about the effects and messages in a variety of texts. Students will consider each text’s layers of meaning, studying details in order to build claims about what the text evokes or suggests.  In THTR 176, students will attend several plays and be presented with writing assignments that ask students to articulate the participation of their own hearts and minds when joined with an audience at the theatre.  In ENGL 110, students will explore how ads, TV shows, films, photos, and posters use images to present arguments, reinforce and/or challenge cultural values, and influence viewers.

From Russia with Code: Cybersecurity & Russia (LC2)
RUSS 101: Elementary Russian I and CSCI 199: Cybersecurity and FYSS 101
Irina Erman and Aspen Olmsted
Russian and Computer Science
3 foreign language and 3 elective credits
CRNs: 10191 and 13514 and 12395
Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and TR 11:20-12:35 and W 6:00-6:50 pm

In recent years, Russian cybercrime has become the most dangerous threat to the US computer security systems. Government and businesses are scrambling to find Cybersecurity experts who specialize in Russian. This learning community helps you to acquire this much-needed expertise in the connections between Russia and Cybersecurity. RUSS 101 introduces the Cyrillic alphabet and Russian language, with a focus on computer vocabulary. CSCI 199 focuses on the domains of cybersecurity with specific examples applied to the Russian attacks. We will cover the following domain areas and touch on specific Russian attacks that penetrated the area in question: Access control and identity management, cryptography, policies, procedures, and awareness, physical security, perimeter defenses,  network defenses, host defenses, application defenses, and data defenses.

Biology and Chemistry for Pre-Med Students (LC3 A-D)
BIOL 111
: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L:  Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and CHEM 111*: Principles of Chemistry and CHEM 111L: Principles of Chemistry Lab and FYSS 101
Kathleen Janech and Wendy Cory and Amy Rogers
Biology and Chemistry and Chemistry
8 natural science credits**
(A) CRNs: 10118 and 10128 and 11992 and 10224 and 12439
(A) Course times: TR 8:30-9:45 and W 1:30-4:30 and  MWF 10:00-10:50 and M 12:00-3:00 and M 3:05-3:55
(D) CRNs: 12853 and 10133 and 12092 and 11393 and 12345
(D) Course times: TR 8:30-9:45 and R 1:30-4:30 and MWF 11:00-11:50 and T 4:00-7:00 and T 3:05-3:55

This learning community is tailored to incoming first-year students with a strong desire to pursue a career in medicine or in biomedical research. The fields of Chemistry and Biology are increasingly intertwined and faculty will use these two introductory courses to demonstrate the natural connections between the fields. 
* Math 111 is a pre-requisite or co-requisite for CHEM 111.  Alternatively, students who place into calculus via the Math Aleks placement exam can enroll in CHEM 111.
**4 credits towards natural science general education requirements and 4 credits towards science major.

City of Light: A History of Paris (LC4)
FREN 101: Elementary French and FYSE 121: City of Light and FYSS 101
Kathy Kaufmann and Bill Olejniczak
French and History
3 foreign language and 3 FYE credits
CRNs: 10313 and 13517 and 12346
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and MWF 11:00-11:50 and M 5:00-5:50

In this interdisciplinary learning community, students will learn about Paris, including its political, social, economic, and cultural history, art and architecture, literature, philosophy, and language.  Linking FYSE 121 with FREN 101 adds a strong historical component to FREN 101 and an enhanced linguistic and cultural component to FYSE 121.  Students will acquire the skills of a historian as they explore Paris from its ancient beginnings to modern times through film, fictional works, and historical accounts.

Communication and Advocacy (LC5)
COMM 104: Public Speaking and ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Julie Davis and Caroline Hunt
Communication and English
3 elective and 4 English credits
CRNs: 11408 and 11682 and 12347
Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and MWF 10:00-10:50, W 9:00-9:50 and M 7:00-7:50 pm

Being able to persuasively and effectively support, oppose, or request some idea, cause or other item is the heart of advocacy, and important for both personal and professional success.  The linked courses in this learning community will introduce students to the strategies, techniques, and ethical implications involved in the advocacy process.  It will examine advocacy at many different levels: self, individual, other, group, corporate, and issue. Students will learn how to both create effective advocacy messages and critically evaluate the messages they encounter.

Exploring Ancient Rome (LC6)
LATN 101
: Elementary Latin and CLAS 102: Roman Civilization and FYSS 101
Jennifer Gerrish and Noelle Zeiner-Carmichael
Classics
3 foreign language and 3 humanities credits
CRNs: 11733 and 11751 and 12348
Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and TR 1:40-2:55 and M 4:00-4:50

This course is an introduction to the daily lives of the Romans through study of literature, history, material culture, and language. Classics 102 explores Roman religion, entertainment, politics, and family life using archaeological evidence and literature. Latin 101 introduces the basics of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary while translating adapted and original Latin passages that complement many of the civilization topics and authors read in Classics 102.

Gateway to Neuroscience (LC7 A-D)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and PSYC 103: Intro to Psychological Science and FYSS 101
Miranda McManus and Melza van Roijen
Biology and Psychology
4 natural science and 3 social science credits
(A) CRNs: 12040 and 11995 and 12352
(A) Course times: TR 11:20-12:35 and TR 1:40-2:55 and M 5:00-5:50
(B) CRNs: 11160 and 11998 and 12359
(B) Course times: TR 11:20-12:35 and TR 1:40-2:55 and M 6:00-6:50
(C) CRNs: 12041 and 11250 and 12360
(C) Course times: TR 11:20-12:35 and TR 3:05-4:20 and M 3:00-3:50
(D) CRNs: 12042 and 12024 and 12378
(D) Course times: TR 11:20-12:35 and TR 3:05-4:20 and M 4:00-4:50

This learning community is aimed at entering first-year students with a strong desire to become health care professionals. These courses will demonstrate and reinforce the inherent, extensive connections between psychology and biology. PSYC 103 will introduce students to the science of behavior with special emphasis on the biological bases of behavior (neuroscience) and psychological disorders. BIOL 111 focuses on molecular and cellular biology, including neurobiology, highlighting the biochemical processes that define living systems.  Special emphasis will be placed on a multimedia approach to this learning community with the use of reading assignments, computer exercises, video clips, written work, group discussions, etc. Students will also have an opportunity to attend pre-professional health advising sessions. Students must also register for any BIOL 111L section to receive full credit.

If These Buildings Could Talk: Architecture and Historic Preservation through Charleston (LC8)
ARTH 105: Introduction to Architecture and HPCP 199: Introduction to Historic Preservation and FYSS 101
Gayle Goudy and Brittany Tulla
Art and Architectural History and Historic Preservation and Community Planning
6 humanities credits
CRNs: 13525 and 11993 and 12379
Course times: MWF 10:00-10:50 and MW 3:25-4:40 and T 8:05-8:55 am

Using the historic city of Charleston as our laboratory this learning community will introduce students to the world of architecture and historic preservation. The Architectural History portion will cover Western architecture from ancient to contemporary focusing on styles represented locally. The Historic Preservation portion introduces students to heritage management and preservation issues focusing on Charleston examples through field trips and studying buildings in situ. Students will write stylistic analyses, learn basic architectural terminology, and learn to research and analyze architectural and historical significance using primary source material.

Sending the ‘Write’ Message: Managing Tourism in Charleston (LC9 A-B)
HTMT 210: Principles and Practices in Hospitality and Tourism Management and ENGL 110: Introduction to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Wayne Smith and Kelly Owen
Hospitality and Tourism Management and English
3 elective credits and 4 English credits
(A) CRNs: 10692 and 11231 and 12460
(A) Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and TR 8:00-9:15, T 9:25-10:15 and R 5:05-5:55 pm
(B) CRNs: 11663 and 11917 and 12462
(B) Course times: TR 4:00-5:15 and TR 10:50-12:05, R 9:50-10:40 and R 6:05-6:55 pm

The purpose of this learning community is to explore how to conduct business in the hospitality industry. Special attention will be paid on how to communicate ideas and strategies effectively throughout both the industry and the community. This class will introduce students to the hospitality environment and guide them in developing professional skills through writing business correspondences such as memos, reports, resumès and cover letters as well as creative and analytical features focusing on industry issues. Students will explore Charleston and all its offerings to understand how the tourism industry works in one of the world’s premier destinations.

Viruses and the Coming Apocalypse (LC10)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Chris Korey and Chris Warnick
Biology and English
4 natural science and 4 English credits
CRNs: 13615 and 10493 and 12370
Course times: MWF 2:00-2:50 and MWF 10:00-10:50, F 9:00-9:50 and M 6:00-6:50 pm

Will the end of the human race come at the hands of a pandemic virus? What do the Ebola virus, Avian Influenza, and zombies have in common? The focal theme for this learning community, which connects Biology 111 (Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology) for Science Majors and ENGL 110 (Introduction to Academic Writing), will be the world of viral biology--both the science of virology as well as how this science is portrayed in popular culture. Viral biology will be the theme of our discussion of basic cellular and molecular biology in our Biology class. In ENGL110, students will be introduced to academic writing through an exploration of how the science of viruses is translated for public consumption through popular science writing, TV shows and movies. Students must also register for any BIOL 111L section to receive full credit.

Feminist Jiu-Jitsu for Self-Defense (LC11)
WGST 120: Studies in Women's and Gender Studies and PEAC 120: Women’s Self-Defense and FYSS 101
Kristi Brian and John Venable and Pat McGuigan
Women and Gender Studies and Health and Human Performance
5 elective credits
CRNs: 13601 and 12085 and 12404
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and TR 8:00-9:15 and M 7:00-7:50 pm

This learning community combines jiu-jitsu training for self-defense and an introduction to feminist empowerment. Each week students will have physical self-defense training on the mat and classroom engagement centered on feminist analysis of oppression, identity, power and the body. The course aims to achieve a holistic approach to an interactive dialogue. Students will be encouraged to document throughout the course how their own evolution towards greater empowerment is shaped by the jiu-jitsu practice and feminist teachings. The course is intended to be inclusive and suitable for all genders. Men, women, transgender, and gender non-conforming students will all be acknowledged for the situated knowledge they bring to the topic.

Psychology of Women’s Studies and Gender Issues (LC12 A-B)
PSYC 103: Intro to Psychological Science and WGST 200: Intro to Women's and Gender Studies and FYSS 101
Jennifer Wright and Lisa Ross
Psychology
3 social science and 3 humanities credits
(A) CRNs: 11026 and 13362 and 12407
(A) Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and TR 8:00-9:15 and T 3:05-3:55 pm
(B) CRNs: 12000 and 13526 and 12380
(B) Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and TR 8:00-9:15 and M 6:00-6:50 pm

Students in this learning community will explore the foundations of psychology, with an eye to how basic neurological and psychological processes (learning, memory, perception, social cognition) help us to understand various gender, race, class, and sexual orientation issues. Students will also look closely at the development of gender and sexual orientation and the influence that biological, familial, and cultural factors have on developmental trajectories.  From the Women’s and Gender Studies side students will discuss historical and contemporary feminism, race, class, and sexual orientation, along with a variety of gender-related issues – e.g., eating disorders, sexual harassment, rape, pregnancy, and sexual reproduction, etc. Discussions will continue to highlight the importance of various psychological processes for understanding these issues.

Society and the Individual (LC13)
SOCY 101: Intro to Sociology and ENGL 110: Intro to Academic Writing and FYSS 101
Ann Stein and Anna Lonon
Sociology and English
3 social science and 4 English credits
CRNs: 13607 and 11683 and 12464
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and TR 10:50-12:05, R 12:15-1:05 and T 8:05-8:55 am

Have you ever wondered why people behave the way they do?  Observe human behavior through the windows of Sociology and English for a better understanding of your world.  Discover the insights that these disciplines offer about how society affects you and how you affect society.   Both classes will look at this theme through provocative essays and other readings.

STEM-SCAMP (LC14)
BIOL 111: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOL 111L: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab and MATH 120: Introductory Calculus and MATH 120L: Introductory Calculus Lab and FYSS 101
Chris Korey and Sofia Agrest
Biology and Math
4 natural science and 4 math credits
CRNs: 13616 and 12463 and 11783 and 11260 and 12399
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and R 9:00-12:00 and MWF 11:00-11:50, T 10:50-12:05 and MWF 2:00-2:50 and W 6:00-6:50 pm

Will the end of the human race come at the hands of a pandemic virus? How are scientists approaching the study of Avian Influenza, Ebola, and the Zika virus, The focal theme for this learning community, which connects Biology 111 (Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology) for Science Majors and Math 120  (Calculus), will be the world of viral biology--both the science of virology as well as how these two disciplines approach the study of viruses. Viral biology will be the theme of our discussion of basic cellular and molecular biology in our Biology class. A themed project across both classes will have students explore how epidemiologists model viral outbreaks using calculus.  Students wills also be in a linked BIOL 111 Laboratory that is part of the Howard Hughes Medical Institutes’ SEA Phages program that connects students to an ongoing research project whose aim is to identify new bacterial viruses. This course to open only to pre-selected students.

Brazil: The Land of Contrasts (LC15)
LTPO 270: Studies in Brazilian Film and PORT 101: Elementary Portuguese and FYSS 101
Luci Moreira and Jose Moreira
Hispanic Studies and Hispanic Studies
3 humanities and 3 foreign language credits
CRNs: 11786 and 11312 and 12438
Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and MWF 10:00-10:50 and T 3:05-3:55

Classes encompass cultural products, practices, and perspectives through music, films, cultural events, dance, capoeira (Afro-Brazilian martial art), and cuisine of Brazil. LTPO 270 is taught in English and combines readings and films. The idea of Brazil as a country of paradoxes or contrasts (poor and rich, old and modern, liberal and conservative, violent and peaceful, religious and profane) will be presented. We will analyze the reasons behind the contrasts.. Portuguese 101 is an introductory language course with a strong emphasis on Brazil, a nation of increasing global importance economically, politically, and environmentally. Students will learn the basic language elements required for communication.

Psychological and Literary Analysis of Harry Potter (LC16 A-B)
ENGL 190: Harry Potter and PSYC 103: Introduction to Psychological Science and FYSS 101
Trish Ward and Adam Doughty
English and Psychology
3 humanities and 3 social science credits
(A) CRNs: 13376 and 12001 and 12556
(A) Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and TR 8:00-9:15 and M 5:00-5:50
(B) CRNs: 13529 and 13530 and 13531
(B) Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and TR 8:00-9:15 and R 4:05-4:55

Have you read each book in the Harry Potter series? More than once? Have you watched each Harry Potter movie? More than once? If so, then this learning community is for you! The purpose of the community is to explore critically several of the themes present in the Harry Potter series. These themes include, among others, love, death, power, innocence, prejudice, appearance/reality, choice/fate, and what it means to be human. The exploration will be accomplished in various ways. For example, you will practice close reading and analysis of all seven books in the series with special attention to how the themes are developed and how they relate to psychological principles and research findings.

Latin America and the French Caribbean (LC17)
LACS 101: Introduction to Latin American and Caribbean Studies and French 101: Elementary French and FYSS 101
Sarah Owens and Kathy Kaufmann
Hispanic Studies and French
3 humanities and 3 foreign language credits
CRNs: 10698 and 11678 and 13532
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and MWF 11:00-11:50 and T 8:05-8:55 am

This Learning Community will combine Introduction to Latin American and Caribbean Studies with French 101. Overall, students will be introduced to pertinent historical aspects of Latin America and the Caribbean related to its social, political, cultural, and economic development, while at the same time learning the basics of the French language. This Learning Community will also shine a light on current events in the French Caribbean with a specific emphasis on the island of Guadeloupe.

First-Year Seminars:

Anthropology, Peace and Ireland
FYSE103 and FYSS101
E. Moore Quinn
Anthropology
CRNs: 12229 and 12228
Course times: TR 8:00-9:15 and M 3:00-3:50
 
Utilizing readings, films, guest speakers, etc., Anthropology, Peace, and Ireland presents fundamental themes and concepts appropriate to the disciplines of Cultural Anthropology and Peace Studies. The first half of the semester anchors students in anthropological concepts such as cross-cultural comparison, ethnocentrism, cultural relativism, stratification, and culture change; the term’s second half uses both parts of Ireland – the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland – as a case study for students to learn how to apply anthropological ideas to peace processes. 


Getting to Know You: Westerners Meet the "Other"
FYSE 103 and FYSS 101
Barbara Borg
Anthropology
CRNs: 12231 and 12230
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and W 4:00-4:50

Americans' lack of cultural literacy is counterproductive in a world where our interdependence with "Others" in "Third World" countries is increasing. Having tended to interpret the actions of other nations in terms of our own culture, we need to examine our assumptions about "modern progress" and "Western superiority". Using examples from different times and places this course examines the evolution of Western attitudes toward native peoples very different from each other: the Vikings of the Far North who first settled Iceland, Congo Africans under a brutal Belgian colonialism, the Maya of Central America who have survived centuries of repression, and the Hopi, Eskimo, and Dakota peoples of native North America whose cultures may surpass our own in producing happy, well-adjusted adults.


Dialogues on Social Identity and Social Justice
FYSE 103 and FYSS 101
Kristi Brian and Ade Ofunniyin
Women's and Gender Studies/Anthropology
CRNs: 13463 and 12232
Course times: W 4:00-6:45 and T 1:05-1:55

This course offers students a framework for engaging in meaningful dialogue about processes of individual identity related to systems of oppression. As students explore how the social, political, and analytical categories of race, gender, class, sexuality, etc. relate to their own experiences, they gain a point of entry into the study of movements of social justice.  Students will study and practice the methods of Intergroup Dialogue through structured interactive exercises that we will debrief in class. Students will develop facilitations skills, which they will use in their dialogue projects. The goal is to inspire students to develop their own social justice lens and to produce leaders on campus who will be well prepared to build and promote diverse and inclusive communities.


The Gullah Community: Ethnographic Research in Gender and Identity
FYSE 103
 and FYSS 101
Ade Ofunniyin
Anthropology
CRNs: 13831 and 13832 

Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and T 7:05-7:55 pm

This course proposes to introduce first-year students to the Gullah-Geechee community, culture, and historical significance in the context of ethnographic research and fieldwork, and through a lens of gender and identity studies. Our focus will be on women’s narratives, especially those that centralize multi-national/regional identity and the desire to reconcile this identity by returning to their “roots” or homelands, or by evoking their ancestors’ narratives. The class will read the novel Daughters of the Dust, written by Julie Dash, who is currently a visiting scholar at the College of Charleston in African American Studies. We will also take several class travel excursions to significant historical sites or places of interest such as Penn Center in Beaufort, SC, and Feilding’s Home in downtown Charleston.

 
Photography and Memories
FYSE 105 and FYSS 101
Mary Trent
Art History
CRNs: 13435 and 13465
Course times: TR 8:00-9:15 and R 4:05-4:55

Since they were invented, photographs have been used to capture moments in time and preserve memories.  This course will look at examples of photographs from the 19th century to today to study the many ways people have used photographs to capture and construct personal and collective recollections.  The class will include trips to Charleston archives to see historical photographs and albums.  Assignments will ask students to understand scholarly writing about photography and memory, to reflect on memories associated with photographs from their daily lives, and to develop an imagined or virtual exhibition of photographs that address a specific theme about memory chosen by the student him/herself. 


Biomimicry: Nature as Mentor
FYSE 108 and FYSS 101
Deb Bidwell
Biology
CRNs: 13467 and 12237
Course times: MWF 1:30-2:20 and W 8:00-8:50 am

What can nature teach humans about fitting in on earth?  When and why did humans become isolated from the natural world?  Nature constructs, transports, communicates, and transacts business, yet balances form and function with elegant efficiency.  It self assembles, wastes nearly nothing, recycles everything, and produces no pollution.  How can modern human civilization (re)learn to live sustainably with the other 30 million species sharing our planet, yet keep our modern lifestyle? Biomimicry is the exciting, emerging, interdisciplinary field that looks to nature as a mentor to design sustainable solutions to human problems.  With over 3.8 billion years of experience, the natural world has already solved the same challenges humans are facing today! In this inspiring, hands-on First Year Seminar we’ll explore biomimicry, and prepare students to take on leadership roles in the sustainability movement.


The Human Animal: Paleolithic Bodies in a Modern World
FYSE 108 and FYSS 101
Bob Podolsky
Biology
CRNs: 12236 and 12239
Course times: MW 3:00-4:15 and T 3:05-3:55

Humans in industrialized societies suffer from a number of physical and psychological issues that may be rooted in a mismatch between the conditions under which much of human evolution occurred (e.g., food security, lack of obsessive cleanliness, sunlight-based activity, bipedalism on a soft substrate) and the conditions of modern western life. This class will explore this idea beginning with basic principles of evolution and recent human evolution, moving to maladies that are increasingly addressed through modern medicine and technology, and ending with the promise and ethical challenges of trans/post-human ideas. The course will involve active and inquiry-based learning, giving students responsibility to research human conditions of interest, ranging among cancers, skin conditions, dietary diseases, allergies, depression, infertility, and musculo-skeletal disorders.


Plays, Puns and Putdowns  
FYSE 110 and FYSS 101 
Tim Johnson
Classics
CRNs: 12238 and 12241
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and M 12:00-12:50

We all love to laugh but rarely think about what we are laughing at and why.  Although humor changes across cultures and times, like the Greeks and Romans we still laugh about topics such as politics, love, and bodily functions. This course offers an in-depth study of the uses of laughter in antiquity; we will examine the various types of humor that appear in a wide range of sources, including epic and lyric poetry, courtroom speeches, comic plays, satires, inscriptions, and graffiti. Students will gain greater insight into Greco-Roman culture since laughter and the free speech associated with it were essential for maintaining friendships and (perhaps more importantly) democratic and republican forms of government.


Beyond the Grave: What Old Cemeteries Tell and Teach the Living  
FYSE 111 and FYSS 101
Patrick Harwood
Communication
CRNs: 12240 and 12243
Course times: M 6:00-8:45 and W 5:00-5:50
 
The College of Charleston is surrounded by Charleston’s historic streets, buildings, and cemeteries.  This seminar will focus on the many 18th and 19th century graveyards within walking distance of campus. We will use multiple disciplinary perspectives to study lives lost long ago and what how they were buried, memorialized, and remembered can tell us about our lives and lifestyles today. The instructor of this has authored two books about Magnolia Cemetery, a beautiful and historic 19th century Victorian cemetery located on the outskirts of Charleston.


Health and Science in the Media
FYSE 111 and FYSS 101
Caroline Foster
Communication
CRNs: 13476 and 12244
Course times: MWF 12:00-12:50 and M 5:00-5:50

Through readings, research and class discussions, this course examines problems with public understanding of complex science and health issues and the importance of this understanding for participation in the democratic processes that shape policy around these issues.  Coursework emphasizes the roles of science experts and media, as well as members of the public, addressing these problems on individual and societal levels. Students will examine the history of experts’ roles in democracy; evaluate the communication models and media channels today’s science experts use for communicating with nonscientists and the barriers scientists/experts face in this process; and consider the values and responsibilities of members of the public facing problems with science and health literacy.


Technology Ventures (Israel, Estonia, and USA)
FYSE 112 and FYSS 101
Lancie Affonso
Computer Science
CRNs: 12242 and 12473
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and W 12:00-12:50

Technology Ventures and Information Systems are significantly changing the global competitive landscape. Technological skills increasingly need to be complemented by entrepreneurial understanding. This interdisciplinary computer science and entrepreneurship course will examine problems and issues associated with ventures that employ technology and innovative information systems. We will explore differences between ideas and opportunities, inventions, and innovations, and the unique challenges associated with reaching large numbers of consumers. Students will compare the startup scene in Charleston’s Silicon Harbor, San Francisco’s Silicon Valley and New York’s Silicon Alley. The emphasis this semester will also be on the technology firms in the “Startup Nations” of Israel and Estonia. This first year seminar would be beneficial for students who are interested in applying for The Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Technology (ICAT) program, including the ICAT Accelerator (Charleston), ICAT Global Israel (Spring 2017), ICAT Global Estonia (Summer 2018), and ICAT Academy New York (Summer 2018).


Computer Science Scholars
FYSE 112 and FYSS 101
Lancie Affonso
Computer Science
CRNs: 13800 and 13801
Course times: MW 3:30-4:45 and W 2:30-3:20
 
This first year experience seminar introduces computer science scholars to some of the computer and digital technology concepts and skills necessary to succeed in college, careers, and in life. In this seminar course, we will evaluate the impact of emerging digital technologies on local and global culture and the ethical dilemmas that arise. Students will discuss computer ethics, intellectual property rights, privacy, freedom of speech, and globalization.  Students will analyze information systems components (people, procedures, hardware, and software) from organizational and technological perspectives. Students will also attend computer science research presentations and learn about student research opportunities in computer science, data science, computing in the arts, and information systems. This course to open only to pre-selected students.


The Power of a Nudge: Designing Public Policies for Real People
FYSE 113 and FYSS 101
Daniela Goya-Tocchetto
Economics
CRNs: 13477 and 12247
Course times: TR 3:05-4:20 and W 4:00-4:50

Over the last 30 years, psychologists and economists have joined forces to study how people process information and actually make decisions, rather than how they would make decisions if they were completely selfish and rational. We will study several of the systematic decision biases present in human reasoning, and how they impact our lives, businesses, and our society as a whole. The central goal of this course is to improve students’ abilities to design policies and interventions that advance human development and societal well-being, focusing on how to leverage insights about human decision making for the design of the so-called nudge policies. This will be accomplished by building on the toolbox that standard economics provides for influencing behavior (namely, incentives and information) with the insights from the behavioral sciences.


Mayhem and Murder: 19th Century Gothic Monsters
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Tim Carens
English
CRNs: 12245 and 12249
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and M 2:00-2:50

In the 19th century, Britain perceived itself as the height of progressive civilization and cultural refinement. In this class, though, we will investigate the dark side of British culture, reading works that imagine an eruption of gothic monstrosity at the heart of civilization – within the dark cityscapes of London, the windswept moors of Yorkshire, and, most disturbingly, within the minds and souls of British subjects themselves. We will follow Holmes and Watson into lurid sites of violence and deception; accompany Dorian Gray on visits to opium dens, seedy thereafter, and riverside dives; and trace the routes of well-known villains such as Mr. Hyde and Dracula as they search or prey on the metropolitan streets. In addition to reading and discussing works of literature, we will test recent critical explanations of the Gothic grounded in psychoanalysis, historical dynamics, and gender theory.


Hemingway in the Hispanic World 
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Kay Smith
English
CRNs: 13478 and 12258
Course times: MW 3:25-4:40 and T 5:05-5:55

This course studies Ernest Hemingway's literary works that are focused on Spain and Cuba. These works are infused with a powerful sense of time and place because Hemingway lived through many events that were important to the Hispanic world in the 20th century, and wrote about the people of Spain and Cuba with great sympathy. We will read Hemingway's first novel, The Sun Also Rises, which made the running of the bulls in Pamplona famous. We will also study other works in which bull-fighting plays an important role, to examine how, as Hemingway says, "Nobody ever lives their lives all the way up except bull-fighters." We will read his Spanish Civil War novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls, in which he gives us a powerful introduction to the Spanish people in an historic moment of crisis. We will conclude with The Old Man and the Sea, his novella, set in Cuba, which won the Pulitzer Prize. We will move from close reading, to understand and appreciate Hemingway as a literary artist, to contextualization, to appreciate why Hemingway was drawn to important themes, ideas, places and events that he depicts in his writing on the Hispanic World.

Shakespeare on Screen
FYSE 114 and FYSS 101
Kay Smith
English
CRNs: 13965 and 13966
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and W 5:00-8:00 pm and R 1:05-1:55

If you like Shakespeare and enjoy films, this course will help you learn more about both. We will look in depth at five or six of Shakespeare's most popular plays. We will become familiar with the language of film and develop a sense of how the language of Shakespeare can adapt to this visual medium in a number of ways. We will also examine the different screen approaches to Shakespeare, from animation and digital media to YouTube and beyond. There will be a required viewing lab on Wednesdays at 5:00-8:00pm.

The World of Real Estate on King Street
FYSE 115 and FYSS 101
Lynn Hammett
Finance
CRNs: 12257 and 12260
Course times: TR 4:00-5:15 and M 5:00-5:50

This course will introduce students to the multi-faceted nature of the real estate industry. King Street will be our case study. We will explore office, retail/restaurant, industrial, residential, hospitality, and public spaces. An incredible laboratory, students will go out in the field to experience the marketplace and we will bring professionals into the classroom. Students will be able to see firsthand the variety of real estate that is located in an urban environment and the professionals will expose students to the many different career paths that are intimately involved with this discipline including business, law, historic preservation, public policy, politics, urban studies, environmental sciences, and arts management.


The Importance of Financial Literacy 
FYSE 115 and FYSS 101
Jessica Gibadlo
Finance
CRNs: 12259 and 12262
Course times: TR 8:00-9:15 and F 12:00-12:50

This course is an introduction to financial management concepts. Topics include money management, investment fundamentals, budgeting and an introduction to consumer credit. An emphasis will be placed on financial goal setting with a view toward personal values and the effect of financial choices on quality of life.


A Window into Russia
FYSE 118 and FYSS 101
Oksana Ingle
German and Russian Studies
CRNs: 12263 and 12264
Course times: MWF 9:00-9:50 and M 6:00-6:50

LET RUSSIA SURPRISE YOU. Step into “A Window into Russia” for a colorful survey of Russia’s major historical events and figures, along with a glimpse into the country’s literature, art, music, and contemporary life. You have never seen Russia like this, and you will never think of it the same. Come travel with us through one of the world’s most intriguing cultures.


Vampires
FYSE 118 and FYSS 101
Irina Erman
German and Russian Studies
CRNs: 13479 and 12266
Course times: MWF 12:00-12:50 and T 9:05-9:55

In this class we will examine the figure of the vampire, as well as the use of vampirism as a metaphor in folklore literature, journalistic texts, theater and film. Some vampires, as we will come to learn, do not even drink blood. Many don’t fear the sun. So what do these varied monsters have in common? Their “otherness” and their focalizations of cultural desires and anxieties. By studying vampirism through a historical perspective, we will learn that vampires – although they may not have reflections – reflect our anxieties about alterity, particularly in regard to such charged subjects as gender, sexuality, race, religion and nationality.


Eyes Wide Shut: Horror in Contemporary German Cinema
FYSE 118 and FYSS 101 
Nancy Nenno
German and Russian Studies
CRNs: 13480 and 12265
Course times: MWF 2:00-2:50 and R 3:05-3:55

What frightens us more: what we can see, or what remains invisible? Is it only the foreign and the other that seems monstrous, or does the intimate and the familiar terrify us more?  This course will introduce students to these questions through the exploration of what is depicted as monstrous in contemporary German cinema by examining the historical role of cinema in German culture. Topics to be explored include the role of national, ethnic, and racial otherness in German culture; shifting attitudes towards disability, mental illness, and gender difference; and contemporary ethical debates about medicine and ecology.


Global Perspectives: ¡Barcelona!
SPAN 202 and FYSS 101
Emily Beck
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: 13481 and 12268
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and M 5:00-5:50
 
This course fulfills the requirements for SPAN 202 and covers the required departmental curriculum with an additional focus on the history, culture, and dynamic experience of the city of Barcelona through supplementary readings, artistic works, film, and new media. Barcelona has long attracted tourists for its amazing architecture, delectable gastronomy, unique cultural history, distinctive urban layout, the variety of artists who have been inspired by the city and its lively social scene. This course is structured to allow students the opportunity to discuss, review vocabulary, and practice grammar activities related to the famous metropolis of Barcelona. Students will create presentations involving writing and speaking skills to share their research about diverse aspects of the city with the class. Students must test into SPAN 202 in order to enroll in this course.


Global Perspectives: Geography and Cultures of Spain
SPAN 202 and FYSS 101
Silvia Rodriguez-Sabater
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: 13482 and 12270
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and M 4:00-4:50

This seminar will fulfill the SPAN 202 course and cover all of the required departmental curriculum with a focus on the geography and cultures of Spain.  Students will learn the history and geography of Spain to understand how they have shaped its cultures.  Students will be assigned to different geographic areas of Spain and will create digital presentations involving writing and speaking skills to share their research with the class. Students must test into SPAN 202 in order to enroll in this course.


Global Perspectives: Geography and Culture of Spain
SPAN 202 and FYSS 101
Devon Hanahan
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: 13483 and 12272
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and T 5:05-5:55

This seminar will fulfill the SPAN 202 course and cover all of the required departmental curriculum with a focus on the geography and culture of Spain.  Students will learn the history and geography of Spain to understand how they have shaped its culture.  Students will be assigned to different geographic areas of Spain and will create presentations involving writing and speaking skills to share their research with the class. Students must test into SPAN 202 in order to enroll in this course.


Latino/as in the United States
FYSE 120 and FYSS 101
Nadia Avendaño
Hispanic Studies
CRNs: 12267 and 12275
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and M 5:00-5:50

This seminar introduces students to the field of Latino/a Studies in order to better understand the place of Latinos/as in U.S. politics, history, and culture. Students will be asked to examine how a heterogeneous and changing Latino/a population both shapes and is shaped by life in the United States. A selection of texts from various disciplines (including literature, history, music, and film) will inform our class discussions. The course will look at constructions of "Latinidad" as they relate to questions of identity, class, race, and/or ethnicity, religion, gender and sexuality, (im)migration, language, and popular culture.


Science Fiction and the Human Condition (2 Sections)
FYSE 121 and FYSS 101
Rich Bodek
History
(1) CRNs: 12271 and 12291
(1) Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and W 6:00-6:50
(2) CRNs: 12274 and 12293
(2) Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and T 12:15-1:05

Science Fiction (or speculative fiction, which sounds slightly more upmarket) explores political, social, ethical, technological, and other ideas. Because of the apparent distance from our world that appears in such stories and novels, readers can engage radical new ideas with open minds. This course will look at sci-fi works that explore utopias and dystopias, technology and its discontents, the nature of human beings, contact with cultural others, political philosophies, and war.  Be ready for The War of the Worlds, Dune, A Princess of Mars, Childhood’s End and more.


After Genocide (2 sections)
FYSE 124 and FYSS 101
David Slucki
Jewish Studies
(1) CRNs: 12555 and 12295
(1) Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and M 1:00-1:50
(2) CRNs: 12557 and 12297
(2) Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and R 4:05-4:55

This course will examine how societies have rebuilt in the wake of genocide. Our central concerns will be how genocides are remembered, how justice has been sought at the local and international level, and whether or not reconciliation has been achieved between victims and perpetrators. We will focus particularly on the aftermath of the Holocaust, and the genocides in Rwanda and Bosnia. By considering how the world has responded to genocides since the Holocaust, students will come to better understand the complexities of returning to normal life after conflict.


Children and the Holocaust
FYSE 124 and FYSS 101
Ted Rosengarten
Jewish Studies
CRNs: 12559 and 12299
Course times: MW 4:00-5:15 and T 4:05-4:55

Why did Nazi Germany target Jewish children with such special ferocity?  A small number escaped or were rescued and lived to write their recollections which are just now surfacing.  The ordeal of non-Jewish children in war-time Europe—German, Polish, Ukrainian—a story long buried in silence, is also finding a voice in film and literature today.  This seminar will investigate the experiences of all children who were swept up in the “Final Solution” and ask questions they might have asked about the world that produced the catastrophe whose meaning eludes us still.


Electroacoustic Worlds: Sound in the Modern Imagination
FYSE 128 and FYSS 101
Blake Stevens
Music
CRNs: 12294 and 12301
Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and M 4:00-4:50

The rapid pace and noises of urban experience inspired a new field of experimental music in the early 1900s. The Italian Futurist Luigi Russolo, for instance, proposed that the sounds of the city could be captured in newly-constructed “noisemakers.” The composer Edgard Varèse refashioned the art of composition into the “organization of sound,” which embraced electronic instruments and recorded sounds as well as traditional instruments used in often unconventional ways. Musicians of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have adopted and extended these techniques to create new sonic worlds. This course explores landmarks of electroacoustic music alongside parallel developments in the visual arts, literature, and film, placing these works within the broader context of artistic and philosophical reflection on the proliferation of modern technology.


Borrowed, Sampled, Stolen, Remixed? Cultural Perspectives on Musical Ownership and Theft in Music
FYSE 128 and FYSS 101
Michael O'Brien
Music
CRNs: 13490 and 12303
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and R 1:05-1:55

This course will provide a variety of perspectives on a single question: what does it mean to "own" music? We will consider the rights and responsibilities of scholars, music producers (performers, composers, DJs, communities), disseminators (record labels, pirates, scholarly archives), and audiences (concert goers, CD buyers, downloaders and streamers). We will tackle case studies involving appropriation, inspiration, (re)creation and outright theft. While we will consider the current legal definitions and regulations for musical ownership, this is not a course in copyright law. In fact, one of our central lines of inquiry will be whether (and how) current copyright law is an adequate or appropriate set of protections for engaging ethically with the world's music.


Nuclear Weapons, Harassment, and Discovering the Nature of the Universe: Physics and Ethics
FYSE 129 and FYSS 101
Jennifer Baker and Laura Penny
Philosophy and Physics
CRNs: 12296 and 12305
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and M 8:00-8:50

This course, co-taught by a physicist and a philosopher, will introduce students to philosophical ethics and issues in the field of physics. Students will learn which ethical issues in science have been addressed and which remain. In their final papers they will be asked to argue for possible solutions to ethical dilemmas that arise in physics.


Philosophy and Food
FYSE 129 and FYSS 101
Deborah Boyle
Philosophy
CRNs: 13492 and 12307
Course times: MWF 12:00-12:50 and T 4:05-4:55

Food is much more than a basic necessity for humans. Food can have religious, cultural, and political significance.  It can be a source of comfort and nutrition, or of anxiety and poor health.  Food also raises fascinating philosophical questions.  Can food be art?  Is taste purely subjective?  What, if anything, gives someone the authority to be a food critic?  Is it unethical to eat certain kinds of foods, such as meat?  What about genetically modified foods?  Do we as individuals have a duty to help the starving?  Do governments have such duties?  Through class discussion and writing, students in this course will critically evaluate recent philosophical work on these topics, with the aim of developing and deepening their own views.


Government by Design: Learning about Planning, Politics, and Policy from the City of Charleston
FYSE 131 and FYSS 101
Kevin Keenan
Political Science
CRNs: 13493 and 12319
Course times: MW 2:00-3:15 and M 11:00-11:50

This course utilizes the major themes in urban governance, geography, urban studies, and politics to explore the City of Charleston. The course focuses on the “design regime” that has been created by former Mayor Joe Riley, who directed the City for 40 years. Under his administration, the City achieved new heights of economic development, tourism, and population growth. These achievements were organized around and subsumed beneath a priority for design and street aesthetics, followed by planning and traditional politics (labor, social programs, cultural claims). Further, this model of government by design has been transported through the urban system by a series of planning lectures offered by Riley for city mayors, creating the conditions for this model to inform local government in countless other American cities. The attention to design, however, has come with a cost to other pressing urban needs, such as sustainability and climate change, transportation planning, the decline of 1st tier suburbs (i.e., West Ashley), and income and social polarization along with gentrification. Will the design regime fracture in the new administration? Will these other pressing issues be addressed? This course will give you a critical foundation for understanding the emergent political changes in Charleston over the next four years. In this course, we will take several field trips to explore different concepts in operation in the “real world” of Charleston.


The US and Globalization 
FYSE 131 and FYSS 101
Guoli Liu
Political Science
CRNs: 13494 and 12321
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and M 2:00-2:50

The course examines the changing relations between China and the United States in a globalizing world.  Globalization refers to the integration of the world’s communications, culture, economics, and norms, thereby creating a much more interdependent world. This seminar examines the assumptions, theories, and concepts that shape U.S.-China relations. We will explore the diverse factors, national and global, influencing the position and actions of China and the United States.  The course focuses on four aspects: (1) analytical approaches to and theoretical perspectives on Chinese and U.S. foreign policy; (2) connections between domestic politics and foreign relations; (3) critical issues in contemporary U.S.-China relations; and (4) the future of the U.S.-China relations.


The Making of America: Presidential Politics and Policy Processes
FYSE 131 and FYSS 101
Kendall Deas
Political Science
CRNs: 13914 and 13915
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and T 3:05-3:55

Within the context of the current U.S. presidential election, this course will examine the political behaviors and attitudes of Americans to help students develop an understanding of how the policy process itself can influence public policy. While examining the role government institutions play in the policy process, this seminar will consider why some problems reach the public agenda, why some solutions are adopted or rejected, and why some policies succeed while others fail. Through course readings, discussions, assignments and activities, this seminar will help students understand the role government institutions play in the policy process and why governments and citizens make the decisions that positively or negatively affect their lives. This course to open only to pre-selected students.


Jack the Ripper
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Chad Galuska
Psychology
CRNs: 12300 and 12323
Course times: MWF 2:00-2:50 and M 9:00-9:50

In the autumn of 1888, a series of horrific murders in the east end of London shocked the world. Over 125 years later, the murders of Jack the Ripper continue to fascinate; and despite recent claims we are no closer to identifying the culprit. Within the context of the deplorable socio-economic conditions prevailing in Whitechapel, this course both analyzes the crimes of Jack the Ripper and attempts to humanize his victims. Contemporary and modern suspects are critically evaluated. The reality of the Whitechapel murderer is contrasted with his portrayal in popular media. In doing so, this course seeks to shine a light through the fog of myth onto the Jack of history.


Evolution for Everyone
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Stephen Short
Psychology
CRNs: 12302 and 12325
Course times: MWF 2:00-2:50 and W 1:00-1:50

Now over 150 years old, Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species and his accompanying theory of evolution still face substantial criticism and denial from individuals across the western world, but in particular the United States. In this course, we will begin by reviewing the scientific method, the theory of evolution, and natural selection. Next, we will explore how evolutionary theory can be applied across a variety of fields with examples from areas such as economics, medicine, anthropology, and psychology. We will also explore opposition to evolution and the potential costs of dismissing this powerful framework. Finally, students will use their new evolutionary perspective to explore topics of their own interest and share their findings with their peers.


Out of the Lab and Into the World: Science, Media, and Society
FYSE 132 and FYSS 101
Gabrielle Principe
Psychology
CRNs: 12304 and 12326
Course times: TR 8:00-9:15 and F 1:00-1:50

Science is central to many of the big issues that we as a society are grappling with, such as climate change, environmental regulation, health care, and even what’s in schoolchildren’s textbooks. At the same time, scientific literacy has declined and there is increased skepticism about the value of science in informing decision making. These trends have been accompanied by a shortage of useful and accurate science writing for the general public. In this course, we will explore all of these issues and more as we ask what happens when science enters the public sphere, and explore the ethical, social, and political issues raised by media coverage of science.


Gods, Goddesses, and Life After Death: an Introduction to World Religions
FYSE 134 and FYSS 101
Margaret Cormack
Religious Studies
CRNs: 12318 and 12328
Course times: MWF 9:00-9:50 and R 3:05-3:55

This course will introduce you to the beliefs, practices, and history of some of the major religions of the world. We will approach each tradition impartially, studying its beliefs about divinity/ies, the universe, the place and obligations of human beings within that universe, and the afterlife. We will see some of the ways these concepts are represented in cultural artifacts: poetry, art, literature. You will learn how people from different cultures look at the world, and how to think critically yet sympathetically about a variety of world-views.


Sociology of Food
FYSE 135 and FYSS 101
Idee Winfield
Sociology
CRNs: 12320 and 12330
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and W 2:00-2:50

Biology may dictate that we eat, but what and how we eat depends upon wider cultural values and social practices. This course puts food into its social contexts. We examine how what we eat and the way we eat it expresses our social identities and tells other where we fit in the social order. We explore how the system for producing and marketing food affects not only what (and how much) we eat, but creates issues of food justice in the larger society. We also examine how food is both an object of politics and a basis for social movements.


Introduction to Sculpture
ARTS 220 and FYSS 101
Joey van Arnhem
Studio Art
CRNs: 12049 and 12334
Course times: W 6:00-9:45 pm and W 5:00-5:50

The purpose of this course is to introduce the study of three-dimensional forms and concepts as they apply to the realization of sculptural ideas in space and time.  For and content receive equal emphasis.  This course will provide familiarity with the vocabulary associated with art in three dimensions.  Basic technical instruction will be provided in four studio projects.  All term projects will include an introduction to specific ideas or modes of thinking.  Projects will be supplemented by assigned readings and students will be required to deliver an oral presentation, attend two art events and participate in a class exhibition.  This course will emphasize conceptual reasoning and consideration of material choice, craft form, space, site, presentation, and context.  It will provide a forum for the discussion and exploration of sculptural practices.


Be A Traveler in Your College Town: Exploring Culture, Identities, Literacies, History and Ecology in Charleston and the Lowcountry
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Emily Skinner
Teacher Education
CRNs: 12327 and 12336
Course times: M 12:30-3:15 and W 8:00-8:50 am 

As a freshman in college, you will be engaging in new experiences, exploring new discourses, and developing new identities. Selecting the College of Charleston for your education has situated you in one of the most culturally, ecologically and historically rich cities in the United States. Whether you are new to the area or from the Lowcountry, this Freshman Year Experience will offer you opportunities to be a traveler in your own town through engaging in a variety of disciplinary learning experiences (i.e. education, ecology, history) . You will go on fieldtrips to places such as Bulls Island, the South Carolina Aquarium Turtle Rescue Hospital,  the Avery Research Center, the AME Church, and on walking tours downtown. Course readings will include participating in book clubs featuring local authors/contexts (e.g. Pat Conroy, Mary Alice Monroe, Sue Monk Kidd, Mamie Garvin Fields), viewing documentaries about education in South Carolina, perusing local magazines/newspapers, and listening to informational podcasts. Throughout the course, you will learn about a variety of disciplines and literacy practices. 


Charleston and the Civil Rights Movement
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Jon Hale
Teacher Education
CRNs: 12329 and 13507
Course times: TR 12:15-1:30 and M 4:00-4:50

The course introduces students to the unique history of Charleston and its pivotal role in the Civil Rights Movement.  The City of Charleston is inherent to a rich overlooked history that forms an important part of the long struggle for equality. This course explores significant historical sites and events like the Stono Rebellion of 1739, Denmark Vesey’s plotted rebellion in 1822, and more recent events such as the Briggs v. Elliott (1952) court case and the Hospital Workers’ Strike of 1969.  Students will study the history of our city through intensive reading. Students will also visit these historic sites as they begin to examine how popular narratives about Charleston have been constructed and various issues such as segregation and exploitation have been ignored.


Education and the Good Life
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Brian Lanahan
Teacher Education
CRNs: 12331 and 12338
Course times: TR 9:25-10:40 and W 4:00-4:50

This course will address two essential questions: “What is the ‘good life’?” and “How can education lead to the ‘good life’?”  The first part of the course will address the notion of the “good life” and challenge students to form their own definition based on selections from seminal pieces of western philosophy.  The second half of the course will analyze the role of education in leading students to and providing them with the “good life” as well as how students, teachers, and society can collaborate to provide such an education through the lens of selections from works of seminal educational philosophy.


Teaching Fellows
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Mary Ann M. Hartshorn
Teacher Education
CRNs: 12333 and 12339
Course times: TR 10:50-12:05 and M 4:00-4:50

This course is specifically designed for freshmen Teaching Fellows. These students have chosen education as their major and profession in return from the State of South Carolina. This course is the first in a series of learning experiences for students who will teach in South Carolina schools after graduation. Part of the Teaching Fellows Program and the Teacher Education Program offered by the School of Education, Health, and Human Performance, this course is designed to help students adjust to college life and excel as future educators. This course to open only to pre-selected Teaching Fellows.


Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics  
FYSE 138 and FYSS 101
Susan Flynn
Teacher Education
CRNs: 12335 and 12437
Course times: W 3:00-6:00 and M 3:00-3:50

Special O.P.S. Therapy Tactics course is designed to provide students interested in pursuing a degree in occupational and physical therapy as well as teacher education, with the knowledge and skills to design and implement movement experiences to enhance children's physical, social and emotional development. Students will participate in an aquatic and motor clinic putting theory to practice teaching young children in a therapy setting. Students will be required to go to an off-site facility during scheduled class times for 7 of the semester class sessions.  Students will need at least 45 minutes of travel time before 3:00 p.m. 


Beyond the Curtain: Exploring the World of Live Theatre 
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Glenda Byars
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 12337 and 12340
Course times: MWF 11:00-11:50 and W 12:00-12:50

This is a survey course designed to introduce the student to many aspects of the live theatre experience and practice. This includes dramatic literature, playwriting, “show business”, acting and directing, design elements and techniques, and critical evaluation of plays and specific productions. The objective is to increase the students’ understanding and appreciation of the role of theatre in society and as an art form through live theatre attendance, active participation, lecture and reading.


The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: 20th Century Fashion History
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Glenda Byars
Theatre and Dance
CRNs: 13510 and 12342
Course times: MWF 1:00-1:50 and R 9:05-9:55 am

This course will allow the students to develop an overview and recognition of clothing and fashion from the 20th Century and its cultural language.  Through lecture, discussions, and research, the students will examine the social, political, and practical influences on dress and accepted attire for men and women during the time from the turn of the last century through the early 21st century and the evolution of the modern fashion industry.


Exploring Your Personal Ethical Code Through Theatre
FYSE 139 and FYSS 101
Susan Kattwinkel
Theatre
CRNs: 13511 and 12343
Course times: TR 1:40-2:55 and T 5:05-5:55

Theatre often presents its audiences with questions of ethical choice – which of two moral codes to follow, whom to believe, when to sacrifice personal desires for the greater good. This class will look at plays and performances that address these questions, examining not only the questions themselves, but also the styles in which they are asked, and connect those questions to the types of ethical quandaries that college students experience.